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State Darwin Museum, Moscow, Russia

Matches: 2 hits

  • … State Darwin Museum, …
  • … Moscow, Russia Darwin Museum Moscow …

Darwin Archive, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, England

Matches: 1 hit

  • Darwin Archive, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, England DAR …

The History Buff (website) www.ehistorybuff.com/darwin_als.html

Matches: 1 hit

  • … The History Buff (website) www.ehistorybuff.com/darwin_als.html History Buff …

To Darwin Children   8 January 1882

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Summary

Advises his children as to how some money will be distributed among them.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  8 Jan 1882
Classmark:  DAR 185: 60
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-13603

Matches: 17 hits

  • … To Darwin Children   8 January 1882 …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR 185: 60 Charles Robert Darwin Down 8 Jan …
  • … 1882 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …

To CD’s Children   10 January 1880

Summary

Circular letter regarding the distribution of CD’s excess income, with a note addressed to W. E. Darwin concerning his handling of Elizabeth Darwin’s share.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  10 Jan 1880
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 155
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-12414

Matches: 18 hits

  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR 210.6: 155 Charles Robert Darwin Down 10 Jan …
  • … 1880 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …
  • … distribution of CD’s excess income, with a note addressed to W. E. Darwin concerning his …
  • … handling of Elizabeth Darwin’s share. …

To the Darwin children   21 February 1879

Summary

Circular about the distribution of the overplus of his income and advice on investment.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  21 Feb 1879
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 153
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-11896

Matches: 17 hits

  • … To the Darwin children   21 February 1879 …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR 210.6: 153 Charles Robert Darwin Down 21 Feb …
  • … 1879 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …

To CD’s Children   3 January 1881

Summary

About the distribution of [surplus income] funds among the children.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  3 Jan 1881
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 169
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-12972

Matches: 16 hits

To CD’s Children   16 September 1881

Summary

A circular letter on the distribution of his money at death and the division ofErasmus’ estate.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  16 Sept 1881
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 183
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-13340

Matches: 16 hits

To CD’s executors & other children   20 December 1881

Summary

Has promised to pay Hooker about £250 annually "for the formation of a perfect MS catalogue of all known plants [Index Kewensis]".

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  20 Dec 1881
Classmark:  DAR (CD library—Index Kewensis tom. 1)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-13570

Matches: 16 hits

  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR (CD library— Index Kewensis tom.  1) Charles Robert Darwin Down 20 Dec …
  • … 1881 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …

From C. D.’s children   17 January 1880

Summary

Send CD a present of a fur coat.

Author:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  17 Jan 1880
Classmark:  DAR 99: 208
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-12428

Matches: 16 hits

To CD’s Children   17 [January 1880]

Summary

Thanks his children for their present of a fur coat.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  17 [Jan 1880]
Classmark:  DAR 211: 1
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-12429

Matches: 16 hits

From Charles and Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin [13 January 1861]

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Summary

Two letters for WED at E. A. Darwin's. G. H. Darwin has been to dentist. Please collect and pay for GHD’s skates.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin; Emma Wedgwood; Emma Darwin
Addressee:  William Erasmus Darwin
Date:  [13 Jan 1861]
Classmark:  DAR 185: 117
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3046F

Matches: 23 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. …
  • … Wedgwood, Emma Darwin, …
  • … Emma Darwin, W. E. …
  • … From Charles and Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin [13 January 1861] …
  • … DAR 185: 117 Charles Robert Darwin Emma …
  • … Wedgwood/Emma Darwin [13 Jan …
  • … 1861] William Erasmus Darwin
  • … Two letters for WED at E. A. Darwin's. G. …
  • … H. Darwin has been to dentist. Please collect and pay for GHD’s skates. …
  • … London. B. at 2 o .30’— Your affect | C.  Darwin Dear Wm, I expect Eva will come with you, …
  • … 11 January 1861, and left on 21 January (Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242)). Emma was mistaken …
  • … The letter is dated by the reference to George Howard Darwin’s dental treatment (see n.   …
  • … 3, below) and references in Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242; see nn.  2 and 8, below). …
  • … Sunday. CD refers to his brother, Erasmus Alvey Darwin, who lived at 6 Queen Anne Street, …
  • … London, and to Francis and George Howard Darwin, who, according …
  • … to Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242), went to London on 10 January 1861, returning to Down on …
  • … treatment between December 1860 and February 1861 (see letter from G.  H.  Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin, [9 December 1860] (DAR …
  • … 251: 2226), letters from Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E. Darwin, [30 January 1861] (DAR 219.1: 36), [12 February 1861] (DAR 219.1: 37), and [20  …
  • … further identified. London Bridge station. Emma Darwin added this note to CD’s letter. The …
  • … House with William on 14 January 1861 (Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242)); to the London home …

To the Darwin Family    3 October 1828

Summary

[Caroline Darwin on behalf of CD] submits a petition to Darwin family for £20 to purchase a new double-barrelled gun, CD’s present one having become dangerous.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Darwin family
Date:  3 Oct 1828
Classmark:  L
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-50

Matches: 14 hits

  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin family …
  • … To the Darwin Family    3 October 1828 …
  • … L Charles Robert Darwin [Shrewsbury] 3 …
  • … Oct 1828 Darwin family …
  • … The ‘petition’ is in Caroline Darwin’s hand. The subscribers’ names are in their own …
  • … requisite for the purchase of new Double barrd Gun— Value £20— £.  s.  d. W Darwin 5= 0 …
  • … = 0 Miss Darwin 5 . …
  • … 0– 0 Miss Susan Darwin 5 "  0 . …
  • … 0 Miss Cath Darwin 5 "  0 "  0. …
  • … Caroline Darwin on behalf of CD] …
  • … submits a petition to Darwin family for £20 to purchase a new double-barrelled gun, CD’s …
  • … a Distressed Sportsman— 1828. Oct 3— Charles Darwin gent—humbly petitions all benevolently …
  • … liable to destroy the aforesaid Charles Darwins legs arms, body & brains & consequently …

From Edward Levett Darwin   7 September 1863

Summary

Glad to find they are cousins.

Sends his book [High Elms (pseud.), The game-preserver’s manual (1858)].

Author:  Edward Levett Darwin
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  7 Sept 1863
Classmark:  DAR 99: 17–18
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4295

Matches: 27 hits

  • … From Edward Levett Darwin   7 September 1863 …
  • Darwin, E. …
  • … L. Darwin, C. R. …
  • … DAR 99: 17–18 Edward Levett Darwin Derby 7 Sept …
  • … 1863 Charles Robert Darwin
  • … day or other it will result in being personal . Yours very sincerely | Edw d L Darwin Chr. …
  • Darwin Esq | F.R.S. …
  • … cousin, once removed ( Darwin pedigree ). CD and his family had gone to Malvern Wells, …
  • … a common one yet there are I know other Darwins. Your Wife sent me 2/1 for a copy of the …
  • … Edward Darwin was CD’s first cousin, son of …
  • … his father’s half-brother, Francis Sacheverel Darwin ( …
  • Darwin pedigree ). …
  • … No other correspondence between CD and Edward Darwin has been found. …
  • … Emma Darwin had apparently sent for a copy of …
  • … considerably enlarged’ edition of Edward Darwin’s Game preserver’s manual , which was …
  • … published in 1863 (E.  L.  Darwin 1863). …
  • … Emma Darwin had apparently …
  • … sent Edward Darwin a copy of An appeal , a four-page circular concerning the cruelty of …
  • … s manual are the only works by Edward Darwin listed in the NSTC . The reference may be to …
  • … the particular procedures necessary for trapping foxes ([E.  L. Darwin] 1859, pp.  25–6). …
  • … Marcus Huish, of Castle Donnington, Leicestershire, was married to Edward Darwin’s sister, …
  • … Frances Sarah ( Darwin pedigree ). The reference is to Samuel Boteler and …
  • … Hall, Nottinghamshire; Samuel Boteler Bristowe was CD’s and Edward Darwin’s second …
  • … August (see letter from G.  B.  Sowerby Jr to Emma Darwin, 22 July 1863, and Appendix IX). …
  • … See also letter from Emma Darwin to W.  D.  Fox, [ …
  • … September 1863] . The two parts of Edward Darwin’s Game preserver’s manual dealt with the …
  • … steel trap stands, as it always must, pre-eminent’ ([E.  L.  Darwin] 1859, p.  22). The …

From Francis Parker   22 April 1867

Summary

Sends £600 bequeathed by Susan Darwin to CD’s younger children.

Author:  Francis (Frank) Parker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  22 Apr 1867
Classmark:  DAR 174: 19
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5510

Matches: 24 hits

  • … Parker, Francis Darwin, C. R. …
  • … DAR 174: 19 Francis (Frank) Parker Chester 22 Apr 1867 Charles Robert Darwin
  • … Sends £600 bequeathed by Susan Darwin to CD’s younger children. …
  • … 100 Henrietta Emma Darwin …  100  …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin .... . . 100 Cha …
  • … s . Rob t . Darwin (Specific Legacy— a …
  • … portrait of Miss Darwins father —valued at …
  • … £4—) Henrietta Emma Darwin (a Silver Tea Urn—valued at £28 . 2 . 6)— …
  • … Susan Elizabeth Darwin, CD’s sister, died in October 1866 (see Correspondence vol.  14). …
  • … were the executors of her will (Susan Elizabeth Darwin’s will, Probate Registry, York). …
  • … Robert Waring Darwin. …
  • … I am | Yours very sincerely | Francis Parker Charles Darwin Esq re . Down Bromley Kent. …
  • … Extract from the Will of the late Miss Susan Elizabeth Darwin dated 1 st . November  …
  • … 1865— “I give and bequeath to my nephews George Howard Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin   …
  • … Leonard Darwin, and …
  • … Horace Darwin and my …
  • … nieces Henrietta Emma Darwin and …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin (the younger sons and daughters …
  • … of my Brother Charles Robert Darwin) One hundred pounds each”— I send you in a separate …
  • … cover the Undermentioned Legacy receipts for signature— Value Geo. Howard Darwin …  100  …
  • … Francis Darwin .... . …
  • … 100 Leonard Darwin .... . …
  • … 100 Horace Darwin . ....  …

To W. E. Darwin   30 [October 1862]

Summary

Thanks WED for observations on Lythrum.

Discusses family affairs.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Erasmus Darwin
Date:  30 [Oct 1862]
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 107
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3789

Matches: 26 hits

  • … to W.  E.  Darwin, [25 October 1862] . …
  • … To W.  E.  Darwin   30 [October 1862] …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, W. E. …
  • … DAR 210.6: 107 Charles Robert Darwin Down 30 [Oct …
  • … 1862] William Erasmus Darwin
  • … by the relationship to the letter from W.  E.  Darwin, 28 October 1862 . See letter to …
  • … W.  E.  Darwin, [25 October 1862] and n.  2, and letter …
  • … from W.  E.  Darwin, 28 October 1862 . CD reported this observation in ‘Three forms of …
  • … My dear old fellow | Your affect | C.  Darwin Months hence will do about counting seed; …
  • … and the letters from Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin, [19 November 1862] and [2 December 1862? ], in DAR 219.1: 67–8). William had …
  • … DAR 226.1). See letter from W.  E.  Darwin, 21 October [1862] and n.  4, and letter …
  • … and Hampshire Bank, Southampton. Henrietta Emma Darwin. See letter to J.  D.  Hooker, 27 [ …
  • … s visit to Down House on 31 October, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary (DAR 242): ‘Ch. …
  • … Lubbock, 25 October 1862 , n.  5. Elizabeth Darwin started at a school in Kensington run …
  • … by Miss Buob, on 27 January 1863 (see Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242), …
  • … and the letter from Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin, [29 October 1862], in DAR 219.1: …
  • … 63). The Darwins’ governess, Camilla Ludwig, was on an extended visit to her family in …
  • … in order to separate her from Horace Darwin. The Down surgeon, Stephen Paul Engleheart, …
  • … from which he had been suffering earlier in the year. See the letters from Emma Darwin to …
  • … William Erasmus Darwin, [2 March 1862], [27 May 1862], and [6 November  …
  • … in DAR 219.1: 49, 57, 64; see also Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242), and CD’s Classed account …
  • … of Down. On Saturday 1 November 1862, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary (DAR 242) that …
  • … having become friendly with Elinor Mary Bonham-Carter (see Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242), …

Wedgwood, Emma (1808–96)

Matches: 20 hits

  • … scientific work - she passed scientific requests from Darwin along to her correspondents. …
  • Darwin saw Emma as an exemplary wife. Relevant Gender Resources: http:// …
  • … scientists-wives Primary Sources: Darwin Correspondence Database, https:// …
  • … www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-441 Darwin Correspondence Database, https:// …
  • … www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-542 Darwin Correspondence Database, https:// …
  • … www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-761 Darwin Correspondence Database, https:// …
  • … www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-4498f Darwin Correspondence Database, https:// …
  • … www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-7922 Darwin Correspondence Database, https:// …
  • … Desmond and James Moore and Janet Browne, ‘Darwin, Charles Robert (1809–1882)’, Oxford …
  • … www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/7176, accessed 20 Feb 2013] Emma Darwin (1904) and (1915). …
  • … WSL,26,27,28,29,30 Wedgwood, Josiah II Darwin, C. R. …
  • … Emma Wedgwood Darwin 1808–96 Youngest daughter of Josiah Wedgwood II. …
  • … in 1839. Further Information: Emma Darwin née Wedgwood (1808-1896) was the youngest …
  • … of Josiah Wedgwood II. In January 1839 she married her first cousin, Charles Darwin. …
  • … She and Darwin had 10 children. Emma was religious: she had been baptised in the …
  • … beliefs. Early in her relationship with Darwin, Emma expressed concern about his religious …
  • … salvation. In spite of her concerns over Darwin’s religious beliefs, Emma remained …
  • … husband’s work throughout his life. Indeed, Darwin entrusted Emma with ensuring that his …
  • … even if he died suddenly. Emma often took over Darwin’s correspondence when he was feeling …
  • … unwell. Darwin recognised the critical role Emma played in helping to manage his …

To W. E. Darwin   26 April [1862]

Summary

Thanks WED for eyeglass.

Reports on health of Horace and family matters.

Has finished Orchids.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Erasmus Darwin
Date:  26 Apr [1862]
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 96
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3520

Matches: 24 hits

  • … To W.  E.  Darwin   26 April [1862] …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, W. E. …
  • … when Joseph Dalton Hooker was also visiting Down House (Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242)). …
  • … DAR 210.6: 96 Charles Robert Darwin Down 26 Apr [ …
  • … 1862] William Erasmus Darwin
  • … you saw Hooker work on plant. — Farewell, dear old fellow | Yours affect y . | C.  Darwin
  • … proofs of Orchids (see n.  6, below). Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242) records that the ‘Boys …
  • … went to school’ on Monday 28 April 1862. George Howard Darwin and …
  • … Francis Darwin both attended Clapham Grammar School in south-west …
  • … London (see DNB s.v. Darwin, G.  H. , …
  • … and F.  Darwin 1920, p.   …
  • … 63). Leonard Darwin had been tutored privately by George Varenne Reed since summer 1859 ( …
  • … Wedgwood. There is an entry in Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242) on 25 April 1862 that …
  • … half-yearly payment to Clapham Grammar School. See also letter from Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin, [3 February 1862] (DAR 219.1: 48). Leonard was sent home from Clapham with …
  • … see CD’s Classed account book (Down House MS), letter from Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin, [13 December 1862] (DAR 219.1: 69), and Correspondence vol.  11, letter to …
  • … G.  V.  Reed, 12 January 1863). Emma Darwin wrote in her diary (DAR 242) that she ‘Went to …
  • … was a family nickname for George (see, for example, the letter from Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E. Darwin, [26 March 1858] (DAR 219.1: 33), which begins ‘My dear Georgy’, but later …
  • … write to & not Gingo’). CD refers to Horace Darwin who had been ill since the beginning of …
  • … the year. According to Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242), Camilla Ludwig, …
  • … governess at Down House, accompanied Horace Darwin to the home of his aunt Sarah Elizabeth …

From E. A. Darwin, Charles Darwin, and W. E. Darwin to Thomas Salt 12 April 1864

Summary

Instructions concerning the payment of the principal and interest of the mortgage to Mr Childe.

Author:  William Erasmus Darwin; Erasmus Alvey Darwin; Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Salt
Date:  12 Apr 1864
Classmark:  Rachel Salt (private collection); sold at Spink’s, July 2018
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4460F

Matches: 14 hits

  • … E. Darwin Thomas Salt Esq re | Belmont | Shrewsbury …
  • Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, E. …
  • … A. Darwin, C. R. Salt, Thomas …
  • … From E. A. Darwin, …
  • … Charles Darwin, and W. …
  • … E. Darwin to Thomas Salt 12 April 1864 …
  • … Salt (private collection); sold at Spink’s, July 2018 William Erasmus Darwin Erasmus …
  • … Alvey Darwin Charles …
  • … Robert Darwin 12 Apr 1864 Thomas Salt …
  • … from CD’s father, Robert Waring Darwin (Shropshire Archives, SA D3651/B/47/1/1/1/1/6). …
  • … Robert Waring Darwin’s children had inherited the loans. Charles Langton was married to …
  • … principal to the account of the Re vd Charles Langton at the same Bank. E A Darwin | Ch. …
  • … R. Darwin | W. …
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The death of Anne Elizabeth Darwin

Summary

Charles and Emma Darwin’s eldest daughter, Annie, died at the age of ten in 1851.   Emma was heavily pregnant with their fifth son, Horace, at the time and could not go with Charles when he took Annie to Malvern to consult the hydrotherapist, Dr Gully.…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … lost the joy of the Household Charles and Emma Darwin’s eldest daughter, Annie, died at …
  • … to Malvern to consult the hydrotherapist, Dr Gully. Darwin wrote a memorial of his daughter …
  • … her own reactions in a poignant set of notes, which Emma Darwin kept. Links to a longer …
  • … and illness follow the transcriptions. Charles Darwin’s memorial of Anne Elizabeth …
  • …  ‘y. 4 An interlineation in pencil in Emma Darwin’s hand reads: ‘Mamma: what shall we do …
  • … To W. D. Fox, [ 27 March 1851 ] To Emma Darwin,  [17 April 1851] First letter to …
  • … From S. E. Wedgwood, [ 24 April 1851 ] From E. C. Darwin, [ 25? April 1851 ] To E. …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 20 hits

  • … In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished …
  • … used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwin’s letters; the full transcript …
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwin’s alterations. The spelling and …
  • … book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been …
  • … a few instances, primarily in the ‘Books Read’ sections, Darwin recorded that a work had been …
  • … of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the …
  • … own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific …
  • … the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwin’s scientific reading, therefore, …
  • … editors’ identification of the book or article to which Darwin refers. A full list of these works is …
  • … page number (or numbers, as the case may be) on which Darwin’s entry is to be found. The …
  • … in the bibliography that other editions were available to Darwin. While it is likely that Darwin
  • … where we are not certain that the work cited is the one Darwin intended, we have prefixed the …
  • … mark. Complete or partial runs of journals which Darwin recorded as having read or skimmed …
  • … to the journal appear, and the location of abstracts in the Darwin archive and journals included in …
  • … no means a complete representation of the books and journals Darwin read. The Darwin archive …
  • … are not found listed here. The description given by Francis Darwin of his father’s method of …
  • … number and the general orientation of the works upon which Darwin drew, particularly in the process …
  • … Autobiography , p. 119). †The scientific books in Darwin’s library were catalogued in 1875, …
  • … by H. W. Rutherford ( Catalogue of the library of Charles Darwin now in the Botany School, …
  • … 1929. At that time, most were transferred for exhibition in Darwin’s study when Down House was …

Darwin's notes for his physician, 1865

Summary

On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher who had studied medicine in London and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863 Chapman started to treat…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher …
  • … and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863 …
  • … Chapman wasn’t the first medical practitioner Darwin contacted around this time. In 1863, Darwin
  • … however, his health grew worse.  In his ‘Journal’, Darwin wrote that he fell ill again on 22 April …
  • … more attacks of vomiting and seeking another opinion, Darwin wrote to Chapman. On the day that …
  • … life (the section, ‘I feel nearly … food’, is in Emma Darwin’s hand). Darwin began the ice …
  • … given up the treatment (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865]). …
  • … Busk, 28 April 1865). In November and December 1863, Darwin had consulted the stomach …
  • … solutions to aid digestion ( Correspondence vol. 11, Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, 8 December [1863]) …
  • … D. Hooker, 26[-7] March [1864] ( Correspondence vol. 12), Darwin remarked that Jenner had found …
  • … Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, Darwin Evolution Collection (3314) and is …

Darwin’s student booklist

Summary

In October 1825 Charles Darwin and his older brother, Erasmus, went to study medicine in Edinburgh, where their father, Robert Waring Darwin, had trained as a doctor in the 1780’s. Erasmus had already graduated from Cambridge and was continuing his studies…

Matches: 16 hits

  • … In October 1825 Charles Darwin and his older brother, Erasmus, went to study medicine in Edinburgh, …
  • … London for further medical training (see letter from E. A. Darwin, [29 September 1826] ). However …
  • … of England. This list is difficult to date precisely. Darwin mentions reading  Granby  in a …
  • … The position of  Granby  on the list would suggest that Darwin was very busy reading in January …
  • … of chemistry in 1801. Other books illustrate Darwin’s wider scientific interests, and also …
  • … , which was edited by David Brewster; and Robert Grant took Darwin to meetings of the Wernerian …
  • … university. There are several books of travel, and Darwin seems to have been particularly …
  • … arctic zoology. Two titles are closely connected with Darwin’s family.  Zoonomia  was …
  • … a week between March 1750 and March 1752. Both he and Dr Darwin had Lichfield connections, but the …
  • … Almack’s ,  Granby  and Brambletye House.  Darwin wrote to his sister Susan on 29 January …
  • … <Ni>tric Oxide?   (DAR 19: 3–4) Darwin’s student booklist - the text …
  • … Henry Chemistry 17  2 Vols 8 Vo Sewards memoirs of Darwin 18  1 Vol 8 Vo. Several …
  • … 3 Abernethy 1822. There is a lightly annotated copy in the Darwin Library–CUL, bound with Abernethy …
  • … 14 Bostock 1824–7. Volume 1 is in the Darwin Library–Down. 15 Jameson trans. 1827. There …
  • … 1826 as an ‘entertaining book’ (see letter to S. E. Darwin, 29 January [1826] ). The letter from …
  • … younger sons. 17 Henry 1823. Volume 2 is in the Darwin Library–CUL. 18 Seward …

Abstract of Darwin’s theory

Summary

There are two extant versions of the abstract of Darwin’s theory of natural selection. One was sent to Asa Gray on 5 September 1857, enclosed with a letter of the same date (see Correspondence vol. 6, letter to Asa Gray, 5 September [1857] and enclosure).…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … There are two extant versions of the abstract of Darwin’s theory of natural selection. One was sent …
  • … and enclosure). It is in the hand of Ebenezer Norman, Darwin’s copyist and includes minor …
  • … which the fair copy for Gray was made. It was retained by Darwin (DAR 6). This version was …
  • … it has been transcribed here. The transcript does not record Darwin’s corrections and alterations …
  • … printed version is headed: “Abstract of a Letter from C. Darwin, Esq., to Prof. Asa Gray, Boston, U …
  • … 2 The printed version reads: ‘astounded’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 50). 3 The printed …
  • … and even in some degree methodically, followed’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 50). 4 The …
  • … reads: ‘good for carpets, of another for cloth, &c.’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 10 …
  • … not judge by mere external appearances, but who could’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 11 …
  • … reads: ‘and should go on selecting for one object’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 13 The …
  • … reads: ‘in a few years, or at most a few centuries’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 17 At …
  • … of the earth would not hold the progeny of one pair’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 18 The …
  • … 20 The printed version reads: ‘far more’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 52). 21 The printed …
  • … follow to obtain food by struggling with other organisms’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 52). …
  • … natural selection to any profitable extent. The variety’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 52). 25 …

Visiting the Darwins

Summary

'As for Mr Darwin, he is entirely fascinating…'  In October 1868 Jane Gray and her husband spent several days as guests of the Darwins, and Jane wrote a charming account of the visit in a sixteen-page letter to her sister.  She described Charles…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … As for Mr Darwin, he is entirely fascinating…   Darwin often discouraged would-be …
  • … her sister, Susan Loring.  She described Charles and Emma Darwin, their daughter Henrietta, Down …
  • … on— Since a severe attack of illness, Mr. Darwin sits on an easy chair raised very high, …
  • … and grounds Tuesday I had a little walk with Mrs. Darwin round their grounds— The house …
  • … easy chairs of all shapes & kinds, from Mr. Darwin’s great throne, to “the latest instrument of …
  • … After breakfast there were prayers in the drawing-room, Mrs. Darwin leading the services— Then some …
  • … a little uncertain, & kept very quiet all day— Darwin’s Expression experiment (or the …
  • … the glass!— The experiment was one in which Darwin asked a succession of visitors  to …
  • … were being stimulated by electric probes. Henrietta Darwin The oldest daughter …
  • … for Bromley, where we again took Cabs for Down, where Mr. Darwin lives— It was so dark by the time …
  • … first Cab, & whilst waiting for the second to draw up, Mr. Darwin came out into the hall to …
  • … home face! We made quite a party for dinner—Mr. & Mrs. Darwin, she in black velvet, two …
  • … Tyndal, Wm. Hooker, a boy of 16 but looking only 14, Leonard Darwin— I can’t get used to being grand …
  • … dinner with lively talk— When the ladies retired, Mrs. Darwin’s sister, Miss Wedgewood, & niece, …
  • … of the Country, will allow— Later I got talking with Mrs. Darwin & Mrs. Kempson, & happened …
  • … After breakfast there were prayers in the drawing-room, Mrs. Darwin leading the services— Then some …
  • … charming talks now & then— It was a rare chance when Mr. Darwin, Dr. Hooker, Dr. Tyndal & Dr …
  • … that does not often come in one’s way— Mrs. Darwin’s brother came to breakfast, Mr. Wedgewood, whose …
  • … quick interest in so many things. As for Mr. Darwin, he is entirely fascinating— He is tall & …
  • … in recommending “My Lady Ludlow”— Mrs. Darwin is very lovable, with her sweet, placid manner …
  • … & Mrs. Kempson came to dine— In the afternoon Mrs. Darwin took me in the carriage to call on the …
  • … walks. Tuesday I had a little walk with Mrs. Darwin round their grounds— The house faces, …
  • … easy chairs of all shapes & kinds, from Mr. Darwin’s great throne, to “the latest instrument of …
  • … always in use— Since a severe attack of illness, Mr. Darwin sits on an easy chair raised very high, …
  • … at lunch or breakfast— The two young footmen then— Mr. Darwin came to lunch, but always breakfasted …

Darwin’s hothouse and lists of hothouse plants

Summary

Towards the end of 1862, Darwin resolved to build a small hothouse at Down House, for ‘experimental purposes’ (see Correspondence vol. 10, letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1862], and volume 10, letter to Thomas Rivers, 15 January 1863). The decision…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … Towards the end of 1862, Darwin resolved to build a small hothouse at Down House, for ‘experimental …
  • … hothouse early in 1863 marked something of a milestone in Darwin’s botanical work, since it greatly …
  • …  vol. 5, letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 April [1855] ). Darwin became increasingly involved in …
  • … Though his greenhouse was probably heated to some extent, Darwin found himself on several occasions …
  • … make observations and even experiments on his behalf. Darwin’s decision to build a hothouse …
  • … Hooker, 12 [December 1862] and n. 13). Initially, Darwin purchased for this purpose a glass …
  • … of 24 December [1862] ( Correspondence  vol. 10) Darwin told Hooker: I have …
  • … Encyclopedia of gardening  (Loudon 1835), a copy of which Darwin signed in 1841 (see the copy in …
  • … of heat’ (p. 1100). The latter was the sense in which Darwin used the word. The building of …
  • … accounts (Down House MS)). When it was completed, Darwin told Turnbull that without Horwood’s aid he …
  • … ). Even before work on the hothouse started, however, Darwin began making preparations to …
  • … plants’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January [1863] ). Darwin apparently refers to the catalogues …
  • … whom he had dealt over many years. In his letter to Hooker, Darwin mentioned that he hoped to be …
  • … (letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 January 1863] ). Darwin agreed to send Hooker his list of …
  • … (letter to J. D. Hooker, 30 January [1863] ). Darwin probably gave his list of plants to …
  • … [1863] ). On 20 February, the plants from Kew had arrived. Darwin was delighted, telling Hooker: ‘I …
  • … moss, peat, and charcoal (see the letter from Henrietta Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [22 …
  • … (see letter from J. D. Hooker, [6 March 1863] ). Darwin derived enormous pleasure from his …
  • … (letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] ). Darwin’s aesthetic appreciation of the …
  • … the tropics. Even before he left on the Beagle  voyage, Darwin used the hothouses in the Cambridge …
  • … (see  Correspondence  vol. 1, letter to Caroline Darwin, [28 April 1831] ), and when, on the  …
  • … again’ ( Correspondence  vol. 1, letter to Catherine Darwin, May–June [1832] ). Years later, …
  • … 8 October [1845] ). Having indulged his senses, Darwin soon began the more serious work of …
  • … department at Kew, had helped select the plants for Darwin). Hooker had also sent seeds, and was …
  • … (letter to J. D. Hooker, 21 February [1863] ). Darwin’s hothouse became an important focus …

Darwin and religion in America

Summary

Thomas Dixon, 'America’s Difficulty with Darwin', History Today (2009), reproduced by permission.  Darwin has not been forgotten. But he has, in some respects, been misremembered. That has certainly been true when it comes to the relationship…

Matches: 19 hits

  • … America’s Difficulty with Darwin Thomas Dixon __________ Does anything …
  • … does not seem to be any danger of the world forgetting who Darwin was, or how his theory of …
  • … around with us in our pockets: an iconic image of Darwin, looking like a cross between Socrates and …
  • … resurgence of enthusiasm for the idea of a conflict between Darwin and God. Battle has been joined …
  • … we examine the peculiarly American religious response to Darwin in more detail, let us return …
  • … throughout their marriage. Religious controversy would also, Darwin knew, be inimical to the …
  • … in God. We can, thanks to the labours of a group of Darwin scholars at Cambridge University …
  • … Bromley, Kent, October 1 st , 1859.’ Down House was Darwin’s home, a rural retreat where he …
  • … gentleman naturalist, was not a manifesto for atheism. Darwin had read the book of nature and found …
  • … Origin of Species , we find the same message restated. Darwin wrote that ‘it accords better with …
  • … ennobled.’ In the famous final sentence of the book, Darwin concluded: ‘There is grandeur in this …
  • … being, evolved.’ From the second edition of 1860 onwards, Darwin altered the phrase ‘breathed into a …
  • … implications of the Darwinian view of nature, including Darwin himself, who, in private, was …
  • … (one of thousands that can now be read online thanks to the Darwin Correspondence Project), he wrote …
  • … correct description of my state of mind.’ Whatever Darwin’s own doubts, by 1882 most …
  • … religious worries about evolution, and a famous spat between Darwin’s friend Thomas Huxley and the …
  • … Frederick Farrar assured the assembled dignitaries that Darwin’s theory posed no threat to belief in …
  • … Bible describing the wisdom of Solomon, which he applied to Darwin: ‘He spake of trees, from the …
  • … find that about half of the population deny the truth of Darwin’s theory and believe, instead, that …

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children,[1] began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and Animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in…

Matches: 21 hits

  • … Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children,[1] began the …
  • … is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the …
  • … lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on …
  • … the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwin’s notes reveals, he closely …
  • … William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are …
  • … The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwin’s character clearly perceived by Emma during …
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6] For in these notes, Darwin’s deep scientific curiosity transcends his …
  • … that on occasion he refers to William as ‘it’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate …
  • … memories.[8] Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwin’s scientific goal, the notes here …
  • … the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had increased by five: …
  • … the onset of frowning, smiling, etc., as was the focus of Darwin’s attention on William and Anne, …
  • … of logical thought and language. On 20 May 1854, Darwin again took over the notebook and, …
  • … all the notes until July 1856, when the observations ceased. Darwin’s later entries, like Emma’s, …
  • … Transcription: 1 [9] W. Erasmus. Darwin born. Dec. 27 th . 1839.—[10] During first week. …
  • … written in pencil by CD and subsequently overwritten by Emma Darwin. The transcription throughout …
  • … [15] ‘Annie . . . fortnight’ was written by Emma Darwin on the verso of page 3 and opposite the …
  • … The name and address of a Mrs Locke are noted in Emma Darwin’s 1843 diary. [16] The following …
  • … following text to ‘Feb 27. 1840’ on page 6 is in Emma Darwin’s hand. [19] ‘After . . . weeks …
  • … of the section. [20] CD’s sister, Emily Catherine Darwin, who stayed with CD and Emma Darwin
  • … [22] The text on this page is not in the hand of CD or Emma Darwin. It was probably dictated by CD …
  • … [25] The details on this page were written by Emma Darwin. [26] This note (in pencil) by Emma …

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Charles Darwin’s daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and July 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University Library (DAR 247). They are published in volume 19 of The…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … Charles Darwin’s daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and …
  • … 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University …
  • … excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwin’s letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • … scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwin’s own discussion of religious belief in …
  • … of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his …
  • … emotion (see letters from F. J. Wedgwood to H. E. and C. R. Darwin, [1867–72],  letter   nos. 7058 …
  • … one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and …
  • … period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the …

Darwin on marriage

Summary

On 11 November 1838 Darwin wrote in his journal ‘The day of days!’. He had proposed to his cousin, Emma Wedgwood, and been accepted; they were married on 29 January 1839. Darwin appears to have written these two notes weighing up the pros and cons of…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … On 11 November 1838 Darwin wrote in his journal ‘The day of days!’. He had proposed to his …
  • … and been accepted; they were married on 29 January 1839. Darwin appears to have written these two …
  • … his engagement. The original manuscripts are in the Darwin Archive in Cambridge University Library. …

Darwin on childhood

Summary

On his engagement to his cousin, Emma Wedgwood, in 1838, Darwin wrote down his recollections of his early childhood.  Life. Written August–– 1838 My earliest recollection, the date of which I can approximately tell, and which must have been before…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … On his engagement to his cousin, Emma Wedgwood, in 1838, Darwin wrote down his recollections of his …
  • … 56–62. A modernised transcription was published by Francis Darwin in More Letters of Charles Darwin. …

Vivisection: Darwin's testimony to the Royal Commission

Summary

Wednesday, 3rd November 1875. Mr. Charles Darwin called in and examined. 4661. (Chairman.) We are very sensible of your kindness in coming at some sacrifice to yourself to express your opinions to the Commission. We attribute it to the great…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Wednesday, 3rd November 1875. Mr. Charles Darwin called in and examined. …

Essay: Design versus necessity

Summary

—by Asa Gray DESIGN VERSUS NECESSITY.—DISCUSSION BETWEEN TWO READERS OF DARWIN’S TREATISE ON THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES, UPON ITS NATURAL THEOLOGY. (American Journal of Science and Arts, September, 1860) D.T.—Is Darwin’s theory atheistic or pantheistic…

Matches: 19 hits

  • … DESIGN VERSUS NECESSITY.—DISCUSSION BETWEEN TWO READERS OF DARWIN’S TREATISE ON THE ORIGIN OF …
  • … of Science and Arts, September , 1860) D.T.—Is Darwin’s theory atheistic or pantheistic? …
  • … Let me now trace these principles as sources of action in Darwin’s work or theory. Let us see how …
  • … or without a specific purpose or conscious foresight. Mr. Darwin has specified in a most clear and …
  • … and design, are opposed by anything that can be found in Darwin’s theory; for, so far, Darwin’s laws …
  • … of the eye, if it were constructed under the operation of Darwin’s laws, I shall not for one moment …
  • … or a watchmaker. Let this mind, in this state, cross Darwin’s work, and find that, after a sensitive …
  • … chance, as impossible. It must then be a design. But Darwin brings up another power, namely, natural …
  • … is a step decidedly atheistical. It is in vain to say that Darwin takes the creation of organic life …
  • … The atheist will say, Wait a little. Some future Darwin will show how the simple forms came …
  • … of design from the eye, or the hand, as it stood before Darwin’s theory was promulgated, would be …
  • … at the course taken in your answer to my statement on Darwin’s theory. You there seem to suppose …
  • … of design from the eye and the hand, as it stood before Darwin’s theory was promulgated, is …
  • … to seal his verdict in favor of design, when he opens Mr. Darwin’s book. There he finds that …
  • … the design of the hand that put it in motion. ( See Darwin, p. 169.) Let us lay before our …
  • … with the same confidence that he would before he heard of Darwin? If not, then “the supposed proof …
  • … to seal his verdict in favor of design, and a designer, when Darwin’s book appeared, why should his …
  • … lens, yet as much as a common spectacle-glass? Darwin only assures you that what you may have …
  • … the natural theologians, is just as good now, if we accept Darwin’s theory, as it was before that …

'An Appeal' against animal cruelty

Summary

The four-page pamphlet transcribed below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [29 September 1863]). The pamphlet, which protested against the cruelty of steel vermin…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see letter from Emma Darwin
  • … and September 1863 (see letter from G. B. Sowerby Jr to Emma Darwin, 22 July 1863 and n. 1, and …
  • … many persons Squires Ladies & MPs' (see letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [6–27 …
  • … the campaign than she expected (see the letter from Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [2 …
  • … distributing the 'cruelty pamphlet', and letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, 8 December …
  • … paper Animal World , and prominently linked Charles Darwin"s name to the offer of a prize …
  • … had little direct effect (Moss 1961, pp. 146–7, Emma Darwin 2: 200). Although the RSPCA …
  • … than the possible alternatives (see letter from E. L. Darwin, 7 September 1863, letter from Emma …
  • … in 1877 ( Spectator , 6 January 1877, p. 15, and Emma Darwin 2: 200–1). While Emma …
  • … for working horses with sore necks (see letter from Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [23 April …
  • … moral qualities possessed by human civilisation. However, Darwin was not against blood-sports: his …
  • … , pp. 78–9, Correspondence vol. 7, letter to W. E. Darwin, 22 [September 1858], and this volume, …
  • … Strong, Printer, Bromley, Kent. 7   or to Mrs C. Darwin | Downbar Bromley | Kent. 8 …
  • … Sowerby Jr (see letter from G. B. Sowerby Jr to Emma Darwin, 22 July 1863 and n. 1). 3 …
  • … words, printed here in roman type, were added in Emma Darwin’s hand at the end of one of the two …

British Association meeting 1860

Summary

Several letters refer to events at the British Association for the Advancement of Science held in Oxford, 26 June – 3 July 1860. Darwin had planned to attend the meeting but in the end was unable to. The most famous incident of the meeting was the verbal…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … of Science held in Oxford, 26 June – 3 July 1860. Darwin had planned to attend the meeting, having …
  • … his own poor health and that of his daughter, Henrietta Emma Darwin. Indeed, Darwin spent the week …
  • … the “debate” between Huxley and Wilberforce over Darwin’s theory were not well reported in the …
  • … 1914, 1: 50); John William Draper (Fleming 1950); and also Darwin ( LL  2: 320–3, F. Darwin ed. …
  • … debate, see Jensen 1988.) Discussions of Darwin’s theory that occurred in other sections of the …
  • … most complete contemporary report of the meeting and which Darwin himself read. Only those passages …
  • … of the Sexuality of Plants, with particular Reference to Mr. Darwin’s Work “”On the Origin of …
  • … remarked that if we adopt in any degree the views of Mr. Darwin with respect to the origin of …
  • … to fix the limits within which the doctrine proposed by Mr. Darwin may assist us in distinguishing …
  • … any discussion of the general question of the truth of Mr. Darwin’s theory. He felt that a general …
  • … with regard to the probabilities of the truth of Mr. Darwin’s theory. Whilst giving all praise to Mr …
  • … of Europe, considered with Reference to the Views of Mr. Darwin and others, that the Progression of …
  • … stated, he could not subscribe to the hypothesis of Mr. Darwin. His primordial germ had not been …
  • … of the other. In the great case of the pigeons quoted by Mr. Darwin, he admitted that no sooner were …
  • … in the closely-allied forms of the horse and the ass. Mr. Darwin’s conclusions were an hypothesis, …
  • … of science and humanity.— Prof. HUXLEY defended Mr. Darwin’s theory from the charge of its being …
  • … an undulation of light had never been arrested and measured. Darwin’s theory was an explanation of …
  • … Admiral FITZROY regretted the publication of Mr. Darwin’s book, and denied Prof. Huxley’s statement, …
  • … having asserted that all men of science were hostile to Mr. Darwin’s hypothesis,—whereas he himself …
  • … had, as it appeared to him, completely misunderstood Mr. Darwin’s hypothesis: his Lordship intimated …
  • … wholly opposed to the facts, reasonings, and results of Mr. Darwin’s work, that he could not …
  • … lead careful and philosophical naturalists to favour Mr. Darwin’s views. To this assertion Dr. …
  • … of varieties, and afforded the strongest countenance to Mr. Darwin’s hypothesis. As regarded his own …
  • … was neither more nor less entitled to acceptance than Mr. Darwin’s: neither was, in the present …
  • … fifteen years ago been privately made acquainted with Mr. Darwin’s views, he had during that period …
  • … and most different Floras at home. Now, then, that Mr. Darwin had published it, he had no hesitation …

Essay: What is Darwinism?

Summary

—by Asa Gray WHAT IS DARWINISM? The Nation, May 28, 1874 The question which Dr. Hodge asks he promptly and decisively answers: ‘What is Darwinism? it is atheism.’ Leaving aside all subsidiary and incidental matters, let us consider–1. What the…

Matches: 21 hits

  • … of it cannot be very much bettered: ‘ His [Darwin's] work on the “ Origin of …
  • … it is very different from the cognate works of Mr. Spencer. Darwin does not speculate on the origin …
  • … . . . To account for the existence of matter and life, Mr. Darwin admits a Creator. This is done …
  • … (pp. 26-29). Now, the truth or the probability of Darwin’s hypothesis is not here the …
  • … atheism is infused into the premises in a negative form: Mr. Darwin shows no disposition to resolve …
  • … Next (on page 48) comes the positive charge that ‘ Mr. Darwin, although himself a theist, ’ …
  • … might suffice to recall Dr. Hodge’s truthful remark that Darwin ‘ is simply a naturalist, ’ and …
  • … nor are they misjudged by the omission. But surely Mr. Darwin does show the disposition which our …
  • … take for such and require to be taken for granted, so Mr. Darwin postulates, upon the first page of …
  • … does to effect it for once. ’[VIII-2] So when Mr. Darwin makes such large and free use of ‘ …
  • … or by process of evolution. ’ But, as we have seen, Mr. Darwin does say that, and he over and over …
  • … to be proved is, that it is the distinctive doctrine of Mr. Darwin that species owe their origin–1. …
  • … to their subjects. ’ Then Dr. Hodge adduces ‘ Darwin’s own testimony, ’ to the purport that …
  • … to. It seems to us that only one of the three points which Darwin is said to deny is really opposed …
  • … operative efficiency of God. ’- One or both of these Mr. Darwin (being, as Dr. Hodge says, a theist …
  • … of species to conditions is brought about. Now, Mr. Darwin thinks–and by this he is distinguished. …
  • … it will explain very much, it is to be expected that Mr. Darwin will make the most of it. Doubtless …
  • … Here, at length, we reach the essential difference between Darwin, as we understand him, and Dr. …
  • … the Darwinian. Moreover, it is not certain that Mr. Darwin would very much better his case, …
  • … Thomson, Herschel, Argyll, Owen, Mivart, Wallace, and Darwin, down to those of Strauss, Vogt, and …
  • … “ Not in the least. ” We might accept all that Mr. Darwin, all that Prof. Huxley, all that other …

Essay: Natural selection & natural theology

Summary

—by Asa Gray NATURAL SELECTION NOT INCONSISTENT WITH NATURAL THEOLOGY. Atlantic Monthly for July, August, and October, 1860, reprinted in 1861. I Novelties are enticing to most people; to us they are simply annoying. We cling to a long-accepted…

Matches: 31 hits

  • … follows another, the chapter on ‘Natural Selection,’ Darwin’s  cheval de bataille , which is very …
  • … is some truth on both sides. ‘Natural selection,’ Darwin remarks, ‘leads to divergence of …
  • … it always works for good: if not, the divergent lines on Darwin’s lithographic diagram of …
  • … No doubt, the full development and symmetry of Darwin’s hypothesis strongly suggest the evolution of …
  • … recurrence of theories upon this genetic basis. A study of Darwin’s book, and a general glance at …
  • … of his own conceiving, which may yet see the light, although Darwin’s came first to the birth. …
  • … turn the point of a pungent simile directed against Darwin—the difference between the Darwinian and …
  • … if not general, acceptance in physical geology, and of which Darwin’s theory is the natural …
  • … of Pictet, the Swiss paleontologist. In his review of Darwin’s book — the fairest and most admirable …
  • … accepts that  ensemble  of natural operations which Darwin impersonates under the now familiar …
  • … But while thus accepting, or ready to accept, the basis of Darwin’s theory, and all its legitimate …
  • … We hope he can. This raises the question, Why does Darwin press his theory to these extreme …
  • … as Pictet allow that it may be true—perhaps as far as Darwin himself unfolds it in the introductory …
  • … We can barely glance at some of the considerations which Darwin adduces, or will be sure to adduce …
  • … proofs to justify the possibility of his hypothesis, Mr. Darwin relies upon indirect proofs, the …
  • … any other scientific assumption. We have said that Darwin’s hypothesis is the natural …
  • … solid whole. If we allow, with Pictet, that Darwin’s theory will very well serve for all that …
  • … includes the diluvial or quaternary period—then Darwin’s first and foremost need in his onward …
  • … descendants of the present day affords no argument against Darwin’s theory, as has been rashly …
  • … shells than between various individuals of either, then Darwin’s opponents, who argue the …
  • … seen that the judicious Pictet answers such questions as Darwin would have him do, in affirming that …
  • … or forms as different as species. This concedes all that Darwin has a right to ask, all that he can …
  • … by natural consequence of the struggle for existence which Darwin so aptly portrays. And so, perhaps …
  • … read them in Agassiz’s book will read their fulfillment in Darwin’s. Note also, in this …
  • … science. This is the extreme opposite of Wallace’s and Darwin’s view, and is quite as hypothetical. …
  • … general sketch of some geological considerations in favor of Darwin’s hypothesis has so extended as …
  • … great facts of comparative anatomy and zoology’ with which Darwin’s theory ‘very well accords,’ nor …
  • … metaphors, but unaware of the grounds of their aptness. Mr. Darwin assures them that they have been …
  • … course, be interpreted upon other assumptions than those of Darwin’s hypothesis—certainly upon quite …
  • … the general facts correspond well with an hypothesis like Darwin’s, which is built upon fine …
  • … which they seem to involve. We feel, moreover, that Darwin’s particular hypothesis is exposed to …

Review: The Origin of Species

Summary

- by Asa Gray THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES BY MEANS OF NATURAL SELECTION (American Journal of Science and Arts, March, 1860) This book is already exciting much attention. Two American editions are announced, through which it will become familiar to many…

Matches: 30 hits

  • … in Nature among races in the struggle for life, which Mr. Darwin describes; through which the views …
  • … with a doctrine so thoroughly naturalistic as that of Mr. Darwin. Though it is just possible that …
  • … view the well-known theory of Agassiz and the recent one of Darwin diverge in exactly opposite …
  • … as it numbered at any subsequent period. Mr. Darwin, on the other hand, holds the orthodox …
  • … world as equally primordial, equally supernatural; that of Darwin, as equally derivative, equally …
  • … back the series of cause and effect as far as possible, Darwin’s aim and processes are strictly …
  • … But, however originated, and whatever be thought of Mr. Darwin’s arduous undertaking in this respect …
  • … of individuals and species on the earth’s surface. Mr. Darwin thinks that, acting upon an inherent …
  • … theories, but struck with the eminent ability of Mr. Darwin’s work, and charmed with its fairness, …
  • … species, according to the bent of the naturalist’s mind. Darwin’s theory brings us the other way to …
  • … resemblance among species, have a literal meaning upon Darwin’s system, which they little suspected, …
  • … simile of a genealogical tree illustrates the main ideas of Darwin’s theory the following extract …
  • … why  or  how . Now the latter is just what Mr. Darwin is considering. He conceives of a …
  • … is quite another thing. This brings us to consider what Darwin’s theory actually is, and how he …
  • … of the proposition instead of an explanation. Mr. Darwin attempts both lines of proof, and in a …
  • … the whole aspect of the case. It is with the latter that Mr. Darwin now reopens the discussion. …
  • … the tendency to vary is general, and even universal. Mr. Darwin does ‘not believe that variability …
  • … probably the blood of more than one species is mingled, Mr. Darwin proceeds to show, adducing cogent …
  • …   The actual causes of variation are unknown. Mr. Darwin favors the opinion of the late Mr. …
  • … view seemingly all the more favorable to Mr. Darwin’s theory. The actual amount of certain changes, …
  • … inheritance are apparently inscrutable. ‘Perhaps,’ Darwin remarks, ‘the correct way of viewing the …
  • … if there is a true reversion in the case of plants. Mr. Darwin’s observations rather favor it in the …
  • … in numerous cases where it is not structurally—Mr. Darwin has worked out the subject in detail, and …
  • … in the long-run may answer to artificial selection? Mr. Darwin thinks that there is; and  Natural …
  • … his principle of natural selection to the work in hand, Mr. Darwin assumes, as we have seen: i. Some …
  • … of such association is undeniable; and the use which Mr. Darwin makes of it seems fair and natural. …
  • … beings tend to increase. Curiously enough, Mr. Darwin’s theory is grounded upon the doctrine …
  • … use of it. But Hobbes in his theory of society, and Darwin in his theory of natural history, alone …
  • … the organic world in general is now undeniable. And to Mr. Darwin belongs the credit of making this …
  • … distribution which would still remain anomalous, Mr. Darwin is equally bound to account for the …

Vivisection: first sketch of the bill

Summary

Strictly Confidential Mem: This print is only a first sketch. It is being now recast with a new & more simple form – but the substance of the proposed measure may be equally well seen in this draft. R.B.L. | 2 586 Darwin and vivisection …

Matches: 1 hits

  • … well seen in this draft. R.B.L. | 2 586 Darwin and vivisection …
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