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To Charles Lyell   [1 September 1844]

Summary

Asks about CL’s new book [Travels in North America (1845)].

Discusses views of A. D. d’Orbigny on elevation.

Mentions reading W. H. Prescott [History of the conquest of Mexico (1843)].

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Charles Lyell, 1st baronet
Date:  [1 Sept 1844]
Classmark:  American Philosophical Society (Mss.B.D25.39)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-773

From J. D. Hooker   [c. 3 September 1844]

Summary

Suggests there is a direct relation between temperature and abundance of plant species.

Author:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [c. 3 Sept 1844]
Classmark:  DAR 104: 221
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-774

To C. G. Ehrenberg   5 September [1844]

Summary

Has at last received first letter CGE wrote.

More specimens being sent.

Sends his sketch of paper ["Fine dust in the Atlantic Ocean" (1846), Collected papers 1: 199–203].

D’Orbigny considers Pampas clay deposit result of debacle. CD cannot doubt it is slow, estuary deposit. Would be grateful for information on this point.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg
Date:  5 Sept [1844]
Classmark:  Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (MfN/HBSB, N005 NL Christian Gottfried Ehrenberg Nr. 43)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-775

To J. D. Hooker   [8 September 1844]

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Summary

Acknowledges note and parcel for Ehrenberg.

Considers why different areas have different numbers of species. Gives an example opposing JDH’s view that paucity of species results from vicissitudes of climate. CD has concluded that species are most numerous in areas that have most often been divided, isolated from, and then reunited with, other areas. Cannot give detailed reasons but believes that "isolation is the chief concomitant or cause of the appearance of new forms".

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Date:  [8 Sept 1844]
Classmark:  DAR 114: 17
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-776

To Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette   [before 14 September 1844]

Summary

Referring to a correspondent who had written about Pelargonium plants whose leaves had become regularly edged with white, CD reports that nearly all the young leaves of box-trees he had planted have become symmetrically tipped with white. Though these facts seem trivial, CD believes the first appearance of any peculiarity which tends to become hereditary deserves being recorded.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 14 Sept 1844]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 37, 14 September 1844, pp. 621
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-777

To Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette   [before 14 September 1844]

Summary

Asks whether salt and carbonate of lime (in the form of seashells) would act upon each other if slightly moistened and left in great quantities together. The question occurs from CD’s having found in Peru a great bed of recent shells that were mixed with salt, decayed and corroded "in a singular manner". Mentions, as relevant to the value of seashells as manure, that they are dissolved more rapidly by water than any other form of carbonate of lime.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 14 Sept 1844]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 37, 14 September 1844, pp. 628–9
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-778
Document type
letter[X]
Date
1844
09
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05 (1)
08 (1)
14 (2)