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Darwin’s hothouse and lists of hothouse plants

Summary

Darwin became increasingly involved in botanical experiments in the years after the publication of Origin. The building of a small hothouse - a heated greenhouse - early in 1863  greatly increased the range of plants that he could keep for scientific…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … Towards the end of 1862, Darwin resolved to build a small hothouse at Down House, for ‘experimental …
  • … hothouse early in 1863 marked something of a milestone in Darwin’s botanical work, since it greatly …
  • …  vol. 5, letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 April [1855] ). Darwin became increasingly involved in …
  • … Though his greenhouse was probably heated to some extent, Darwin found himself on several occasions …
  • … make observations and even experiments on his behalf. Darwin’s decision to build a hothouse …
  • … Hooker, 12 [December 1862] and n. 13). Initially, Darwin purchased for this purpose a glass …
  • … of 24 December [1862] ( Correspondence  vol. 10) Darwin told Hooker: I have …
  • … Encyclopedia of gardening  (Loudon 1835), a copy of which Darwin signed in 1841 (see the copy in …
  • … of heat’ (p. 1100). The latter was the sense in which Darwin used the word. The building of …
  • … accounts (Down House MS)). When it was completed, Darwin told Turnbull that without Horwood’s aid he …
  • … ). Even before work on the hothouse started, however, Darwin began making preparations to …
  • … plants’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January [1863] ). Darwin apparently refers to the catalogues …
  • … whom he had dealt over many years. In his letter to Hooker, Darwin mentioned that he hoped to be …
  • … (letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 January 1863] ). Darwin agreed to send Hooker his list of …
  • … (letter to J. D. Hooker, 30 January [1863] ). Darwin probably gave his list of plants to …
  • … [1863] ). On 20 February, the plants from Kew had arrived. Darwin was delighted, telling Hooker: ‘I …
  • … moss, peat, and charcoal (see the letter from Henrietta Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [22 …
  • … (see letter from J. D. Hooker, [6 March 1863] ). Darwin derived enormous pleasure from his …
  • … (letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] ). Darwin’s aesthetic appreciation of the …
  • … the tropics. Even before he left on the Beagle  voyage, Darwin used the hothouses in the …
  • … (see  Correspondence  vol. 1, letter to Caroline Darwin, [28 April 1831] ), and when, on the  …
  • … again’ ( Correspondence  vol. 1, letter to Catherine Darwin, May–June [1832] ). Years later, …
  • … 8 October [1845] ). Having indulged his senses, Darwin soon began the more serious work of …
  • … department at Kew, had helped select the plants for Darwin). Hooker had also sent seeds, and was …
  • … (letter to J. D. Hooker, 21 February [1863] ). Darwin’s hothouse became an important focus …

Instinct and the Evolution of Mind

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Slave-making ants For Darwin, slave-making ants were a powerful example of the force of instinct. He used the case of the ant Formica sanguinea in the On the Origin of Species to show how instinct operates—how…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … | Experiment Slave-making ants For Darwin, slave-making ants were a powerful …
  • … speculate about how it might have developed evolutionarily. Darwin corresponded about slave-making …
  • … with entomological experts who classified the ant species Darwin collected and advised him on how …
  • … in 1859, friends, acquaintances, and strangers wrote to Darwin about his treatment of the remarkable …
  • … Russel Wallace. The case of F. sanguinea intrigued Darwin's network of scientific …
  • … SOURCES Books Darwin, Charles. On the Origin of Species . 1859. London: John …
  • … Manuscripts Excerpts from Charles Darwin's Notebook C , p. 166 Excerpts …
  • … of Mind Letter 2226 —Frederick Smith to Darwin, 26 Feb 1858 In this letter, …
  • … Museum, identifies the species of an ant described by Darwin in a previous letter and advises him on …
  • … activities of F. sanguinea . Letter 2235 —Darwin to Frederick Smith, [before 9 Mar …
  • … mostly about the behavior of slave-making ants, which Darwin sent Smith. Darwin routinely sent …
  • … only to Smith. Letter 2456 —Frederick Smith to Darwin, 30 Apr 1859 Here Smith …
  • … known habitat in Britain. Letter 2265 —Charles Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [26 Apr …
  • … from other communities. Letter 2306 —Charles Darwin to Joseph Hooker, 13 [July 1858] …

Darwin and religion: a definitive web resource

Summary

I am aware that if we admit a first cause, the mind still craves to know whence it came and how it arose.  Charles Darwin to N. D. Doedes, 2 April 1873 Darwin is more famous, and more notorious than ever. Nowhere is this more evident than in the…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … it came and how it arose.   Charles Darwin to N. D. Doedes, 2 April 1873 …
  • … roots in the nineteenth-century controversies surrounding Darwin’s work on evolution. Yet Darwin is …
  • … in order to support a particular position. Whose Darwin is the true Darwin, and what are the …
  • … available key letters on on science and religion from Darwin's correspondence. The work was …
  • … ' Religion ' pages on this site.  The aim of the 'Darwin and religion' …
  • … through the engagement of the present with the past. Darwin’s letters provide a unique resource for …
  • … on people from a wide range of backgrounds. The picture that Darwin’s letters present of his …
  • … or indeed in most modern scholarship. At least 200 of Darwin’s correspondents were clergymen, …
  • … for morality and religious belief. The letters show that Darwin’s work could mean many different …
  • … of a fascinating series of letters exchanged between Darwin and his friend Asa Gray, Harvard …
  • … essay prize offered for the most interesting exploration of Darwin’s correspondence in the context …

What Darwin Read

Summary

Follow the links to resources about the books and papers, mostly scientific, that Darwin read as student at Edinburgh, during the Beagle voyage, and later in his life. Darwin and his family also read works of fiction by Anthony Trollope, George Eliot,…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … about the books and papers, mostly scientific, that Darwin read as student at Edinburgh, during the …

Darwin's 1874 letters go online

Summary

The full transcripts and footnotes of over 600 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1874 are published online for the first time. You can read about Darwin's life in 1874 through his letters and see a full list of the letters. The 1874 letters…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … and footnotes of over 600 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1874 are published online for …
  • … the Catholic zoologist St George Jackson Mivart caused Darwin and his son George. In an …
  • … licentiousness’. After re-reading what George had written, Darwin wrote:   I cannot …
  • … of [a] lying scoundrel.—  ( Letter to G. H. Darwin, 1 August [1874] ) The …
  • … behaviour in scientific society. Find out more about how Darwin and his family and friends dealt …
  • … W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ) At the age of 65, Darwin had reflective moments, although his …
  • … Letter to D. F. Nevill, 18 September [1874] ) Darwin’s family continued to prosper. His …
  • … ‘I am sure he will never voluntarily be idle’, wrote Darwin to the directors, fearing that Horace …
  • … career, married Amy Ruck and came to live in Down village as Darwin’s secretary. I …
  • … Letter to J. D. Hooker, 30 November [1874] ) Darwin’s continuing loyalty to his friends …
  • … in his post as director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Darwin used what influence he could to …

Darwin and the Church

Summary

The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It shows another side of the man who is more often remembered for his personal struggles with faith, or for his role in large-scale controversies over the…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It …
  • … unique window into this complicated relationship throughout Darwin’s life, as it reveals his …
  • … belief (and doubt) than many non-conformist denominations. Darwin’s parents attended a Unitarian …
  • … the necessary studies to be a clergyman. During Darwin’s lifetime, the vast majority of the …
  • … income was essential to enjoy a gentlemanly lifestyle. For Darwin, who could rely on the financial …
  • … compatible with the pursuit of scientific interests. Indeed, Darwin’s Cambridge mentor, John Stevens …
  • … (Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (1887): 321). Darwin started on his journey around the world …
  • … it even through a grove of Palms.—’ (letter to Caroline Darwin, 25–6 April [1832] ). Darwin’s …
  • … Museum or some other learned place’ (letter from E. A. Darwin, 18 August [1832] ). Writing to Fox …
  • … about—’ (letter to W. D. Fox, [9–12 August] 1835 ). Darwin’s doubts about orthodox belief, and …
  • … in 1838 and 1839, as can be read here. In the end, Darwin chose a middle course—a life of ease in …
  • … within six years of his return from the  Beagle  voyage, Darwin moved to Down House, in the …
  • … where their children Mary and Charles were buried; later Darwin’s brother Erasmus, Emma’s sister …
  • … of Emma, whose religious scruples are discussed here. But Darwin’s correspondence reveals his own …
  • … Although he was not the principal landowner in Down, Darwin was a gentleman of means, and clearly …
  • … made inroads on Anglican authority in the countryside. The Darwin family took an interest in, and …
  • … Many of the letters highlighted in this section focus on Darwin’s long-standing relationship with …
  • … To the end of his life Innes refused to be persuaded by Darwin’s theory of evolution, but …
  • … cordial; in the first extant letter of the correspondence, Darwin wrote to Innes expressing concern …
  • … to 1869 (letter to J. B. Innes, [8 May 1848] and n. 2). Darwin praised Innes to John William …
  • … from Down (letter to J. B. Innes, 15 December [1861] ). Darwin and Innes continued to correspond …
  • … Innes, 7 December 1868 ). Innes had a tendency to tease Darwin about his theories rather than …

3.5 William Darwin, photo 2

Summary

< Back to Introduction Darwin’s son William, who had become a banker in Southampton, took the opportunity of a short visit home to Down House in April 1864 to photograph his father afresh. This half-length portrait was the first to show Darwin with a…

Matches: 21 hits

  • … < Back to Introduction Darwin’s son William, who had become a banker in Southampton, …
  • … afresh. This half-length portrait was the first to show Darwin with a recently grown beard, and …
  • … out’ for copies, and would be ‘enchanted’ by Darwin’s new persona. When Asa Gray received the …
  • … from Christ’s College days, Benjamin Dann Walsh, thought Darwin looked little changed, except for …
  • … Naudin also received copies of William’s photograph, Darwin explaining to the latter that he had ‘no …
  • … features of ‘Ignorant’, ‘Insane’ and ‘Idiotic’. Darwin himself, in a letter of 1848, had jested that …
  • … of course more fashionable, but the dramatic luxuriance of Darwin’s beard (untrimmed except round …
  • … of technical polish and its blurred, shadowy tones, William Darwin’s photograph of his father was …
  • … vignette version of it to illustrate an article, ‘Darwin and his teachings’, in The Quarterly …
  • … was a cause of later confusion). According to a letter from Darwin’s daughter Henrietta to her …
  • … of Origin published in 1867, again with a facsimile of Darwin’s signature, and this was re-used …
  • … to Asa Gray, and referred to in Gray’s correspondence with Darwin, can be tentatively  identified …
  • … It is simply inscribed by hand on the back in pencil ‘C. Darwin 1864’ – the accuracy of the dating …
  • … any public collection.   physical location Darwin archive, Cambridge University …
  • … Library 
 originator of image William Erasmus Darwin  
 date of creation April …
  • … Harvard University, about the uncatalogued photograph of Darwin there, which is in the Jane Gray …
  • … and Gray’s reply, 11 July 1864 (DCP-LETT-4558). Darwin’s letter to Hooker, 10 June [1864], enclosing …
  • … and Hooker’s reply, [11 June 1864] (DCP-LETT-4529). Darwin’s letter to Naudin, 8 Dec. [1864] (DCP …
  • … June 1865 (DCP-LETT-4863). Letter from Benjamin D. Walsh to Darwin, 1 March 1865 (DCP-LETT-4778). …
  • … Journal of Science , 3:10 (April 1866), facing p. 151. Darwin, über die Entstehung der Arten …
  • … Browne, ‘”I could have retched all night”: Charles Darwin and his body’, in Christopher Lawrence and …

Origin is 160; Darwin's 1875 letters now online

Summary

To mark the 160th anniversary of the publication of Origin of species, the full transcripts and footnotes of nearly 650 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1875 are published online for the first time. You can read about Darwin's life in 1875…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … and footnotes of nearly 650 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1875 are published online …
  • … printings before the end of the year. At the same time, Darwin was writing Cross and self …
  • … Royal Commission that was set up to look into the subject. Darwin’s second visit of the year to …
  • … and others at the Brown Institution, London, had assisted Darwin with his experiments on the …
  • … of animals when performing a painful experiment. Huxley told Darwin about Klein’s testimony: ‘ I …
  • … to any law, which should send him to the treadmill. ’ Darwin replied to Huxley: ‘ I am astounded …
  • … ( Letter to R. F. Cooke, 29 June [1875] ) Darwin wrote this to his publisher in June …
  • … Letter to J. D. Hooker, 18 August [1875] ) Darwin also completed second editions of …
  • … Frances Power Cobbe, a journalist and an acquaintance of Darwin’s, raised a petition and managed to …
  • … the matter was referred to a Royal Commission, before which Darwin gave evidence. An appendix on the …
  • … to be poor. John Lubbock, another local landowner and Darwin’s friend, attempted to make peace, …
  • … as yours almost always succeeds  ( Letter to G. H. Darwin, 13 October [1875] ) Darwin
  • … was an impassable barrier between animals and humans. Darwin’s son Francis, who was working as his …
  • … The year was saddened by the death of several of Darwin’s correspondents, including one of his …
  • … [12 December 1875] ) In December, Darwin was involved in more controversy. He was …

Darwin The Collector

Summary

Look at nature more closely and create and record your own natural collections.

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Activities provide an introduction to Charles Darwin, how and why he collected so many specimens …

Darwin’s species notebooks: ‘I think . . .’

Summary

I have lately been sadly tempted to be idle, that is as far as pure geology is concerned, by the delightful number of new views, which have been coming in, thickly & steadily, on the classification & affinities & instincts of animals—bearing…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … 1837, living in London and just off the  Beagle , Darwin began tackling the problem of the …
  • … to his discovery of natural selection. Projects that Darwin would pursue in correspondence …
  • … documents. Like his letters, the notebooks show Darwin in constant conversation. Darwin did …
  • … of naturalists, geologists, economists and philosophers. Darwin jotted down the records of …
  • … of social interaction. The notebooks also show Darwin changing his mind. Initially he …
  • … on ideas from his grandfather, the evolutionary poet Erasmus Darwin. The early notebooks thus focus …
  • … line; existing ones are shown to continue. At this stage in Darwin’s thinking, it was important that …
  • … Applying the Malthusian doctrine to the whole living world, Darwin realized that only the best …
  • … would lead to the formation of new species. This was Darwin’s theory of natural selection …

Darwin and religion in America

Summary

Thomas Dixon, 'America’s Difficulty with Darwin', History Today (2009), reproduced by permission.  Darwin has not been forgotten. But he has, in some respects, been misremembered. That has certainly been true when it comes to the relationship…

Matches: 19 hits

  • … America’s Difficulty with Darwin Thomas Dixon __________ Does anything …
  • … does not seem to be any danger of the world forgetting who Darwin was, or how his theory of …
  • … around with us in our pockets: an iconic image of Darwin, looking like a cross between Socrates and …
  • … resurgence of enthusiasm for the idea of a conflict between Darwin and God. Battle has been joined …
  • … we examine the peculiarly American religious response to Darwin in more detail, let us return …
  • … throughout their marriage. Religious controversy would also, Darwin knew, be inimical to the …
  • … in God. We can, thanks to the labours of a group of Darwin scholars at Cambridge University …
  • … Bromley, Kent, October 1 st , 1859.’ Down House was Darwin’s home, a rural retreat where he …
  • … gentleman naturalist, was not a manifesto for atheism. Darwin had read the book of nature and found …
  • … Origin of Species , we find the same message restated. Darwin wrote that ‘it accords better with …
  • … ennobled.’ In the famous final sentence of the book, Darwin concluded: ‘There is grandeur in this …
  • … being, evolved.’ From the second edition of 1860 onwards, Darwin altered the phrase ‘breathed into a …
  • … implications of the Darwinian view of nature, including Darwin himself, who, in private, was …
  • … (one of thousands that can now be read online thanks to the Darwin Correspondence Project), he wrote …
  • … correct description of my state of mind.’ Whatever Darwin’s own doubts, by 1882 most …
  • … religious worries about evolution, and a famous spat between Darwin’s friend Thomas Huxley and the …
  • … Frederick Farrar assured the assembled dignitaries that Darwin’s theory posed no threat to belief in …
  • … Bible describing the wisdom of Solomon, which he applied to Darwin: ‘He spake of trees, from the …
  • … find that about half of the population deny the truth of Darwin’s theory and believe, instead, that …

Darwin and dogs

Summary

Darwin was almost always in the company of dogs. Nina, Spark, Pincher, and Shiela. Snow, Dash, Bob, and Bran. The beloved terrier Polly (right). They were Darwin's constant companions at home and in the field, on walks and in sport, in his study and…

Matches: 11 hits

  • Darwin was almost always in the company of dogs. Nina, Spark, Pincher, and …
  • … Bob, and Bran. The beloved terrier Polly (right). They were Darwin's constant companions at …
  • … the fireside. They were also fascinating objects of study. Darwin observed their variations in breed …
  • … those of humans.   In his youth, Darwin was passionate about hunting. When …
  • … pitch of joy: " If there is bliss on earth, that is it ". Darwin's experience with …
  • … and habit, were fitted to run down hare. Darwin also studied the social behaviour …
  • … "It is curious to speculate on the feelings of a dog," Darwin wrote, "who will rest …
  • … Gone for a walk: the empty dog bed by the fire in Darwin's study. In Descent of Man , …
  • … the passing temptation of hunting it." ( Descent 2: 392) Darwin argued that dogs could …
  • … by his love of dogs and his belief in their moral sense, Darwin became involved in a campaign to …
  • … Henrietta and Polly at Down House. Darwin's favourite dog of all was Polly. He adopted …

Darwin soundbites

Summary

From atheistical cats to old fogies in Cambridge, we've collected some of Darwin's pithier remarks - some funny, some serious - but all quotes from letters you can read in full here. We particularly like this one: Will you be so kind as…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … cats to old fogies in Cambridge, we've collected some of Darwin's pithier remarks - some …
  • … legible. Where's it from? Not seen Darwin’s handwriting? – try reading …
  • … life is one of ceasless trouble & anxiety. (Darwin misspelled 'ceaseless', …
  • … on my armour.— Where's it from? Darwin on Life (and being a modified ape) …

Darwin's 1876 letters online

Summary

Birth, tragic death . . . and cardigan jackets. To mark the 211th anniversary of Darwin's birth, we have released online the transcripts and footnotes of over 460 letters written to and from him in 1876 and a supplement of 180 letters written before…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … . . . and cardigan jackets. To mark the 211th anniversary of Darwin's birth, we have released …
  • … of 180 letters written before 1876. Read more about Darwin's life in 1876 and see  a full …
  • … The year 1876 started energetically, with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the …
  • … in August and the book was published by John Murray, Darwin’s usual publisher, in November; he …
  • … quantity of work left in me for new matter. Darwin had to be disciplined about his urge …
  • … second edition of Orchids was published in January 1877; Darwin had been working on it since May …
  • … Annie’s death, though not so grievous to me. Darwin’s daughter-in-law, Amy, died a few …
  • … from a recently discovered collection of letters to Charles Darwin from his son William. They reveal …

Power of movement in plants

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Family experiments Darwin was an active and engaged father during his children's youth, involving them in his experiments and even occasionally using them as observational subjects. When his children…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … | Experiment Family experiments Darwin was an active and engaged father during …
  • … Man (1872). This teaching module focuses on work done by Darwin with his son Francis on …
  • … and his role as an attentive and affectionate father. Darwin's letters to Francis mix advice on …
  • … notice that although they come from the last decade of Darwin’s life, he is still interested in his …
  • … move In The Power of movement in plants Darwin continued his experiments with and …
  • … in behavioral responses. In the conclusion of the book Darwin argues that gradual modifications in …
  • … SOURCES Books Darwin, C.R. The power of movement in plants. 1880. London: …
  • … of movement in plants Letter 7346 - Darwin to Francis Darwin, 18 October 1870 …
  • … also sends along the money to help Francis clear his debt. Darwin cautions Francis that he knows of …
  • … compromising their character. Letter 10517 - Darwin to Francis Darwin, 29 May 1876 …
  • … experimental technique. Letter 11586 - Darwin to Francis Darwin, 2 July 1878 …
  • … be worth making. Letter 11628 - Francis Darwin to Darwin, 24 July 1878 …
  • … floppy to work”. Letter 12152 - Francis Darwin to Darwin, 12 July 1879 …
  • … in plants. By the time this letter was written, he and Darwin were well into the publishing stage …
  • … it is important to study these later, specialised books by Darwin? What do you think these books can …

Before Origin: the ‘big book’

Summary

Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the very day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles (Darwin's Journal). He had long considered the question of species. In 1842, he outlined a theory of transmutation in a…

Matches: 26 hits

  • Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the …
  • … day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles ( Darwin's Journal ). He had long …
  • … to paper in a more substantial essay. By this point, Darwin had also admitted to his close friend …
  • … he acknowledged, ‘ like confessing a murder ’. While Darwin recognised he had far more work to do …
  • … reaction to the transmutation theory it contained convinced Darwin that further evidence for the …
  • … of Vestiges to him. It took another ten years before Darwin felt ready to start collating his …
  • … six months before he started sorting his species notes, Darwin had worried that the process would …
  • … explodes like an empty puff-ball ’, he told Hooker. Darwin’s concern may have stemmed from …
  • … immutability of species ’, he told his cousin William Darwin Fox. Experimental work …
  • … set up to provide crucial evidence for his arguments. Fox, Darwin assumed, would have bred pigeons …
  • … intensely bred to exaggerate particular characters, would, Darwin believed, clearly exhibit the …
  • … amusement’ and be a ‘ horrid bore ’. Contrary to Darwin’s expectations, however, the pigeon …
  • … Henrietta . In April 1855, at the same time as Darwin began his pigeon breeding programme, …
  • … Hoping to benefit from Hooker’s botanical expertise, Darwin inquired: ‘ will you tell me at a …
  • … land bridges suggested by the naturalist Edward Forbes. Darwin declared to Hooker in July 1856 ‘y …
  • … to me, & yet I cannot honestly admit the doctrine ’. Darwin thought Forbes’ hypothesis ‘ an …
  • … of untying it. ’ Persuading men of science Darwin’s patient untying of the knot of …
  • … about the permanence of species.— By 1857, Darwin had found the confidence to describe his …
  • … of fellow naturalists. Gray’s response was everything Darwin must have hoped for. Stating that his …
  • … definiteness of species’, Gray expressed his interest in Darwin’s work because it began with ‘ good …
  • … ’ However, it was not responses like this that led Darwin to ask that his species theory still be …
  • … had gone through ten editions and was still selling well. Darwin was worried about plagiarism and …
  • … by those alone whose opinion I value.— ‘ Darwin’s increasing confidence was built on the …
  • … Charles Lyell, who, in May 1856, twenty months after Darwin had begun sorting his species notes, …
  • … writing and publishing a ‘sketch’ of his theory ( Darwin's Journal ). Just a month …
  • … up the idea of publishing your views upon it’, he urged Darwin,’tho’ neither you nor any one else …

The full edition is now online!

Summary

For nearly fifty years successive teams of researchers on both sides of the Atlantic have been working to track down all surviving letters written by or to Charles Darwin, research their content, and publish the complete texts. The thirtieth and final…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … to track down all surviving letters written by or to Charles Darwin, research their content, and …
  • … picture than we have ever had before of the course of Darwin’s life and development of his thought. …
  • … the last 6 years. Those 400 letters flesh out the whole of Darwin’s life from his time on board HMS  …
  • … volume.  Discover more about the final months of Darwin's life in our Life and Letters …
  • … Lawson Tait, 13 February 1882 In early 1882, Darwin, who turned 73 in February, was …
  • … Letter to John Murray, 21 January 1882 Darwin was by now confident that belief in …
  • … Letter to T. H. Huxley, 27 March 1882 Darwin wrote this to Thomas Henry Huxley at the …
  • … children it is worth having .’ Letter from Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, [20 April 1882] …
  • … the correspondence for 1882. The family had expected Darwin to be buried in Down, but within days, …

Movement in Plants

Summary

The power of movement in plants, published on 7 November 1880, was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which the assistance of one of his children, Francis Darwin, is mentioned on the title page. The research for this…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … 7 November 1880, was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which …
  • … about their research while he was away from home. Although Darwin lacked a state of the art research …
  • … the advantages of both while Francis was working abroad. Darwin was privy to the inner workings of …
  • … methods and use the most advanced laboratory equipment. Darwin also benefitted from the instrument …
  • … that Francis had been introduced to at Würzburg. Darwin described his experimental practice …
  • … plant physiology, but it was at its core informed by Darwin’s theory of evolution, particularly by …
  • … early 1860s, at a time when his health was especially bad, Darwin had taken up the study of climbing …
  • … reproduced as a small book, giving it a much wider audience. Darwin was not the first naturalist to …
  • … which eventually appeared in 1875. In the same year, Darwin published a much longer work,  …
  • … about the nature of movement, so much so, that at one point Darwin had considered combining the …
  • … digestive processes. With his final great botanical work, Darwin would attempt ‘ to bring all the …
  • … emotions had their origins in non-human animal expression. Darwin had not done experimental work in …
  • … viewed the division between animals and plants as absolute, Darwin was interested in similarities. …
  • … become adapted to perform new functions, like climbing? For Darwin, physiology was a way of seeing …
  • … attracting students from all over Europe and beyond. When Darwin’s son Francis worked in this …
  • …   ‘Mad about drops of water’ Darwin’s interest in the diversified movements of …
  • … connection is revealed only though correspondence because Darwin never published on bloom. In August …
  • … focusing light rays, and burn sections of the leaf blade. Darwin asked whether Farrer’s gardener had …
  • … sun. It is a splendid subject for experiments ’.  Darwin was clearly intrigued by bloom, but …
  • … to discuss the point with his friend Francis Balfour(258). Darwin promised to reflect on Balfour’s …
  • … Given that the function of bloom appeared to be protective, Darwin began to consider what other …
  • … as a protection against rain lodging on the leaves ’. Darwin then studied an even more interesting …
  • … syringing we could give them elicited movement ’. Darwin, however, had to finish his work on …
  • … to my heart ’. It would be another three years before Darwin would resume work on movement and …
  • … am very doubtful of any success. '. Just two months later, Darwin put Francis in charge of …
  • … Movement in plants , p. 300. Darwin now began to study so-called sleep in plants (the change …

Darwin on race and gender

Summary

Darwin’s views on race and gender are intertwined, and mingled also with those of class. In Descent of man, he tried to explain the origin of human races, and many of the differences between the sexes, with a single theory: sexual selection. Sexual…

Matches: 19 hits

  • Darwin’s views on race and gender are intertwined, and mingled also with …
  • … in beetles. The unity of human species Darwin believed that the same process of sexual …
  • … gradually increase those features over long periods of time. Darwin’s theory was based partly on the …
  • … seemed to prevail across the globe. In Descent , Darwin also addressed widely held beliefs …
  • … of ‘species’, ‘varieties’, and ‘races’. Darwin argued forcefully for the unity of the human species, …
  • … Gender and civilisation In his early notebooks, Darwin remarked that survival value or …
  • … , B74). In his later writings on plants and animals, Darwin remained consistent on this point, and …
  • … improvement, or design. However, when it came to humans, Darwin reintroduced the structure of …
  • … and present, on the basis of their ‘civilization’. Here Darwin drew on contemporary anthropology, …
  • … colonial conquests and expansion abroad. Thus, while Darwin’s views on race differed widely …
  • … in the success of nations’ ( Descent 1: 239). For Darwin, the civilising process was essentially …
  • … taken from their homeland in Tierra del Fuego to England, Darwin wrote: ‘in contradiction of what …
  • … Press. Desmond, Adrian and James Moore. 2009. Darwin's sacred cause . London: Allen …
  • … of Science 6: 9–23 [in a special issue on ‘Descent of Darwin: race, sex, and human nature’]. …
  • … . New York: The Free Press. Voss, Julia. 2007, Darwin’s pictures: views of evolutionary …
  • … women Key letters : Letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] Letter …
  • … 28 January 1882 Further Reading: Darwin, Descent of man (1871), 2: 326–9. …
  • … Hamlin, Kimberly. 2014. From Eve to evolution: Darwin, science, and women’s rights in gilded age …
  • … Palgrave Macmillan. Richards, Evelleen. 2017. Darwin and the making of sexual selection . …

Volume appendices

Summary

Here is a list of the appendices from the print volumes of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin with links to adapted online versions where they are available. Appendix I in each volume contains translations of letters in foreign languages and these can…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … from the print volumes of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin with links to adapted online …
  • … When not specified Appendix II is a chronology of Darwin’s life in the period covered by the volume, …
  • … 1 II Darwin’s Beagle records 1 III …
  • … 1 V Darwin’s early notes on coral reef formation …
  • … 2 IV Darwin’s notes on marriage 2 V …
  • … 2 VI Darwin and William Kemp on the vitality of seeds …
  • … 3 III Darwin’s notes arising from conversations with Joseph Dalton Hooker …
  • … 4 II Darwin’s study of the Cirripedia 4 …
  • … 5 II Death of Anne Elizabeth Darwin   …
  • … 6 III Dates of composition of Darwin’s manuscript on species …
  • … 7 III Abstract of Darwin’s species theory …
  • … 7 V Death of Charles Waring Darwin 7 VI …
  • … 9 V Correspondence between Erasmus Darwin and Josiah Wedgwood I, concerning …
  • … 9 X Darwin's memoir of John Stevens Henslow …
  • … 10 IX Diplomas presented to Charles Darwin   …
  • … Donald Beaton’s responses to Charles Darwin’s letters to the Journal of Horticulture …
  • … 12 IV Darwin and the Copley Medal   …
  • … 13 IV Note on Darwin’s health 13 V …
  • … 15 IV Darwin’s Queries about expression …
  • … 16 V Darwin's Queries about expression …
  • … 17 V Portrait of Charles Darwin by Laura Russell …
  • … 18 IV Darwin's Queries about expression …
  • … 19 VI Henrietta Emma Darwin’s journal 1871 …
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