skip to content

Darwin Correspondence Project

Search: contains "darwin"

Darwin Correspondence Project
Search:
darwin in keywords disabled_by_default
3 in page disabled_by_default
0 Items

Sorry, no results...

Try modifying your search:

 
NB: Searches are not case sensitive and will find both singular and plural of any term
Examples:
floweringfind the word ‘flowering’
flowering plantfind documents containing both ‘flowering’ and ‘plant(s)’
"flowering plant"find the phrase ‘flowering plant(s)’
pl*t find any word beginning ‘pl’ followed by zero or more characters, and ending ‘t’
*plant find any word ending with ‘plant(s)’
plant* find any word beginning ‘plant’
Search:
darwin in keywords
449 Items
Page: Prev  1 2 3 4 5  ...  Next

What did Darwin believe?

Summary

What did Darwin really believe about God? the Christian revelation? the implications of his theory of evolution for religious faith? These questions were asked again and again in the years following the publication of Origin of species (1859). They are…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … What did Darwin really believe about God? the Christian revelation? the implications of …
  • … rhetoric of crusading secularists, many of whom take Darwin as an icon. But Darwin was very …
  • … Letters became an important medium through which Darwin’s readers sought to draw him out on matters …
  • … the religious implications of his work. Letters written to Darwin by persons unknown to him became …
  • … own. Mary Boole’s letter In December 1866 Darwin received a letter from Mary Boole, a …
  • … See the letter Boole, like a number of Darwin’s readers, found a way of reconciling the …
  • … with some form of religious belief. But when Boole asks Darwin about specific points of belief, such …
  • … See the letter In his response to Boole, Darwin implies that certain questions are beyond …
  • … Science, or by the so called “inner consciousness”’. Darwin does not dismiss different forms of …
  • … such territory in this letter to a stranger. Emma Darwin In what is perhaps …
  • … mind. See the letter In this letter, Darwin is quite clear that he has never …
  • … he says, is often in a state of flux. What did Darwin mean by the term “agnostic”? The word …
  • … about questions such as the existence and nature of God. For Darwin, it also seems to imply that …
  • … be answered by science, and other questions that can not. Darwin had made this point in his response …
  • … their engagement in 1838, we find an early expression of Darwin’s religious doubts. Darwin’s …
  • … with you. See the letter We know from Darwin’s scientific notebooks from this …
  • … these differences to be shared. The tendency amongst Darwin scholars has been to assume that …
  • … part, sustained their marriage. If not deeply religious, Darwin was at least not disrespectful to …
  • … and wifely devotion have appeared only as a background to Darwin’s own life and intellectual …
  • … was another important religious tradition in the Darwin and Wedgwood families. Josiah Wedgwood, who …
  • … the Darwins and Wedgwoods, together in the first place. Darwin had attended a Unitarian school in …
  • … writer Frances Power Cobbe. All were regular guests of Darwin’s brother Erasmus, and of Emma’s …
  • … only to recite the liturgy. But we know, from Francis Darwin’s comments, that Emma used to make the …
  • … Emma’s Bible also contains some annotations by Darwin. These indicate a critical reading of …
  • … approaches to the text. They also show that Darwin looked to the Bible as a guide to moral …
  • … you do not consider your opinion as formed’. As Darwin would later reveal to Fordyce and …

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence …
  • … Russel Wallace. This letter led to the first announcement of Darwin’s and Wallace’s respective …
  • … the composition and publication, in November 1859, of Darwin’s major treatise  On the origin of …
  • …  exceeded my wildest hopes By the end of 1859, Darwin’s work was being discussed in …
  • … Charles Lyell, 25 [November 1859] ). This transformation in Darwin’s personal world and the …
  • … The 'big book' The year 1858 opened with Darwin hard at work preparing his ‘big …
  • … his ninth chapter, on hybridism, on 29 December 1857, Darwin began in January 1858 to prepare the …
  • … appropriate. The correspondence shows that at any one time Darwin was engaged in a number of …
  • … The chapter on instinct posed a number of problems for Darwin. ‘I find my chapter on Instinct very …
  • … ). In addition to behaviour such as nest-building in birds, Darwin intended to discuss many other …
  • … celebrated as a classic example of divine design in nature. Darwin hypothesised that the instinct of …
  • … of construction as it took place in the hive. As with Darwin’s study of poultry and pigeons, …
  • … founder and president of the Apiarian Society, provided Darwin with information and specimens. His …
  • … For assistance with mathematical measurements and geometry, Darwin called upon William Hallowes …
  • … from the  Beagle voyage; on his brother, Erasmus Alvey Darwin; and his son William. Even his …
  • … bees and bee-hives. Variation and reversion Darwin also continued the botanical work …
  • … of smaller genera? The inquiry was of great importance to Darwin, for such evidence would support …
  • … of the statistics was still problematic. Hooker thought that Darwin was wrong to assume that …
  • … were not certain. This was a question new to the experts. Darwin was delighted to hear from Asa Gray …
  • … completed and his results written up. With some trepidation, Darwin sent his manuscript off to …
  • … in the letters of 1858 also relate to questions that Darwin had begun to explore earlier. Letters to …
  • … rush to publish With much of his research completed, Darwin began in mid-June 1858 to write …
  • … Wallace enunciated his own theory of natural selection. Darwin’s shock and dismay is evident in the …
  • … Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). As was his custom, Darwin did not supply a full date on his …
  • … as having been received ‘today’. Following Francis Darwin ( LL 2: 116–17) and relying on Charles …
  • … dated the letter 18 [June 1858]. However, the accuracy of Darwin’s words has been questioned by John …

St George Jackson Mivart

Summary

In the second half of 1874, Darwin’s peace was disturbed by an anonymous article in the Quarterly Review suggesting that his son George was opposed to the institution of marriage and in favour of ‘unrestrained licentiousness’. Darwin suspected, correctly,…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … 1874, the Catholic zoologist St George Jackson Mivart caused Darwin and his son George serious …
  • … pp. 98–114, and Dawson 2007, pp. 77–81. George Darwin's article on marriage In …
  • … liberty of marriage’ in the Contemporary Review (G. H. Darwin 1873b). In this article, George …
  • … 76). Mivart’s argument did not win general assent. Darwin was more struck by the comments on …
  • … The following quotations from Mivart’s paper mention Darwin and George: p. 45: ‘Mr. Darwin, …
  • … sentiments, disguise them by studious reticence—as Mr. Darwin disguised at first his views as to the …
  • … licentiousness theoretically justified. Mr. George Darwin proposes that divorce should be made …
  • … deep debt of gratitude will indeed be one day due to Mr. Darwin— one difficult to over-estimate. …
  • … Clearing George's name On 27 July , Darwin wrote to George: he was thinking of taking …
  • … denial & short account of [his] essay’ and have Darwin send it for publication in the next issue …
  • … long and contained an abstract of George’s paper, which Darwin pointed out was not the kind of thing …
  • … to ‘the insanity question or oppressive laws’. Darwin’s main objection to the Quarterly …
  • … ‘oppressive laws’, since they were mentioned in the text Darwin wanted to quote from the review, and …
  • … he might be thought to endorse them ( letter from G. H. Darwin, 5 August 1874 ). He sent a second …
  • … the charge of encouraging licentiousness. A postscript to Darwin’s letter, which may belong to …

Barnacles

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Darwin and barnacles Darwin’s interest in Cirripedia, a class of marine arthropods, was first piqued by the discovery of an odd burrowing barnacle, which he later named “Mr. Arthrobalanus," while he was…

Matches: 17 hits

  • … Sources | Discussion Questions | Experiment Darwin and barnacles Darwin’s …
  • … . After completing four Beagle -related publications, Darwin dissected, classified, and wrote …
  • … him as a major figure in the British zoological community. (Darwin's earlier geological …
  • … merit ). Barnacles and speciation Darwin’s work on barnacles was a key component …
  • … in its entirety, both living forms and fossilized remains, Darwin was able to see the fascinating …
  • … diversity might have developed over time. In his studies, Darwin classified the various barnacle …
  • … barnacles to crustaceans more generally. Significantly, Darwin's detailed research into a …
  • … On the Origin of Species. This body of evidence helped Darwin convince his readers of the …
  • … 1827.” In Barrett, P. ed., The collected papers of Charles Darwin. 2 vols. Chicago: University Press …
  • … anatomy of Mr. Arthrobalanus. Letter 1140 —Darwin to J. C. Ross, 31 Dec 1847 …
  • … the lost explorer John Franklin. Letter 1253 —Darwin to Albany Hancock, [21 Sept 1849] …
  • … Supplementary Reading Stott, Rebecca. 2004. Darwin and the Barnacle . New York: Farber …
  • … were to his studies? 3. From what regions does Darwin request barnacle specimens? Why was it …
  • … from so many different parts of the world? 4. How did Darwin's observations of the …
  • … on the mutability of species? Describe the significance of Darwin's barnacle work to his ideas …
  • … at Harvard: After reading about and discussing Darwin’s observations of barnacles, the class …
  • … barnacle slides, many of them from the period in which Darwin’s own barnacle collection was being …

Darwin and Fatherhood

Summary

Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten children. It is often assumed that Darwin was an exceptional Victorian father. But how extraordinary was he? The Correspondence Project allows an unusually…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten …
  • … an unusually large number of letters sent by members of the Darwin family to be studied. However, in …
  • … required them to work long hours away from their family. Darwin was unusual in being able to pursue …
  • … this part of Kent as ‘extraordinarily rural & quiet’ (Darwin to his sister Catherine,  [24 July …
  • … left their children in the care of servants in the country. Darwin frequently expressed regrets that …
  • … meetings and social events in the capital. As a result, Darwin rarely spent a day without the …
  • … ‘visits’ to see their father when he was working (Darwin to his wife Emma,  [7-8 February 1845] ). …
  • … children’s development in diaries and letters. However, Darwin was unusual for the systematic …
  • … was far more typical of mid-nineteenth-century fathers was Darwin’s intense involvement in his …
  • … to incessant anxiety & movement on account of Etty.’ (Darwin to W. D. Fox,  18 October [1860] …
  • … who did not have specialist scientific or medical interests. Darwin expressed enduring grief …
  • … terribly anxious, but fear has almost driven away grief.’ (Darwin to W. D. Fox,  2 July [1858] ). …
  • … after her birth in 1842 had a far more limited impact on Darwin. However, the intensity of grief …
  • … in a profession were a substantial drain on family finances. Darwin wrote about the ‘awesome state …

Darwin’s first love

Summary

Darwin’s long marriage to Emma Wedgwood is well documented, but was there an earlier romance in his life? How was his departure on the Beagle entangled with his first love? The answers are revealed in a series of flirtatious letters that Darwin was…

Matches: 27 hits

  • Darwin’s long marriage to Emma Wedgwood is well documented, but was there an …
  • … answers are revealed in a series of flirtatious letters that Darwin was supposed to destroy. …
  • … at my fury and revenge— Had nineteen-year-old Darwin followed this instruction in a …
  • … Fanny Mostyn Owen, wrote a series of revealing letters to Darwin, giving glimpses into their …
  • … not know whether Fanny burnt the letters she received from Darwin, but he carefully kept the letters …
  • … father, William Mostyn Owen, ‘ the Governor ’. Darwin first heard about Fanny when he was an …
  • … The high-spirited, fun-loving Fanny, two years older than Darwin, clearly established the terms of …
  • … her love of the dramatic, and most of all her inclusion of Darwin in a make-believe private world, …
  • … Forest  that shaped the relationship she developed with Darwin. The characters include Peter, a …
  • … In Fanny’s first letter, and in many others she wrote to Darwin, he was postilion to her housemaid, …
  • … words, convey a warmth of character that was first noted by Darwin’s sister Catherine. After staying …
  • … Sarah, both recently back from France, Catherine wrote to Darwin in Edinburgh. ‘I never saw such …
  • … on the social life of Brighton, she also demanded that Darwin send her ‘Shrewsbury scandal’. ‘You …
  • … black mysteries  after so long an absence ’. Darwin, however, did leave Shrewsbury before …
  • … a clergyman. Fanny’s slow response to the news of Darwin’s departure came with the excuse that she …
  • … like any thing but what  I am , a  Housemaid ’. Darwin’s feelings were probably more …
  • … he had not heard from her. Writing before the end of Darwin’s first Cambridge term, Fanny …
  • … they think, of a  Housemaid  writing to M r  Charles Darwin— ' That summer, while away …
  • …   A gift with wings At Cambridge, Darwin’s new-found passion for entomology …
  • … ’, she declared herself ‘ very much oblig’d’ for Darwin’s gift. The swallow tail ‘has absolutely  …
  • … she had not played billiards or gone riding. When Darwin did not return to Shrewsbury for …
  • … Hunters  —and  Paint brush Drivers !!! ’ Darwin was still as enraptured as ever by the Owens of …
  • … Fanny Owen, 27 January [1830] (DAR 204: 47), referring to Darwin as a Beetle Hunter and herself as …
  • … A long voyage and a secret ride In the end, it was Darwin’s ‘mania’ for natural history …
  • … and not, as she had heard, two years, but she reassured Darwin that she would remember him. …
  • … to part with you for so long ’. Little wonder that Darwin felt bereft when he learned in a …
  • … I would say poor dear Fanny till I fell to sleep', Darwin replied from Brazil, adding, ‘ I …

Getting to know Darwin's science

Summary

One of the most exciting aspects of Charles Darwin’s correspondence is the opportunity it gives to researchers to ‘get to know’ Darwin as an individual. The letters not only reveal the scientific processes behind Darwin’s publications, they give insight…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … One of the most exciting aspects of Charles Darwin’s correspondence is the opportunity it gives to …
  • … of sharing some of the knowledge gained from our work on Darwin’s correspondence with university …
  • … in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Research assistants from the Darwin Correspondence Project joined in a …
  • … the class in the following  video . Darwin Resources from Darwin
  • … set of teaching modules. Each module features a theme from Darwin’s research and life. In every …
  • … objective of the course was to introduce students both to Darwin’s most influential ideas, and to …
  • … from  On the Origin of Species  (1859) and several of Darwin’s other published works dating from …
  • … in Kent. The students analysed each topic in the context of Darwin’s correspondence, and then …
  • … that he himself undertook. Topics ranged from Darwin’s early life and education, to the …
  • … of mud, and a green thumb. In some cases, the class updated Darwin’s technological arsenal: for …
  • … smart phones) instead of rulers and pens! Integrating Darwin’s correspondence with exercises …
  • … course, reading the letters enriched their understanding of Darwin’s life and work. The letters …
  • … we were looking at to life, and gave much context to who Darwin was from childhood to old age, as a …
  • … integral part of the full comprehension of it. Knowing that Darwin was a devoted family man, …

Darwin in letters, 1860: Answering critics

Summary

On 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s Origin of species, printing off another 3000 copies to satisfy the demands of an audience that surprised both the publisher and the author. It wasn't long, however, before ‘the…

Matches: 27 hits

  • … 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s  Origin of species , printing …
  • … surprised both the publisher and the author. One week later Darwin was stunned to learn that the …
  • … But it was the opinion of scientific men that was Darwin’s main concern. He eagerly scrutinised each …
  • … his views. ‘One cannot expect fairness in a Reviewer’, Darwin commented to Hooker after reading an …
  • … ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 January [1860] ). Darwin’s magnanimous attitude soon faded, …
  • … but ‘unfair’ reviews that misrepresented his ideas, Darwin began to feel that without the early …
  • … it was his methodological criticism in the accusation that Darwin had ‘deserted the inductive track, …
  • … to J. S. Henslow, 8 May [1860] ). Above all else Darwin prided himself on having developed a …
  • … was a hypothesis, not a theory, therefore also displeased Darwin. Comparing natural selection to the …
  • … F. Bunbury, 9 February [1860] ). This helps to explain why Darwin was delighted by the defence of …
  • … issue of  Macmillan’s Magazine . Fawcett asserted that Darwin’s theory accorded well with John …
  • … induction, ratiocination, and then verification. Darwin and his critics Specific …
  • … the origin of life itself, which the theory did not address. Darwin chose to treat this as an …
  • … things, about the multitude of still living simple forms. Darwin readily admitted that his failure …
  • … it into his method of reasoning about global change. Darwin also knew that Lyell was a powerful …
  • … of the origin and distribution of blind cave animals. Darwin attempted to answer each of these …
  • … to one another. Harvey’s letters reveal aspects of Darwin’s theory that gave contemporary …
  • … discomfort. After several long letters were exchanged, Darwin finally decided that Harvey and other …
  • … whose offspring should be infertile,  inter se ,’ Darwin’s theory would remain unproven (T. H. …
  • … among animal groups could give rise to new species, Darwin found Huxley’s lecture irritating and …
  • … because more accustomed to reasoning As Darwin himself well recognised and fully …
  • … relatively advanced forms of life. Many singled out Darwin’s own discussion of the absence of …
  • … into the multitude of the earth’s present inhabitants. Darwin agreed, for example, with Alfred …
  • … ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 18 May 1860 ). Darwin began to tabulate (and categorise) his …
  • … eye to this day gives me a cold shudder Certainly Darwin was disappointed by the small …
  • … such a marvellously perfected structure as the eye. As Darwin admitted to Lyell, Gray, and others, …
  • … to Asa Gray, 3 April [1860] ). By the end of 1860, Darwin was disheartened that so few of …

Darwin and Religion

Summary

When Darwin published On the Origin of Species, was there a clear cut division between those who supported science and those who supported God? Find out how Darwin’s letters reveal a complex reaction from all sides and a desire from Darwin to keep his…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Pupils explore the reaction to Darwin’s findings as evidenced through his letters. Activities …

Science, Work and Manliness

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters In 1859, popular didactic writer William Landels published the first edition of what proved to be one of his best-selling works, How Men Are Made. "It is by work, work, work" he told his middle class audience, …

Matches: 13 hits

  • … In describing what they did using the language of labour, Darwin and his male colleagues asserted …
  • … 1. Which elements of the scientific process do Darwin and his male correspondents tend to …
  • … another's scientific work? How does this differ from how Darwin praised women's work ? …
  • … Letters Letter 282 - Darwin to Fox, W. D., [9 - 12 August 1835] Darwin
  • … thinking and hammering”. Letter 1533 - Darwin to Dana, J. D., [27 September 1853] …
  • … the labour bestowed on it are “really surprising” and Darwin hopes that Dana’s health withstood the …
  • … the subject. Letter 2669 - Bunbury, C. J. F. to Darwin, [30 January 1860] …
  • … labour and patience”. Letter 4262 - Darwin to Gray, A., [4 August 1863] Darwin
  • … which was “no slight labour”. Letter 3901 - Darwin to Falconer, H., [5 & 6 January …
  • … worked out paper on which Falconer has worked very hard. Darwin hopes that Falconer’s extreme labour …
  • … you are!”. Letter 4997 - Wallace, A. R. to Darwin, [4 February 1866] Wallace …
  • … investigation as a physical and laborious process, he envies Darwin and other “hard working …
  • … in the editorial process. Letter 9157 - Darwin to Darwin, G. H., [20 November 1873] …

Natural Science and Femininity

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters A conflation of masculine intellect and feminine thoughts, habits and feelings, male naturalists like Darwin inhabited an uncertain gendered identity. Working from the private domestic comfort of their homes and exercising…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … thoughts, habits and feelings, male naturalists like Darwin inhabited an uncertain gendered identity …
  • … feminine powers of feeling and aesthetic appreciation, Darwin and his male colleagues struggled to …
  • … Letters Letter 109 - Wedgwood, J. to Darwin, R. W., [31 August 1831] Darwin
  • … professional work on his return. Letter 158 - Darwin to Darwin, R. W., [8 & 26 …
  • … and taking in the aesthetic beauty of the world around him. Darwin describes the “striking” colour …
  • … and walks into town with Emma. Letter 555 - Darwin to FitzRoy, R., [20 February 1840] …
  • … an Infant ’. Letter 2781 - Doubleday, H. to Darwin, [3 May 1860] Doubleday …
  • … borders of his garden. Letter 2864 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [12 July 1860] …
  • … saw anything so beautiful”. Letter 4230 - Darwin to Gardeners’ Chronicle, [2 July 1863] …
  • … brought into the house immediately after a rain storm. Here, Darwin’s scientific investigation is …
  • … the “delicate siliceous shells” might at least provide Darwin with aesthetic pleasure. …
  • … his bedroom. Letter 4469 - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [20 April 1864] Hooker …
  • … life to science. Letter 4472 - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [26 or 27 April 1864] …
  • … to contribute more than this. Letter 6044 - Darwin to Darwin, G. H., [24 March 1868] …

Darwin in letters, 1861: Gaining allies

Summary

The year 1861 marked an important change in the direction of Darwin’s work. He had weathered the storm that followed the publication of Origin, and felt cautiously optimistic about the ultimate acceptance of his ideas. The letters from this year provide an…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … The year 1861 marked an important change in the direction of Darwin’s work. By then, he had …
  • … propagation, hybridism, and other phenomena that, as Darwin said in his  Autobiography , he had …
  • … provide an unusually detailed and intimate understanding of Darwin’s problem-solving method of work …
  • … 1860 that a new edition of  Origin  was called for, Darwin took the opportunity to include in the …
  • … of natural selection. With this work behind him, Darwin took steps to convince those who …
  • … ( letter to Asa Gray, 26–7 Februrary [1861] ). Darwin drew up a carefully thought-out list of …
  • … pamphlet (see Correspondence vol. 9, Appendix III). However, Darwin himself remained unconvinced by …
  • …  began to decline later in the year, scientific interest in Darwin’s views continued unabated and …
  • … the third edition and the comments of naturalists with whom Darwin corresponded, showed that a …
  • … the theory of natural selection for their particular fields. Darwin relished these explorations, …
  • … the  Zoologist  by George Maw, for example, singled out Darwin’s explanation of the numerous …
  • … remained notable instances of design in nature. Although Darwin, in his subsequent correspondence …
  • … letter to Charles Lyell, 20 July [1861] ). One reason for Darwin’s interest in this piece may have …
  • … and embryological relationships between organisms. Darwin also found the review by the young …
  • … ( see second letter to J. D. Hooker, 23 [April 1861] ). Darwin continued to stress to his …
  • … Gaining allies It is not surprising, then, that Darwin was pleased that the methodology …
  • … maintaining that nature offered more evidence of design than Darwin was willing to admit. With the …
  • … Botany, simple geology & palæontology.' Moreover, Darwin found an important …
  • … Cambridge political economist and convert to his theory, Darwin learned of Mill’s view that the …
  • … accordance with the strict principles of Logic’ and that Darwin’s methodology was ‘the only one …
  • … 1862, p. 18 n.). Later in the summer Fawcett himself made Darwin’s methodology the subject of a …
  • … for the Advancement of Science. He subsequently sent Darwin a copy of the manuscript and some …
  • … ( letter to Henry Fawcett, 18 September [1861] ). Darwin added some new names in 1861 to …
  • … geologists’, Archibald Geikie. Geikie had approved of Darwin’s chapter on the imperfection of the …
  • … Civil War. Undoubtedly, the news that most excited Darwin was word from Henry Walter Bates, …

Darwin in public and private

Summary

Extracts from Darwin's published works, in particular Descent of man, and selected letters, explore Darwin's views on the operation of sexual selection in humans, and both his publicly and privately expressed views on its practical implications…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … The following extracts and selected letters explore Darwin's views on the operation of sexual …
  • … Selected letters Letter 1113 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [2 September 1847] …
  • … of dark eyebrows. Letter 489 – Darwin to Wedgwood, E., [20 January 1859] …
  • … on his life and character. Letter 5670f - Darwin to Kingsley, C., [6 November 1867] …
  • … progenitor.    Letter 7123 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E., [March 1870] Darwin
  • … lower animals. Letter 7329 – Murray, J. to Darwin, [28 September 1870] Written …
  • … impeding general perusal. Letter 8146 – Darwin to Treat, M., [5 January 1872] …
  • … of her work on Drosera. Letter 10546 – Darwin to Editor of The Times , [23 June …
  • … progress of physiology. Letter 10746 – Darwin to Dicey, E. M., [1877] …
  • … with the sight of blood. Letter 11267f – Darwin, S. to Darwin, [3 December 1877] …
  • … from Mrs Cutting.  Letter 13607 – Darwin to Kennard, C. A., [9 January 1882] …

Darwin's notes for his physician, 1865

Summary

On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher who had studied medicine in London and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863 Chapman started to treat…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher …
  • … and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863 …
  • … Chapman wasn’t the first medical practitioner Darwin contacted around this time. In 1863, Darwin
  • … however, his health grew worse.  In his ‘Journal’, Darwin wrote that he fell ill again on 22 April …
  • … more attacks of vomiting and seeking another opinion, Darwin wrote to Chapman. On the day that …
  • … life (the section, ‘I feel nearly … food’, is in Emma Darwin’s hand). Darwin began the ice …
  • … given up the treatment (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865]). …
  • … Busk, 28 April 1865). In November and December 1863, Darwin had consulted the stomach …
  • … solutions to aid digestion ( Correspondence vol. 11, Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, 8 December [1863]) …
  • … D. Hooker, 26[-7] March [1864] ( Correspondence vol. 12), Darwin remarked that Jenner had found …
  • … Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, Darwin Evolution Collection (3314) and is …

Darwin’s study of the Cirripedia

Summary

Darwin’s work on barnacles, conducted between 1846 and 1854, has long posed problems for historians. Coming between his transmutation notebooks and the Origin of species, it has frequently been interpreted as a digression from Darwin’s species work. Yet…

Matches: 26 hits

  • Darwin’s work on barnacles, conducted between 1846 and 1854, has long posed …
  • … , it has frequently been interpreted as a digression from Darwin’s species work. Yet when this study …
  • … anomalous. Moreover, as the letters in this volume suggest, Darwin’s study of cirripedes, far from …
  • … classification using the most recent methods available, Darwin was able to provide a thorough …
  • … his views on the species question (Crisp 1983).    Darwin’s interest in invertebrate zoology …
  • … Robert Edmond Grant. In his Autobiography (pp. 49–50), Darwin recalled: ‘Drs. Grant and …
  • … numerous references to the ova of various invertebrates, and Darwin’s first scientific paper, …
  • … marine organisms was exercised during the Beagle voyage. Darwin expressed his current enthusiasm …
  • … earlier researches in Edinburgh on the ova of invertebrates, Darwin was particularly well prepared …
  • … In 1835, in the Chonos Archipelago off the coast of Chile, Darwin found ‘most curious’ minute …
  • … In the zoological notes made during the Beagle voyage, Darwin recorded: ‘The thick shell of some …
  • … the absence of a shell and its unusual parasitic nature, Darwin recognised that it differed greatly …
  • … Such a revaluation had not been undertaken when, in 1846, Darwin began to examine several …
  • … of as many genera as I could procure.’ For fourteen months Darwin pursued an anatomical study of …
  • … British Museum and himself a cirripede expert, suggested to Darwin that he prepare a monograph of …
  • … and advised him on procuring other collections. At the time Darwin committed himself to this study, …
  • … his attention for the next seven years. To appreciate why Darwin would have undertaken such a study, …
  • … and nineteenth-century naturalists (Knight 1981). Many of Darwin’s contemporaries—Edward Forbes, …
  • … (Desmond 1982; Richards 1987; Winsor 1969).    Darwin’s views on classification were tempered …
  • … in arranging groups (S. Smith 1965; Ospovat 1981, p. 108). Darwin’s frequent discussions with Owen …
  • … the common design perceived among organisms. Within Darwin’s maturing evolutionary perspective, the …
  • … 1969, p. 83).    By the early 1840s, then, Darwin’s ideas on classification were well …
  • … [26 July 1843] ( Correspondence vol. 2), for example, Darwin confidently proclaimed his …
  • … to Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire’s philosophical anatomy, Darwin incorporated the concepts of analogy and …
  • … from a similarity in their basic plan of organisation, for Darwin homology revealed actual …
  • … species from another previously existing form.    Darwin’s evolutionary interpretation of the …

Darwin and the Beagle voyage

Summary

In 1831, Darwin joined a voyage that he later referred to ‘as by far the most important event in my life’. Dive in to our 3D model of the Beagle and find out more about life on board and the adventures that he had.

Matches: 2 hits

  • … Explore the ship that took Darwin around the world on his greatest adventure  In 1831, …
  • … find out more about life on board and the adventures that Darwin had.  ►  Explore …

Darwin’s student booklist

Summary

In October 1825 Charles Darwin and his older brother, Erasmus, went to study medicine in Edinburgh, where their father, Robert Waring Darwin, had trained as a doctor in the 1780’s. Erasmus had already graduated from Cambridge and was continuing his studies…

Matches: 16 hits

  • … In October 1825 Charles Darwin and his older brother, Erasmus, went to study medicine in Edinburgh, …
  • … London for further medical training (see letter from E. A. Darwin, [29 September 1826] ). However …
  • … of England. This list is difficult to date precisely. Darwin mentions reading  Granby  in a …
  • … The position of  Granby  on the list would suggest that Darwin was very busy reading in January …
  • … of chemistry in 1801. Other books illustrate Darwin’s wider scientific interests, and also …
  • … , which was edited by David Brewster; and Robert Grant took Darwin to meetings of the Wernerian …
  • … university. There are several books of travel, and Darwin seems to have been particularly …
  • … arctic zoology. Two titles are closely connected with Darwin’s family.  Zoonomia  was …
  • … a week between March 1750 and March 1752. Both he and Dr Darwin had Lichfield connections, but the …
  • … Almack’s ,  Granby  and Brambletye House.  Darwin wrote to his sister Susan on 29 January …
  • … <Ni>tric Oxide?   (DAR 19: 3–4) Darwin’s student booklist - the text …
  • … Henry Chemistry 17  2 Vols 8 Vo Sewards memoirs of Darwin 18  1 Vol 8 Vo. Several …
  • … 3 Abernethy 1822. There is a lightly annotated copy in the Darwin Library–CUL, bound with Abernethy …
  • … 14 Bostock 1824–7. Volume 1 is in the Darwin Library–Down. 15 Jameson trans. 1827. There …
  • … 1826 as an ‘entertaining book’ (see letter to S. E. Darwin, 29 January [1826] ). The letter from …
  • … younger sons. 17 Henry 1823. Volume 2 is in the Darwin Library–CUL. 18 Seward …

Rewriting Origin - the later editions

Summary

For such an iconic work, the text of Origin was far from static. It was a living thing that Darwin continued to shape for the rest of his life, refining his ‘one long argument’ through a further five English editions.  Many of his changes were made in…

Matches: 27 hits

  • … Origin was far from static. It was a living thing that Darwin continued to shape for the rest of …
  • … hard to remember now that Origin was not the book that Darwin set out to write. He didn’t …
  • … everlasting origin, & I am sick of correcting.— Darwin found revision itself a …
  • … edition up to the 6 th (the final one published in Darwin’s lifetime) was prefaced by a long list …
  • … from Richard Owen that 'we do not want to know what Darwin believes & is convinced of, …
  • … Bordalejo, Introduction to the Online Variorum of Darwin's Origin of Species ). Not all …
  • … US editions and the French and German translations, where Darwin was often closely involved in the …
  • … . Even the term 'natural selection' came under fire , and Darwin supplemented it by …
  • … different: a cheaper, consciously ‘popular’ edition. Darwin knew that this was the last one he would …
  • … English edition: printing had begun by 22 December 1859 ; Darwin returned the last proof sheets …
  • … German translation, July 1860 3d English edition: Darwin heard that it was needed in …
  • … on first day, & he wants another instantly… Darwin heard that a new edition was …
  • … to cram in the changes that mattered to him most. Darwin’s friends were still sending …
  • … proof sheets from September to November 1859, Lyell buried Darwin under a blizzard of letters (see …
  • … finished corrections to the proofs by 11 September Darwin was still trying to incorporate Lyell’s …
  • … the origin of domestic dogs , but the change that went to Darwin’s heart was the deletion of a …
  • … list of changes he had ready to send to the publisher , Darwin highlighted the addition of an …
  • … author Charles Kingsley, a chaplain to the queen, which Darwin seized on eagerly , getting …
  • … nd to 3 rd editions; US edition By June 1860 Darwin was at least open to the …
  • … had come on the market. It incorporated many of the changes Darwin had made to the second English …
  • … advanced version of the text available.  (Read more on Darwin's additions to the US edition …
  • … in the Everglades  delights  me If Lyell was Darwin’s key correspondent for the first …
  • … plant, the paint-root, without their hooves falling off. Darwin added the account to  Origin  3d …
  • … Wyman, like so many other correspondents introduced to Darwin in this way, was applied to repeatedly …
  • … of letters with the Irish botanist William Henry Harvey.   Darwin remained unconvinced by Watson’s …
  • … to Watson’s ideas in the US edition.  More fundamentally, Darwin was frustrated that Harvey, who had …
  • … in preparation at much the same time as the US edition and Darwin built up another list of changes …

Joseph Dalton Hooker

Summary

The 1400 letters exchanged between Darwin and Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) account for around 10% of Darwin’s surviving correspondence and provide a structure within which all the other letters can be explored.  They are a connecting thread that spans…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … No single set of letters was more important to Darwin than those exchanged with his closest friend, …
  • …  They are a connecting thread that spans forty years of Darwin’s mature working life from 1843 until …
  • … an admirer of the older man, was approached about working on Darwin’s collection of plants from the  …
  • … admitted into the small and select group of those with whom Darwin felt able to discuss his emerging …
  • … a murder”. When Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) sent Darwin a letter in 1858 outlining an almost …
  • … simultaneous publication of papers by both men, and secured Darwin’s claim to the theory of …
  • … Much of the most important experimental work conducted by Darwin after the publication of  Origin …
  • … father as director in 1865, was perfectly placed to provide Darwin with exotic species, and to help …
  • … correspondents. Hooker was a frequent visitor to Darwin at his home in Downe, Kent, and …
  • … Of the many hundreds of letters that passed between Darwin and Hooker all but a handful of those …
  • … “in remembrance of his lifelong friendship with Charles Darwin”. At some time between those two …
  • … University Library, in 1948, together with the bulk of the Darwin archive, following transfer of …
  • … of their relationship with the recipient.  The use Darwin made of the information in letters …
  • … editions. And letters written in pencil suggest Darwin was unwell – you can’t use an ink dip …
  • … Going public: On 28 June 1858, just a few days after Darwin received Alfred Russel Wallace‘s …

All Darwin's letters from 1873 go online for the anniversary of Origin

Summary

To celebrate the 158th anniversary of the publication of Origin of species on 24 November, the full transcripts and footnotes of over 500 letters from and to Charles Darwin in 1873 are now available online. Read about Darwin's life in 1873 through his…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … and footnotes of over 500 letters from and to Charles Darwin in 1873 are now available online. …
  • … father or an atheist. Here are some highlights from Darwin's correspondence in 1873: …
  • … to J. D. Hooker, 23 October [1873] ) In 1873, Darwin continued work on insectivorous …
  • … , published in 1875. Investigating the sundew's sensitivity, Darwin found that the glandular …
  • … to bend inward, so that the plant closed like a fist. Darwin was fascinated by this transmission of …
  • … 2 scientific secretaries work to do  ( Letter to E. A. Darwin, 20 September 1873 ) As …
  • … proposed that he give up his medical career and become Darwin's secretary. This was a useful …
  • … appeared anonymously in the Edinburgh Review in April. Darwin asked one of his Scottish …
  • … to T. H. Huxley, 23 April 1873 ) Darwin wrote this to Thomas Henry Huxley, in the hope …
  • … poor health, and in financial trouble because of a law suit. Darwin, though not in the best of …
  • … Letter to Francis Galton, 28 May 1873 ) Darwin was invited to reflect on his own …
  • … As well as mentioning the traits listed above, Darwin revealingly declared, 'Special talents, …
Page: Prev  1 2 3 4 5  ...  Next