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Darwin and religion in America

Summary

Thomas Dixon, 'America’s Difficulty with Darwin', History Today (2009), reproduced by permission.  Darwin has not been forgotten. But he has, in some respects, been misremembered. That has certainly been true when it comes to the relationship…

Matches: 19 hits

  • … America’s Difficulty with Darwin Thomas Dixon __________ Does anything …
  • … does not seem to be any danger of the world forgetting who Darwin was, or how his theory of …
  • … around with us in our pockets: an iconic image of Darwin, looking like a cross between Socrates and …
  • … resurgence of enthusiasm for the idea of a conflict between Darwin and God. Battle has been joined …
  • … we examine the peculiarly American religious response to Darwin in more detail, let us return …
  • … throughout their marriage. Religious controversy would also, Darwin knew, be inimical to the …
  • … in God. We can, thanks to the labours of a group of Darwin scholars at Cambridge University …
  • … Bromley, Kent, October 1 st , 1859.’ Down House was Darwin’s home, a rural retreat where he …
  • … gentleman naturalist, was not a manifesto for atheism. Darwin had read the book of nature and found …
  • … Origin of Species , we find the same message restated. Darwin wrote that ‘it accords better with …
  • … ennobled.’ In the famous final sentence of the book, Darwin concluded: ‘There is grandeur in this …
  • … being, evolved.’ From the second edition of 1860 onwards, Darwin altered the phrase ‘breathed into a …
  • … implications of the Darwinian view of nature, including Darwin himself, who, in private, was …
  • … (one of thousands that can now be read online thanks to the Darwin Correspondence Project), he wrote …
  • … correct description of my state of mind.’ Whatever Darwin’s own doubts, by 1882 most …
  • … religious worries about evolution, and a famous spat between Darwin’s friend Thomas Huxley and the …
  • … Frederick Farrar assured the assembled dignitaries that Darwin’s theory posed no threat to belief in …
  • … Bible describing the wisdom of Solomon, which he applied to Darwin: ‘He spake of trees, from the …
  • … find that about half of the population deny the truth of Darwin’s theory and believe, instead, that …

Darwin and dogs

Summary

Darwin was almost always in the company of dogs. Nina, Spark, Pincher, and Shiela. Snow, Dash, Bob, and Bran. The beloved terrier Polly (right). They were Darwin's constant companions at home and in the field, on walks and in sport, in his study and…

Matches: 11 hits

  • Darwin was almost always in the company of dogs. Nina, Spark, Pincher, and …
  • … Bob, and Bran. The beloved terrier Polly (right). They were Darwin's constant companions at …
  • … the fireside. They were also fascinating objects of study. Darwin observed their variations in breed …
  • … those of humans.   In his youth, Darwin was passionate about hunting. When …
  • … pitch of joy: " If there is bliss on earth, that is it ". Darwin's experience with …
  • … and habit, were fitted to run down hare. Darwin also studied the social behaviour …
  • … "It is curious to speculate on the feelings of a dog," Darwin wrote, "who will rest …
  • … Gone for a walk: the empty dog bed by the fire in Darwin's study. In Descent of Man , …
  • … the passing temptation of hunting it." ( Descent 2: 392) Darwin argued that dogs could …
  • … by his love of dogs and his belief in their moral sense, Darwin became involved in a campaign to …
  • … Henrietta and Polly at Down House. Darwin's favourite dog of all was Polly. He adopted …

Darwin soundbites

Summary

From atheistical cats to old fogies in Cambridge, we've collected some of Darwin's pithier remarks - some funny, some serious - but all quotes from letters you can read in full here. We particularly like this one: Will you be so kind as…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … cats to old fogies in Cambridge, we've collected some of Darwin's pithier remarks - some …
  • … legible. Where's it from? Not seen Darwin’s handwriting? – try reading …
  • … life is one of ceasless trouble & anxiety. (Darwin misspelled 'ceaseless', …
  • … on my armour.— Where's it from? Darwin on Life (and being a modified ape) …

Darwin's 1876 letters online

Summary

Birth, tragic death . . . and cardigan jackets. To mark the 211th anniversary of Darwin's birth, we have released online the transcripts and footnotes of over 460 letters written to and from him in 1876 and a supplement of 180 letters written before…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … . . . and cardigan jackets. To mark the 211th anniversary of Darwin's birth, we have released …
  • … of 180 letters written before 1876. Read more about Darwin's life in 1876 and see  a full …
  • … The year 1876 started energetically, with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the …
  • … in August and the book was published by John Murray, Darwin’s usual publisher, in November; he …
  • … quantity of work left in me for new matter. Darwin had to be disciplined about his urge …
  • … second edition of Orchids was published in January 1877; Darwin had been working on it since May …
  • … Annie’s death, though not so grievous to me. Darwin’s daughter-in-law, Amy, died a few …
  • … from a recently discovered collection of letters to Charles Darwin from his son William. They reveal …

Power of movement in plants

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Family experiments Darwin was an active and engaged father during his children's youth, involving them in his experiments and even occasionally using them as observational subjects. When his children…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … | Experiment Family experiments Darwin was an active and engaged father during …
  • … Man (1872). This teaching module focuses on work done by Darwin with his son Francis on …
  • … and his role as an attentive and affectionate father. Darwin's letters to Francis mix advice on …
  • … notice that although they come from the last decade of Darwin’s life, he is still interested in his …
  • … move In The Power of movement in plants Darwin continued his experiments with and …
  • … in behavioral responses. In the conclusion of the book Darwin argues that gradual modifications in …
  • … SOURCES Books Darwin, C.R. The power of movement in plants. 1880. London: …
  • … of movement in plants Letter 7346 - Darwin to Francis Darwin, 18 October 1870 …
  • … also sends along the money to help Francis clear his debt. Darwin cautions Francis that he knows of …
  • … compromising their character. Letter 10517 - Darwin to Francis Darwin, 29 May 1876 …
  • … experimental technique. Letter 11586 - Darwin to Francis Darwin, 2 July 1878 …
  • … be worth making. Letter 11628 - Francis Darwin to Darwin, 24 July 1878 …
  • … floppy to work”. Letter 12152 - Francis Darwin to Darwin, 12 July 1879 …
  • … in plants. By the time this letter was written, he and Darwin were well into the publishing stage …
  • … it is important to study these later, specialised books by Darwin? What do you think these books can …

Before Origin: the ‘big book’

Summary

Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the very day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles (Darwin's Journal). He had long considered the question of species. In 1842, he outlined a theory of transmutation in a…

Matches: 26 hits

  • Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the …
  • … day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles ( Darwin's Journal ). He had long …
  • … to paper in a more substantial essay. By this point, Darwin had also admitted to his close friend …
  • … he acknowledged, ‘ like confessing a murder ’. While Darwin recognised he had far more work to do …
  • … reaction to the transmutation theory it contained convinced Darwin that further evidence for the …
  • … of Vestiges to him. It took another ten years before Darwin felt ready to start collating his …
  • … six months before he started sorting his species notes, Darwin had worried that the process would …
  • … explodes like an empty puff-ball ’, he told Hooker. Darwin’s concern may have stemmed from …
  • … immutability of species ’, he told his cousin William Darwin Fox. Experimental work …
  • … set up to provide crucial evidence for his arguments. Fox, Darwin assumed, would have bred pigeons …
  • … intensely bred to exaggerate particular characters, would, Darwin believed, clearly exhibit the …
  • … amusement’ and be a ‘ horrid bore ’. Contrary to Darwin’s expectations, however, the pigeon …
  • … Henrietta . In April 1855, at the same time as Darwin began his pigeon breeding programme, …
  • … Hoping to benefit from Hooker’s botanical expertise, Darwin inquired: ‘ will you tell me at a …
  • … land bridges suggested by the naturalist Edward Forbes. Darwin declared to Hooker in July 1856 ‘y …
  • … to me, & yet I cannot honestly admit the doctrine ’. Darwin thought Forbes’ hypothesis ‘ an …
  • … of untying it. ’ Persuading men of science Darwin’s patient untying of the knot of …
  • … about the permanence of species.— By 1857, Darwin had found the confidence to describe his …
  • … of fellow naturalists. Gray’s response was everything Darwin must have hoped for. Stating that his …
  • … definiteness of species’, Gray expressed his interest in Darwin’s work because it began with ‘ good …
  • … ’ However, it was not responses like this that led Darwin to ask that his species theory still be …
  • … had gone through ten editions and was still selling well. Darwin was worried about plagiarism and …
  • … by those alone whose opinion I value.— ‘ Darwin’s increasing confidence was built on the …
  • … Charles Lyell, who, in May 1856, twenty months after Darwin had begun sorting his species notes, …
  • … writing and publishing a ‘sketch’ of his theory ( Darwin's Journal ). Just a month …
  • … up the idea of publishing your views upon it’, he urged Darwin,’tho’ neither you nor any one else …

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 21 hits

  • … Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children,[1] began the …
  • … is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the …
  • … lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on …
  • … the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwin’s notes reveals, he closely …
  • … William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are …
  • … The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwin’s character clearly perceived by Emma during …
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6] For in these notes, Darwin’s deep scientific curiosity transcends his …
  • … that on occasion he refers to William as ‘it’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate …
  • … memories.[8] Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwin’s scientific goal, the notes here …
  • … the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had increased by five: …
  • … the onset of frowning, smiling, etc., as was the focus of Darwin’s attention on William and Anne, …
  • … of logical thought and language. On 20 May 1854, Darwin again took over the notebook and, …
  • … all the notes until July 1856, when the observations ceased. Darwin’s later entries, like Emma’s, …
  • … Transcription: 1 [9] W. Erasmus. Darwin born. Dec. 27 th . 1839.—[10] During first week. …
  • … written in pencil by CD and subsequently overwritten by Emma Darwin. The transcription throughout …
  • … [15] ‘Annie . . . fortnight’ was written by Emma Darwin on the verso of page 3 and opposite the …
  • … The name and address of a Mrs Locke are noted in Emma Darwin’s 1843 diary. [16] The following …
  • … following text to ‘Feb 27. 1840’ on page 6 is in Emma Darwin’s hand. [19] ‘After . . . weeks …
  • … of the section. [20] CD’s sister, Emily Catherine Darwin, who stayed with CD and Emma Darwin
  • … [22] The text on this page is not in the hand of CD or Emma Darwin. It was probably dictated by CD …
  • … [25] The details on this page were written by Emma Darwin. [26] This note (in pencil) by Emma …

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … Charles Darwin’s daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and …
  • … 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University …
  • … excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwin’s letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • … scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwin’s own discussion of religious belief in …
  • … of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his …
  • … emotion (see letters from F. J. Wedgwood to H. E. and C. R. Darwin, [1867–72],  letter   nos. 7058 …
  • … one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and …
  • … period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the …

Earthworms

Summary

As with many of Darwin’s research topics, his interest in worms spanned nearly his entire working life. Some of his earliest correspondence about earthworms was written and received in the 1830s, shortly after his return from his Beagle voyage, and his…

Matches: 16 hits

  • … Earthworms and Wedgwood cousins As with many of Darwin's research topics, his …
  • … months before he died in March 1882. In the same way that Darwin cast a wide net when seeking …
  • … his nieces, Lucy and Sophy Wedgwood, the daughters of Emma Darwin's brother Josiah. Darwin
  • … Scientific evidence for the history of life Darwin chose to study earthworms in order to …
  • … selection. His book Fertilisation of Orchids (1862) was Darwin's "flank movement …
  • … was a study of incredible empirical detail that demonstrates Darwin's creative experimental …
  • … (be it geology or evolutionary theory) was a subject that Darwin had contemplated from his earliest …
  • … SOURCES Papers Darwin, C.R. 1840. On the formation of mould. Transactions of the …
  • … 385 - Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood & Josiah Wedgwood to Darwin, 10 November [1837] …
  • … were fertilised. Letter 8137 - William Darwin to Charles Darwin, 1 January 1872 …
  • … of stone at Stonehenge. In his reply of two days later, Darwin wrote, “Your letter & facts are …
  • … 8144 , 8169 , and 8171 - Between Charles Darwin and Lucy Wedgwood, January 1872 …
  • … for her observations. Letter 12745 - Darwin to Sophy Wedgwood, 8 October 1880 …
  • … Letter 13406 - Mary Catherine Stanley (Lady Derby) to Darwin, 16 October 1881 Among …
  • … and its significance. Letter 13632 - Darwin to John Murray, 21 January 1882 In …
  • … magazine, Stephen Jay Gould argues for the importance of Darwin's last book and its centrality …

John Murray

Summary

Darwin's most famous book On the origin of species by means of natural selection (Origin) was published on 22 November 1859. The publisher was John Murray, who specialised in non-fiction, particularly politics, travel and science, and had published…

Matches: 18 hits

  • Darwin's most famous book  On the origin of species by means of natural …
  • … Scotland : it contains more than two hundred letters from Darwin, from his first negotiations in …
  • … date from 1859, the year of the publication of  Origin . Darwin’s son Francis described how his …
  • … more interesting correspondence ( LL  1, p. v). Darwin returned from his voyage around the …
  • …  This had been published in London by Henry Colburn, but Darwin felt that the arrangements had been …
  • … ). Lyell’s talk with Murray must have been successful, for Darwin sold his copyright in the  …
  • … a single volume. Returning to Murray the final proof sheets Darwin wrote, ‘I am much obliged for the …
  • … ). Thus began the business relationship between Charles Darwin and John Murray. Darwin’s next …
  • … Murray’s printers, and in the first copies some pages in Darwin’s chapter were transposed ( Letter …
  • … some present’ (12 June [1849] Letter 1245 ). Darwin’s next publications, his barnacle …
  • … would not have interested a commercial publisher. In 1854 Darwin had begun writing up his species …
  • … species was driven by natural selection. In order to ensure Darwin’s priority, his friends Charles …
  • … ), who, without even reading the manuscript, offered Darwin two-thirds of the profit ( Letter 2443 …
  • … the trade at 9 s .6 d . a copy ( Letter 2513a ). When Darwin first saw the finished volume, …
  • … called for ( Letter 2549 ). In the end Murray paid Darwin £180 for the first edition of  Origin …
  • … of a world that is slowly and continuously changing. Darwin now began work on  The variation …
  • … and on the good effects of intercrossing (Orchids) , which Darwin had prepared for the Linnean …
  • … ). The appearance of  Variation  was further delayed by Darwin’s ill-health and the preparation of …

Dates of composition of Darwin's manuscript on species

Summary

Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s manuscript on species (DAR 8--15.1, inclusive; transcribed and published as Natural selection). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s manuscript on species (DAR 8- …
  • … May 1856, was nearly completed by June 1858. At that point Darwin was ‘interrupted’, as he put it, …
  • … transmutation ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). Darwin recorded in his ‘Journal’ the …
  • … in the ‘Journal’ and the chapter headings as supplied by Darwin, followed by the reference of the …
  • … also given. Chapter 1 is not extant nor was it recorded in Darwin's ‘Journal’. Chapter 2 is not …
  • … chapter has been taken from a table of contents to which Darwin added the names of chapters as he …
  • … [2] This title has also been taken from Darwin's table of contents (see n. 1, above). …
  • … completed by 12 June. However, it seems more likely that Darwin worked on the revisions for both …

Casting about: Darwin on worms

Summary

Earthworms were the subject of a citizen science project to map the distribution of earthworms across Britain (BBC Today programme, 26 May 2014). The general understanding of the role earthworms play in improving soils and providing nutrients for plants to…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … for plants to flourish can be traced back to the last book Darwin wrote, snappily-titled The …
  • … on their habits, which was published in 1881. Despite Darwin’s fears that a book on earthworms might …
  • … out in his Natural History of Selborne of 1789 (a book Darwin claimed had ‘much influence on my …
  • … a new field in natural history, and almost a century later Darwin argued that all fields had passed …
  • … variety of strange things he persuaded people to do. Darwin concluded that worms had no sense …
  • … a metal whistle and to being shouted at, but also to Francis Darwin playing the bassoon, and to Emma …
  • … realising that this negative evidence was also valuable to Darwin. Thomas Henry Farrer , …
  • … existence of worms at that altitude. By the 1870s, Darwin was also drawing on the work of …
  • … him. Soon worm excrement was trusted to postal services, and Darwin acquired casts from India and …
  • … observations he had gathered to write a book on the subject. Darwin brought to the topic the …
  • … bigger souls than anyone wd suppose’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 31 January [1881] (CUL DAR 210.6: …

Darwin & Geology

Summary

The lessons Darwin learned from Adam Sedgwick at Cambridge, and in the field in North Wales, stood him in good stead during the Beagle voyage. While he was attached to the Beagle from 1831 to 1835, Darwin actually spent about two-thirds of his time ashore,…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … The lessons Darwin learned from Adam Sedgwick at Cambridge, and in the field in North …
  • … While he was attached to the Beagle from 1831 to 1835, Darwin actually spent about two-thirds of …
  • … heights of the Andes, and the coral reefs of the Pacific, Darwin’s notes on geology accumulated …
  • … and was the most substantial scientific obligation Darwin was ever to accept. In the same year he …
  • … to explain the remarkable ‘parallel roads’ of Glen Roy. Darwin’s work at Glen Roy shows that he …
  • … British Isles. This was the beginning of the end of Darwin’s career as a field geologist. In …
  • … of the Beagle voyage, but as his health worsened, Darwin no longer had the constitution or the …
  • … to modify the landscape. Earthworms was the last book Darwin published before his death in 1882. …
  • … exhaustive bibliography.) Rhodes, Frank H.T. 1991. Darwin’s search for a theory of the earth: …
  • … Science 24: 193–229. Rudwick, Martin J.S. 1974. Darwin and Glen Roy:  a ‘Great Failure’ in …
  • … Secord, James A. 1991. The discovery of a vocation:  Darwin’s early geology. British Journal for …

Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 19 hits

  • … When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect …
  • … ease of distribution sometime in late 1867 or early 1868. Darwin went over his questions, refining …
  • … was the collection of observations on a global scale. Darwin was especially interested in peoples …
  • … cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence …
  • … and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwin’s questionnaire was an extension of …
  • … was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwin’s remote observers from colouring …
  • … and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such …
  • … the collection of information to its display in print. After Darwin received all of the replies to …
  • … except “yes” or “no.” “The same state of mind” Darwin would later assert in Expression of the …
  • … uniformity.” Table of Correspondence about Darwin’s Questionnaire (click on the letter …
  • … could available online ahead of schedule as part of the “Darwin and Human Nature” project, funded by …
  • … Southampton, England letter to W.E. Darwin shrugging/pouting of …
  • … blushing Darwin, Francis 20 June 1867 …
  • … Bartlett and S. Sutton Darwin, Francis …
  • … pouting Darwin, W.E. [after 29 March 1868] …
  • … blushing in blind students Darwin, W.E. [7 …
  • … blushing Darwin, W.E. [22? April 1868] …
  • … Place, London, England letter to Emma Darwin baby expression …
  • … Conway, Wales letter to Emma Darwin infant daughter …

About Darwin

Summary

To many of us, Darwin’s name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural selection.  But even before the publication of On the Origin of Species in 1859, he was publicly known through his popular book about the voyage of the Beagle, and he was…

Matches: 16 hits

  • … To many of us, Darwin’s name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural …
  • … of his career,  Origin  was the point of departure for Darwin’s important works on variation, …
  • … of religion. Born on 12 February 1809, Charles Darwin was the son of two noteworthy families. …
  • … renowned physician, poet, and natural philosopher Erasmus Darwin.  Charles grew up in Shrewsbury …
  • … an older brother, Erasmus Alvey Darwin, and a younger sister, Catherine.  Their mother died in 1817, …
  • … cousin Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and they had ten children.  Darwin spent most of his life working from …
  • … by serving as research subjects themselves).  The depth of Darwin’s affection for his children is …
  • … the Cambridge professor of botany, John Stevens Henslow, Darwin was offered the chance to travel …
  • … to this five-year journey, which began when he was just 22, Darwin wrote, 'The voyage of the …
  • … my whole career.'  While circumnavigating the globe, Darwin remained in constant contact with …
  • … life at sea.  By the time he returned to England in 1836, Darwin had unearthed enormous mammalian …
  • … and plants that fuelled much of his later work. Darwin’s achievements during the voyage …
  • … heroes, the geologist Charles Lyell.  The six years Darwin lived in London were among the most …
  • … urged him to publish his views on evolution in 1858, when Darwin learned by letter that Alfred …
  • … specimens in the Malay Archipelago.  At home in Downe, Darwin spent the last two decades of his life …
  • … of the most renowned names in Victorian Britain.  Darwin died in April 1882; he was buried in …

Darwin’s earthquakes

Summary

Darwin experienced his first earthquake in 1834, but it was a few months later that he was really confronted with their power. Travelling north along the coast of Chile, Darwin and Robert FitzRoy, captain of HMS Beagle, were confronted with a series of…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … in only one little earthquake having happened Darwin to his sister Catherine, 8 November …
  • … with their power. Travelling north along the coast of Chile, Darwin and Robert FitzRoy, captain of …
  • … section of the west coast was shaken by an earthquake.  Darwin was in Valdivia where the damage was …
  • … wreaked in the towns and villages that made an impression; Darwin and FitzRoy also noticed the small …
  • … of the land at Concepción had risen in altitude.   Darwin, pondering a possible connection between …
  • … to conceive a grand geological theory. Travelling inland, Darwin concluded that all these separate …
  • … shock waves from a single subterranean event. Darwin had explored the Cordilleras from the …
  • … violent natural events, fossilised trees and other evidence, Darwin was attempting to visualise the …
  • … and these are amongst the most visually striking objects of Darwin’s surviving papers from the …
  • … South America and crossing back half way round the world, Darwin started to apply this theory on a …

Darwin, cats and cat shows

Summary

One of the more unusual invitations Darwin received was to be a patron of the Crystal Palace cat show, the first nationwide cat show in Britain. The man who first came up with the idea for the show, Harrison Weir, was one of Darwin’s correspondents, as…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … One of the more unusual invitations Darwin received was to be a patron of the Crystal Palace cat …
  • … up with the idea for the show, Harrison Weir, was one of Darwin’s correspondents, as were two of the …
  • … Tegetmeier and Harrison Weir were noted pigeon-fanciers and Darwin had known them since the 1850s …
  • … to study the effects of selective breeding at first hand, Darwin learned how to keep pigeons himself …
  • … Weir studied insects as well as birds, and later helped both Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. …
  • … ideas on prizes that might be offered at the second show, Darwin suggested establishing ‘ a small …
  • … apparently bizarre request is directly linked to changes Darwin made to successive editions of …
  • … or ‘correlated’, to other changes that were useful.  Darwin’s information on cats came mostly from …
  • … successive editions however, as new information came in, Darwin altered his original assertion that …
  • … . . . that this is confined to the males’ – though Darwin had his doubts about that last claim and …
  • … cats!’ It was John Weir who approached Darwin to act as one of the patrons for the fifth show …
  • … to go and admire ‘ a lot of atheistical cats! ’, Darwin lent his name alongside that of Lady …
  • … to breeding the orchids that she occasionally supplied to Darwin, also bred cats.  She had won first …

Darwin & coral reefs

Summary

The central idea of Darwin's theory of coral reef formation, as it was later formulated, was that the islands were formed by the upward growth of coral as the Pacific Ocean floor gradually subsided. It overturned previous ideas and would in itself…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … formation of barrier-reefs and atolls. Charles Darwin describing how he arrived at his …
  • … notes on geological observations that survive from the time Darwin spent on the west coast of South …
  • … which, though fragmentary and indirect, give evidence that Darwin had the main points of the theory …
  • … A letter from Robert Edward Alison, who had assisted Darwin in his observations on the elevation of …
  • … before leaving for the Galapagos early in September, Darwin jotted down some notes about coral …
  • … medium is ink, which indicates that the notes were made when Darwin was in residence ashore or on …
  • … which is concerned with subjects of primary interest to Darwin during his time in Chile: crustal …
  • … these notes on global crustal changes strongly suggests that Darwin’s theory of coral reef formation …
  • … at the time: the elevation of the South American continent. Darwin had by that time become a …
  • … of the elevation of South America. Paradoxically, Darwin’s adoption of the principle of …
  • … far too deep for reef-building corals to grow. Darwin was certainly familiar with Lyell’s …
  • … 32 coral islands, and the Frenchmen Quoy and Gaimard.  As Darwin wrote to his sister Catherine, …
  • … rapidly growing in Low islands’. From his reading Darwin must also have been aware that his …
  • … Stoddart 1962,  DAR 41: 22a.] The impact of Darwin’s first sighting of a coral island …
  • … to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands of the Indian Ocean. What Darwin saw there strengthened his …
  • … a monstrous hypothesis.’ While at Cocos (Keeling) Darwin wrote an entry in his diary that …
  • …   Shortly after returning to England, Darwin told Lyell of his theory. Lyell was immediately …
  • … (Wilson 1972, p. 449). At Lyell’s urging, Darwin read a paper on his coral theory before the …
  • … of feet.   Selected letters: Darwin tells his sister Susan that has told …
  • … 1831] . The first evidence of ideas that led to Darwin’s theory of coral reef formation: A …
  • … be a ‘monstrous hypothesis’:  29 April 1836 . Darwin exclaims that it ‘rejoices the inward …
  • … .   Suggestions for further reading on Darwin and coral reefs: Armstrong, …
  • … Stoddart, David R. 1994. This coral episode: Darwin, Dana and the coral reefs in the Pacific. In Roy …

Darwin and barnacles

Summary

In a letter to Henslow in March 1835 Darwin remarked that he had done ‘very little’ in zoology; the ‘only two novelties’ he added, almost as an afterthought, were a new mollusc and a ‘genus in the family Balanidæ’ – a barnacle – but it was an oddity. Who,…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … In a letter to Henslow in March 1835 Darwin remarked that he had done ‘very little’ in zoology; …
  • … a young Balanus in this ill-formed little monster?’ Darwin put his specimens away for over a decade, …
  • … sessile barnacles with which to compare it, and eventually, Darwin decided to write a complete …
  • … Cirrhopoda ’ embranchement (1812).   When Darwin sailed on the Beagle at the end of 1831 …
  • … of opinion among zoologists’.   How and why did Darwin become the person who would dispel …
  • … taxonomic monograph on the sub-class Cirripedia?   Darwin’s interest in marine invertebrates …
  • … that the ova of all Zoophites enjoy spontaneous motion’. Darwin was already demonstrating two …
  • … Taxonomy did not interest him for its own sake. By 1844, Darwin had produced only one small addition …
  • … discovered mostly in Chile and Brazil. In the introduction, Darwin focused on the differences …
  • … in the forests of southern Chile and Ceylon’. Although Darwin had not mentioned transmutation, the …
  • … adaptation of each species to a particular way of life. If Darwin was going to embark on a larger …
  • … true genealogical relatedness.   In his monograph, Darwin located the Cirripedia within the …

Bibliography of Darwin’s geological publications

Summary

This list includes papers read by Darwin to the Geological Society of London, his books on the geology of the Beagle voyage, and other publications on geological topics.  Author-date citations refer to entries in the Darwin Correspondence Project’s…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … This list includes papers read by Darwin to the Geological Society of London, his books on the …
  • … topics.  Author-date citations refer to entries in the Darwin Correspondence Project’s cumulative …
  • … given to reprints available in John van Wyhe ed.,  Charles Darwin’s shorter publications, 1829-1883 …
  • … numbers refer to R. B. Freeman’s standard bibliography of Darwin’s works. —Extracts from …
  • … FitzRoy RN, during the years 1832 to 1836 . By Charles Darwin. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1842. …
  • … —Remarks on the preceding paper, in a letter from Charles Darwin, Esq., to Mr. Maclaren. Edinburgh …
  • … FitzRoy RN, during the years 1832 to 1836.  By Charles Darwin. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1844. …
  • … FitzRoy RN, during the years 1832 to 1836.  By Charles Darwin. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1846. …
  • … The structure and distribution of coral reefs . By Charles Darwin. Revised edition. London: Smith, …
  • … of worms, with observations on their habits . By Charles Darwin. London. 1881.  [F1357.] …
  • … Geikie, pp. 141-2. Also,  Life and letters of Charles Darwin , edited by Francis Darwin, 3: 213-15 …
  • … exhaustive bibliography.) Rhodes, Frank H. T. 1991. Darwin’s search for a theory of the earth …
  • … Science  24: 193–229. Rudwick, Martin J. S. 1974. Darwin and Glen Roy: a ‘Great Failure’ in …
  • … Secord, James A. 1991. The discovery of a vocation: Darwin’s early geology.  British Journal for …
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