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Darwin Correspondence Project

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Darwin Correspondence Project
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To W. D. Fox    [7 January 1829]

Summary

Entomological news, his poor success in collecting, observation of chrysalis.

Commiserates with WDF in his dismal pre-examination state.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [7 Jan 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 8a)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-55

Matches: 5 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 8a) Charles Robert Darwin Shrewsbury [7 …
  • … Jan 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … CD’s ‘gyp’ (college servant). See Emma Darwin 2: 166. Possibly Benjamin Chapman, a fellow …
  • … AB.  as I have no doubt I soon shall. — I remain dear Fox yours sincerely | Chas. Darwin

To W. D. Fox    [25–9 January 1829]

Summary

Congratulates WDF on finishing at Cambridge; he regards his place as a very good one, and comments on how others did.

Father much pleased by gift of a swan.

Adds some entomological news.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [25–9 Jan 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 8)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-56

Matches: 6 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 8) Charles Robert Darwin Shrewsbury [25–9 …
  • … Jan 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … me | My dear Fox | Yours most sin | C.  Darwin. if you do not get the Curacy I do not know …
  • … Maurice Herbert, in a letter to Francis Darwin, stated that in his youth CD took small …
  • … Letter from J.  M.  Herbert to Francis Darwin, 12 June 1882, DAR 112: 61v. ). For a …

To W. D. Fox    [26 February 1829]

Summary

Entomological visits with F. W. Hope and J. F. Stephens in London. News of insects taken and birds shot.

Has been advised by his tutor to defer the "Little Go". Sends news of Cambridge friends.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [26 Feb 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 9)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-57

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 9) Charles Robert Darwin Cambridge [26 …
  • … Feb 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … dear old Fox | Most sincerely Yours | C.  Darwin Write soon, for I long to hear what the …

From John Coldstream    28 February 1829

Summary

News of his activities in recent months, of mutual Edinburgh acquaintances, and the Plinian Society.

JC has given up natural history for a time to prepare himself better for medical practice.

Author:  John Coldstream
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  28 Feb 1829
Classmark:  DAR 204.3
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-58

Matches: 8 hits

  • … Coldstream, John Darwin, C. R. …
  • … DAR 204.3 John Coldstream Leith 28 Feb 1829 Charles Robert Darwin
  • … 1734–42, 1: 172, pl. V. Fleming 1828 (Darwin Library–CUL). Stark 1828. No publication with …
  • … affectionate wish I remain, | My Dear Darwin, | Yours most truly | John Coldstream *S 2 …
  • … My dear Darwin I confess I was rather illpleased to receive your letter in place of …
  • … to it, see the letter to Caroline Darwin, 6 January 1826 , n.  5. William Alexander …
  • … is due to my zealous young friend Mr Charles Darwin of Shrewsbury, who kindly presented me …
  • … in different stages of maturity’ (Grant 1827; Darwin Library–CUL: ‘Philosophical tracts’). …

To W. D. Fox    [15 March 1829]

Summary

His routine days at Cambridge.

Entomology stopped for the present.

His reading, gambling, and parties. News of Cambridge friends.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [15 Mar 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 10)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-59

Matches: 5 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 10) Charles Robert Darwin Cambridge [15 …
  • … Mar 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … dear old Fox, yours most sincerely | C.  Darwin Recollect: that Deo Volente whether your …
  • … In an anecdote about his father, George Darwin says: ‘Amongst his Cambridge expeditions I …

To W. D. Fox    1 April [1829]

Summary

Eager to hear how WDF and his family get on.

Entomology goes poorly. Harbour has given C. C. Babington first pick of the beetles, and CD has stopped buying from him.

Fire at Linton.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  1 Apr [1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 11)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-60

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 11) Charles Robert Darwin Cambridge 1 …
  • … Apr [1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … ever met with, you are y e greatest & the best | C Darwin. — 1 o’clock—going on very well …

To W. D. Fox    [10 April 1829]

Summary

Has been in "a perfect and absolute state of idleness", riding and walking in the morning, gambling at Van John [vingt-et-un] in the evening.

"Little Go" has been unusually strict.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [10 Apr 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 12)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-61

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 12) Charles Robert Darwin Cambridge [10 …
  • … Apr 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … I most sincerely hope she will soon be recovered Yours most affectionately | C.  Darwin

To W. D. Fox    [12 April 1829]

Summary

CD writes with much sympathy for WDF, whose sister [Mrs Bristowe] is alarmingly ill.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [12 Apr 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 13)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-62

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 13) Charles Robert Darwin Cambridge [12 …
  • … Apr 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … Believe me my dear Fox | Yours most affectionately | Charles Darwin *S 2 Cambridge …

To W. D. Fox    [23 April 1829]

Summary

CD’s sister Catherine has informed him of the death of WDF’s sister [Mrs Bristowe]. CD sends sympathy to WDF and his parents, and refers to the pure and holy comfort afforded by the Bible.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [23 Apr 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 14)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-63

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 14) Charles Robert Darwin Cambridge [23 …
  • … Apr 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … then believe me, at all times | Yours most affectionately | Charles Darwin *S 2 Cambridge …

To W. D. Fox    [18 May 1829]

Summary

Is getting the information WDF wanted about his bills;

adds some news of entomology.

Accepts invitation to visit Osmaston in August. Plans a June trip to Shrewsbury, a three-week trip in Wales with F. W. Hope.

Is doing nothing but riding and entomology.

Thinks WDF wise to defer going into orders.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [18 May 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 15)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-64

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 15) Charles Robert Darwin Cambridge [18 …
  • … May 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … going on pretty well: | Believe me my dear Fox | Yours most sincerely | Chas. Darwin. — …

From Francis Knyvett Leighton    [3 June 1829]

Summary

Invites CD for the boatrace and the cricket matches, and to see Oxford. Suggests Cambridge will win, but he will bet up to £5 on Oxford at 3 to 1.

Author:  Francis Knyvett Leighton
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [3 June 1829]
Classmark:  DAR 204.3
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-65

Matches: 2 hits

  • … Leighton, F. K. (b) Darwin, C. R. …
  • … 204.3 Francis Knyvett Leighton Magdalen College Oxford [3 June 1829] Charles Robert Darwin

To W. D. Fox    7 June [1829]

Summary

Has shipped a portmanteau and box of WDF’s things. Lists bills paid from funds sent.

"My success has been very splendid in the science" [entomology].

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  7 June [1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 16)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-66

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 16) Charles Robert Darwin Cambridge 7 …
  • … June [1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … when you next see my insects. I will write soon again. Yours affectionately | Chas. Darwin

To W. D. Fox    [3 July 1829]

Summary

CD started on an entomology trip through N. Wales with F. W. Hope, but after two days his lips became bad, and he was unwell; had to return home. Took some good insects in the two days, but Hope "did wonders". CD is determined to retrace Hope’s tour before autumn.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [3 July 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 17)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-67

Matches: 5 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 17) Charles Robert Darwin Shrewsbury [3 …
  • … July 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … are preserved in one bound volume at Darwin Library–CUL.  CD’s annotations are not …
  • … My dear Fox, Yours most sincerely, | Chas. Darwin I hope the boxes have arrived safe: keep …

To W. D. Fox    [15 July 1829]

Summary

Tells whereabouts of WDF’s remaining Cambridge possessions;

adds he has many insects for him. Can WDF join him for a week in Wales?

CD must read for his "Little Go" as the examination is being made more difficult.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [15 July 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 18)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-68

Matches: 6 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 18) Charles Robert Darwin Shrewsbury [15 …
  • … July 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … You will find them very useful in many points of view. Dear old Fox, yours | C.  Darwin
  • … 200) ‘ Graphiphora plecta “Cambridge”. — C.  Darwin, Esq. ’ The number dated 15 June 1829  …
  • … the magic words, “captured by C.  Darwin, Esq. ”, his memory is of beetle collecting. …

To W. D. Fox    29 [July 1829]

Summary

Sends stuffed birds;

attempts to arrange a meeting.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  29 [July 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 19)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-69

Matches: 6 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Edward Darwin of Mackworth, Derbyshire. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 19) Charles Robert Darwin Shrewsbury 29 [ …
  • … July 1829] William Darwin Fox ‘C. …
  • Darwin July 29, 1829’ …
  • … sorry that it is impossible. Believe me dear Fox | Yours most sincerely | Chas. Darwin

To W. D. Fox    26 [August 1829]

Summary

If convenient, CD will visit WDF at Osmaston early in September. Went to Barmouth with his sisters.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  26 [Aug 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 20)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-70

Matches: 6 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 20) Charles Robert Darwin Shrewsbury 26 [ …
  • … Aug 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … The John Wedgwoods (see Emma Darwin 1: 215). Jessie Sismondi, wife of the historian, Jean …
  • … me my dear Fox, Yours sincerely | Chas. Darwin My Father sends his best regard to you. — …
  • … My Father is glad to hear that M rs . Darwin is tolerably well: it must have been a …

To W. D. Fox    4 September [1829]

Summary

Must shorten his visit to Osmaston in order to see Erasmus Darwin, who has just come home.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  4 Sept [1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 21)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-71

Matches: 5 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 21) Charles Robert Darwin Maer 4 …
  • … Sept [1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … Must shorten his visit to Osmaston in order to see Erasmus Darwin, who has just come home. …
  • … been out two days & have only killed 3 birds a day. — Yours affectionately | Chas. Darwin

To W. D. Fox    [22 September 1829]

Summary

Erasmus has changed his plans, intends to give up doctoring for the present, and will live in London.

CD will go to the Birmingham Music Meeting.

He hopes WDF has been finding insects; J. F. Turner has.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [22 Sept 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 22)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-72

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 22) Charles Robert Darwin Shrewsbury [22 …
  • … Sept 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … Believe me dear Fox | Yours most sincerely, | Charles Darwin Write to me directly. …

To W. D. Fox    [15 October 1829]

Summary

The Music Meeting was "glorious"; Malibran outshone all others.

Missed Hope in London.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [15 Oct 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 23)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-73

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 23) Charles Robert Darwin Christ’s College, Cambridge [ …
  • … 15 Oct 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … it will be so very snug being together once more. — Yours most sincerely | Charles Darwin

To W. D. Fox   [3 November 1829]

Summary

CD’s father has been very ill, but is now slowly improving.

Writes of Leonard Jenyns’ cabinet and J. S. Henslow’s parties.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  [3 Nov 1829]
Classmark:  Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 24)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-74

Matches: 4 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. Fox, W. D. …
  • … Christ’s College Library, Cambridge (Fox 24) Charles Robert Darwin Cambridge [3 …
  • … Nov 1829] William Darwin Fox …
  • … return early in the next Term to read for my little Go. Yours very sincerely | C.  Darwin
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Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 25 hits

  • … Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig …
  • … as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified …
  • … correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring …
  • … Actor 1 – Asa Gray Actor 2 – Charles Darwin Actor 3 – In the dress of a modern day …
  • … Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwin… and acts as a sort …
  • … the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and …
  • … this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa …
  • … friends in England, copies of his ‘Review of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it …
  • … Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwin… made his home on the border of the little …
  • … are kept in check by a constitutional weakness. DARWIN: A plain but comfortable brick …
  • … by every blessing except that of vigorous health… DARWIN:  4   My confounded stomach …
  • … pursuits and the simplicity of his character. DARWIN:   5   I am allowed to work now …
  • … own house, where he was the most charming of hosts. DARWIN:   6   My life goes on …
  • … being a part of [an unpublished] manuscript. Darwin settles down to write. His tone is …
  • … THE CONCURRENCE OF BOTANISTS: 1855 In which Darwin initiates a long-running correspondence …
  • … gossip about difficult colleagues (Agassiz). Gray realizes Darwin is not revealing all of his …
  • … man, more formally attired and lighter on his feet than Darwin. He has many more demands on his time …
  • … catches his attention. He opens the letter. DARWIN:  8   April 25 th 1855. My …
  • … filled up the paper you sent me as well as I could. DARWIN:  10   My dear Dr Gray. I …
  • … is condensed in that little sheet of note-paper! DARWIN:  11   My dear Hooker… What …
  • … surprising good. GRAY:   12   My dear Mr Darwin, I rejoice in furnishing facts to …
  • … of the sort to the advancement of science… DARWIN:  13   I hope… before [the] end of …
  • … reasonably expect… Yours most sincerely Asa Gray. DARWIN:  16   My dear Gray… Your …
  • … Journal, as a nut for [Professor] Agassiz to crack. Darwin and Gray share a joke at the …
  • … will turn up that he cannot explain away… DARWIN:  22   Hurrah I got yesterday my …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a …
  • … community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women …
  • … Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • … peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October …
  • … garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwin’s …
  • … . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] Mary Barber …
  • … Letter 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] …
  • … Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] Anne Jane Cupples, …
  • … observations on the expression of emotion in dogs with Emma Darwin. Letter 8676 - …
  • … and offers to observe birds, insects or plants on Darwin’s behalf. Letter 8683 - …
  • … ears. Letter 8701 - Lubbock, E. F . to Darwin, [1873] Ellen Lubbock, …

Language: key letters

Summary

How and why language evolved bears on larger questions about the evolution of the human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the development of human speech from animal sounds in The Descent of Man (1871),…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the …
  • … he first began to reflect on the transmutation of species. Darwin’s correspondence reveals the scope …
  • … he exchanged information and ideas. Letter 346: Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, C. S., 27 Feb 1837 …
  • … one stock.” Letter 2070: Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [before 29 Sept 1857] …
  • … down of former continents.” Letter 3054: Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 2 Feb [1861] …
  • … that languages, like species, were separately created. Darwin writes to the geologist Charles Lyell …
  • … I tell him is perfectly logical.” Letter 5605: Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J. F. T., 15 Aug …
  • … loud noise?” Letter 7040: Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [1868-70?] As …
  • … gradually growing to such a stage” Letter 8367: Darwin, C. R. to Wright, Chauncey, 3 June …
  • … unconsciously altering the breed. Letter 8962: Darwin, C. R. to Max Müller, Friedrich, 3 …
  • … Letter 10194: Max Müller, Friedrich to Darwin, C. R., 13 Oct [1875] For Müller, human and …
  • … Language […]” Letter 9887: Dawkins, W. B. to Darwin, C. R., 14 Mar 1875 The …
  • … of race […]” Letter 11074: Sayce, A. H. to Darwin, C. R., 27 July 1877 Darwin’s …
  • … and comparative philologist Archibald Sayce wrote to Darwin with a series of detailed questions …
  • … how a child first uttered the word ‘mum’. In his reply, Darwin told Sayce “that ‘mum’ arose from …

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those …
  • … a broad variety of women had access to, and engaged with, Darwin's published works. A set of …
  • … women a target audience? Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • … that his views are original and will appeal to the public. Darwin asks Murray to forward the …
  • … and criticisms of style. Letter 2461 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] …
  • … it had been proofread and edited by “a lady”. Darwin, E. to Darwin, W. E. , (March 1862 …
  • … typically-male readers. Letter 7124 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E., [8 February 1870] …
  • … and style. Letter 7329 - Murray , J. to Darwin, [28 September 1870] …
  • … impeding general perusal. Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, J., [29 September …
  • … content. Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [16 May 1872] Reade …
  • … of women. Letter 8341 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [20 May 1872] Reade …
  • … women. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November 1872] …
  • … Cupples got hold of it first. Darwin’s female readership …

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … activities for building and maintaining such connections. Darwin's networks extended from his …
  • … when strong institutional structures were largely absent. Darwin had a small circle of scientific …
  • … section contains two sets of letters. The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. …
  • … about Hooker’s thoughts. Letter 729 — Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., [11 Jan 1844] …
  • … is like confessing a murder”. Letter 736 — Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 23 Feb [1844 …
  • … of wide-ranging species to wide-ranging genera. Darwin and Gray Letter 1674 …
  • … of the species. Letter 1685 — Gray, Asa to Darwin, C. R., 22 May 1855 Gray …
  • … of alpine flora in the USA. Letter 2125 — Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 20 July [1857] …
  • … have in simple truth been of the utmost value to me.” Darwin believes species have arisen, like …
  • … or continuous area; they are actual lineal descendants. Darwin discusses fertilisation in the bud …
  • … exchange This collection of letters between Darwin and Hooker, while Darwin was writing his …
  • … to information exchange. Letter 1202 — Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] …
  • … followed automatically. On the issue of nomenclature reform, Darwin opposes appending first …

Darwin’s Photographic Portraits

Summary

Darwin was a photography enthusiast. This is evident not only in his use of photography for the study of Expression and Emotions in Man and Animal, but can be witnessed in his many photographic portraits and in the extensive portrait correspondence that…

Matches: 14 hits

  • Darwin was a photography enthusiast. This is evident not only in his use of …
  • … portraits and in the extensive portrait correspondence that Darwin undertook throughout his lifetime …
  • … was jokingly lamenting his role as an intermediary for Darwin and his correspondents from around the …
  • … of friends and relatives was not a pursuit unique to Darwin (the exchange of photographic images was …
  • … reinforced his experimental and scientific network. Darwin’s Portraits Darwin sat for …
  • … famous photographers to studio portraitists looking to sell Darwin’s image to the masses. Between …
  • … in nineteenth-century photography. Darwin’s first photo-chemical experience …
  • … This particular daguerreotype is unique in terms of Darwin’s collection of photographs – it is the …
  • … exchanged, but rather was an object of display placed on a Darwin family mantlepiece. The image …
  • … in London and made at least four different exposures of Darwin between 1853 and 1857. They …
  • … While this image is notable as the first popular image of Darwin, the extent to which Darwin
  • … me look atrociously wicked.” Image: Charles Darwin, by Maull & Polyblank, albumen …
  • … Portrait Gallery, London (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0) Darwin’s next experience with the …
  • … with the results. In 1860-61 and again in 1864 Charles Darwin sat for his eldest son, William Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1876 on this website.  The full texts …
  • … 24 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge …
  • … The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the …
  • … games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wife … poor creature, has won …
  • … regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to …
  • … four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11 …
  • … once, the labour of checking proofs proved a blessing, as Darwin sought solace for the loss of his …
  • … and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and …
  • … had involved much time and effort the previous year, and Darwin clearly wanted to focus his …
  • … When Smith, Elder and Company proposed reissuing two of Darwin’s three volumes of the geology of …
  • … single-volume edition titled Geological observations , Darwin resisted making any revisions at …
  • … volume, Coral reefs , already in its second edition. Darwin was nevertheless ‘firmly resolved not …
  • … meticulous correction of errors in the German editions made Darwin less anxious about correcting the …
  • … to Carus. ( Letter to J. V. Carus, 24 April 1876. ) Darwin focused instead on the second …
  • … concentrated on the ‘means of crossing’, was seen by Darwin as the companion to Cross and self …
  • … return to old work than part of the future work outlined by Darwin in his ‘little Autobiography’ ( …
  • … holiday after finishing Cross and self fertilisation , Darwin took up the suggestion made by a …
  • … for his family only. Writing for an hour every afternoon, Darwin finished his account on 3 August …
  • … dimittis.”’ (‘Recollections’, pp. 418–19). Darwin remained firm in his resolution to …
  • … ever return to the consideration of man.’ In particular, Darwin seemed eager to avoid issues that …
  • … wrote with the good news that he could restore Darwin to a religious life. This transformation would …
  • … that used to be called transmigration, Nemo pointed out to Darwin, adding, ‘the term nowadays is …
  • … enemies... Views such as these were easy enough for Darwin to dismiss, but it was more …

Religion

Summary

Design|Personal Belief|Beauty|The Church Perhaps the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same can be said of the evolution controversy today; however the nature of the disputes and the manner in…

Matches: 16 hits

  • … the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same …
  • … nineteenth century were different in important ways. Many of Darwin's leading supporters were …
  • … their religious beliefs with evolutionary theory. Darwin's own writing, both in print and …
  • … much as possible. A number of correspondents tried to draw Darwin out on his own religious views, …
  • … political contexts. Design Darwin was not the first to challenge …
  • … on the controversial topic of design. The first is between Darwin and Harvard botanist Asa Gray, …
  • … second is a single letter from naturalist A. R. Wallace to Darwin on design and natural selection. …
  • … result of “brute force”. Letter 2855 — Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 3 July [1860] …
  • … a “muddle” on this issue. Letter 3256 — Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 17 Sept [1861] …
  • … experiment about an angel. Letter 3342 — Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 11 Dec [1861] …
  • … some questions about design. Letter 6167 — Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 8 May [1868] …
  • … of each fragment at the base of my precipice”. Darwin and Wallace Letter 5140 …
  • … of natural selection. He worries about the accusation in Darwin & his teachings “ Natural …
  • … fittest” instead of “Natural Selection”. Wallace urges Darwin to stress frequency of variations. …
  • … Personal Belief This collection of letters explores Darwin’s reluctance to take a definitive …
  • … own family. Letter 441 — Wedgwood, Emma to Darwin, C. R., [21–22 Nov 1838] In this …

Language: Interview with Gregory Radick

Summary

Darwin made a famous comment about parallels between changes in language and species change. Gregory Radick, Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at Leeds University, talks about the importance of the development of language to Darwin, what…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … the interview.     1. According to Darwin, how did language begin? …
  • … a bit more about that? 4. How did you use Darwin’s correspondence to re-evaluate …
  • … is the power of language. And the most important element in Darwin’s account of the origin of …
  • … the world or standing for feelings, begin to accumulate, and Darwin says these signs gave advantages …
  • … predators that might attack them, whatever it might be, Darwin thinks had an advantage in the …
  • … So language begins to accumulate like that. Likewise, Darwin thinks, in the courtship competition …
  • … better functioning brains. And a very important part of Darwin’s account of the origin of language …
  • … become more intelligent. And with larger intelligence comes, Darwin thinks, so many things—the …
  • … and so forth. 2. Was this an important topic for Darwin? And if so, why? It was hugely …
  • … systems of nonhuman animals, and human language.  And so Darwin saw himself as trying to combat that …
  • … Darwinian account of the origin of language. 3. Darwin made a famous comment about parallels …
  • … that? Well, there’s a famous passage at the end of Darwin’s discussion of the evolutionary …
  • … ten of these. And a question has arisen, quite what was Darwin getting up to in pointing out these …
  • … debate, and on the one side are people who say that Darwin couldn’t resist an opportunity to review …
  • … but I also think something more is going on there. Darwin was very concerned to defend his position …
  • … the languages still show the formerly high state. So Darwin’s concerned, in my view, to …
  • … people who like to think of themselves as fans of Charles Darwin because, of course, we don’t …
  • … that, equality of languages. But that wasn’t the case for Darwin, that wasn’t how he understood his …
  • … him and us, however uncomfortable. 4. How did you use Darwin’s correspondence to re-evaluate …
  • … topics, I learned that there was a story around about how Darwin, very late in life, had changed his …
  • … of study of all this, and it turns out that from the time of Darwin’s death through till now, …
  • … not quite at the deathbed, but in 1881, a letter in which Darwin wrote to a friend of his that he …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 24 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from 1874 on this website.  The full texts of the …
  • … 22 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge …
  • … dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwin’s son George dominated the second …
  • … and traveller Alexander von Humboldt’s 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt …
  • … ). The death of a Cambridge friend, Albert Way, caused Darwin’s cousin, William Darwin Fox, to …
  • … from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one …
  • … I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a week’s visit to …
  • … Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that …
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in …
  • … 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and sceptics Darwin excused himself for reasons of …
  • … by George Henry Lewes and Marian Evans (George Eliot), but Darwin excused himself, finding it too …
  • … the month, another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwin’s cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those …
  • … imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin agreed that it was ‘all imposture’ …
  • … stop word getting to America of the ‘strange news’ that Darwin had allowed ‘a spirit séance’ at his …
  • … the first three months of the year and, like many of Darwin’s enterprises in the 1870s, were family …
  • … 21, letter to Smith, Elder & Co., 17 December [1873] ). Darwin himself had some trouble in …
  • … and letter to Charles Lyell, [13 January 1874] ). Darwin blamed his illness for the …
  • … . In his preface ( Coral reefs  2d ed., pp. v–vii), Darwin reasserted the priority of his work. …
  • … for the absence of coral-reefs in certain locations. Darwin countered with the facts that low …
  • … whole coastline of a large island. Dana also thought that Darwin had seen fringing reefs as proof of …
  • … presentation copy, Dana sent an apology for misinterpreting Darwin on this point ( letter from J. D …
  • … Alongside his revision of  Coral reefs,  Darwin went to work on a new edition of  Descent . In …
  • … George Cupples, a Scottish deerhound expert who forwarded Darwin’s queries about the numbers of …
  • … had raged between himself and Richard Owen since the 1860s. Darwin had omitted this controversial …

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’ Darwin confessed in January1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months. January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from 1875 on this website.  The full texts of the …
  • … 23 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge …
  • … Editions Plants always held an important place in Darwin’s theorising about species, and …
  • … his periods of severe illness. Yet on 15 January 1875 , Darwin confessed to his close friend …
  • … way to continuous writing and revision, activities that Darwin found less gratifying: ‘I am slaving …
  • … bad.’ The process was compounded by the fact that Darwin was also revising another manuscript …
  • … coloured stamens.’ At intervals during the year, Darwin was diverted from the onerous task of …
  • … zoologist St George Jackson Mivart. In April and early May, Darwin was occupied with a heated …
  • … chapter of the controversy involved a slanderous attack upon Darwin’s son George, in an anonymous …
  • … on 12 January , breaking off all future communication. Darwin had been supported during the affair …
  • … Society of London, and a secretary of the Linnean Society, Darwin’s friends had to find ways of …
  • … pp. 16–17). ‘How grandly you have defended me’, Darwin wrote on 6 January , ‘You have also …
  • … in public. ‘Without cutting him direct’, he advised Darwin on 7 January , ‘I should avoid him, …
  • … & again’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 January 1875 ). Darwin had also considered taking up …
  • … , ‘I feel now like a pure forgiving Christian!’ Darwin’s ire was not fully spent, however, …
  • … in the same Quarterly article that attacked George. Darwin raised the matter at the end of the …
  • … to rest, another controversy was brewing. In December 1874, Darwin had been asked to sign a memorial …
  • … Hensleigh and Frances Wedgwood. She had corresponded with Darwin about the evolution of the moral …
  • … could not sign the paper sent me by Miss Cobbe.’ Darwin found Cobbe’s memorial inflammatory …
  • … memorial had been read in the House of Lords (see ' Darwin and vivisection ').   …
  • … medical educators, and other interested parties. Darwin was summoned to testify on 3 November. It …
  • … ( Report of the Royal Commission on vivisection , p. 183). Darwin learned of Klein’s testimony …
  • … agree to any law, which should send him to the treadmill.’ Darwin had become acquainted with Klein …
  • … am astounded & disgusted at what you say about Klein,’ Darwin replied to Huxley on 1 November …
  • … the man.’   Poisons, plants, and print-runs Darwin’s keen interest in the progress of …
  • … leading physiologists. Indeed, some of the experiments that Darwin performed on plants, such as the …

Controversy

Summary

Disagreement & Respect|Conduct of Debate|Darwin & Wallace The best-known controversies over Darwinian theory took place in public or in printed reviews. Many of these were highly polemical, presenting an over-simplified picture of the disputes.…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … Disagreement & Respect | Conduct of Debate | Darwin & Wallace The best-known …
  • … the disputes. Letters, however, show that the responses to Darwin were extremely variable. Many of …
  • … was itself an important arena of debate, one that Darwin greatly preferred to the public sphere. …
  • … and support sustained in spite of enduring differences. Darwin's correspondence can thus help …
  • … Disagreement and Respect Darwin rarely engaged with critics publically. Letters exchanged …
  • … Richard Owen, the eminent comparative anatomist, show how Darwin tried to manage strong disagreement …
  • … were less severe, the relationship quickly deteriorated and Darwin came to regard him as a bitter …
  • … of respect. Letter 2548 — Sedgwick, Adam to Darwin, C. R., 24 Nov 1859 Adam …
  • … which can neither be proved nor disproved”. He says that Darwin’s “grand principle natural …
  • … and as his true-hearted friend. Letter 2555 — Darwin, C. R. to Sedgwick, Adam, 26 Nov …
  • … have influenced the conclusions at which he has arrived. Darwin does not think the book will be …
  • … and incoming of living species” and so could not regard Darwin’s attempt to demonstrate the nature …
  • … at length a conversation with Owen concerning Origin . Darwin notes “that at bottom he goes …
  • … he thinks a sort of Bear was the grandpapa of Whales!” Darwin has heard Herschel considered his book …

Evolution: Selected Letters of Charles Darwin 1860-1870

Summary

This selection of Charles Darwin’s letters includes correspondence with his friends and scientific colleagues around the world; letters by the critics who tried to stamp out his ideas, and by admirers who helped them to spread. It takes up the story of…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … This selection of Charles Darwin’s letters includes correspondence with his friends and scientific …
  • … admirers who helped them to spread. It takes up the story of Darwin’s life in 1860, in the immediate …
  • … of publication of Descent of Man in 1871. In this period Darwin became a public figure, and the …
  • … increased accordingly. Letters conveyed public reaction to Darwin, as people who were often complete …
  • … worked up, or their religious doubts and concerns for Darwin’s own soul. Darwin himself used letters …
  • … world a questionnaire on the expression of the emotions. Darwin also continued to confide in his …
  • … yet been pointed out to me. No doubt many will be. Darwin to Huxley, 1860. …
  • … have been miserably uncomfortable. Emma to Charles Darwin, 1861. I am …
  • … gravitating towards your doctrines … Huxley to Darwin, 1862. I cannot bear …
  • … what you think about the derivation of Species … Darwin to Charles Lyell, 1863. …
  • … fairly settled & succeeding in India. John Scott to Darwin, 1864. I …
  • … was quite out of balance once during our voyage … Darwin to Hooker (on hearing of Robert …
  • … that the necks of your horses are badly galled … Darwin to a local landowner, 1866. …
  • … should be still very far off. Mary Boole to Darwin, 1866. Never, for God’s …

Darwin in letters, 1877: Flowers and honours

Summary

Ever since the publication of Expression, Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The year 1877 was no exception. The spring and early summer were spent completing Forms of flowers, his fifth book on a botanical topic. He then turned to the…

Matches: 29 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1877 on this website.  The full texts …
  • … 25 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge …
  • … Ever since the publication of Expression , Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The …
  • … of these projects would culminate in a major publication. Darwin’s botany was increasingly a …
  • … assisted his father’s research on movement and bloom, and Darwin in turn encouraged his son’s own …
  • … The year 1877 was more than usually full of honours. Darwin received two elaborate photograph albums …
  • … from Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands. Closer to home, Darwin received an honorary Doctorate of …
  • … sites for possible earthworm activity. Now in his 69th year, Darwin remained remarkably productive, …
  • … no controversy. In his autobiographical reflections, Darwin remarked: ‘no little discovery of …
  • … (‘Recollections’, p. 419). During the winter and spring, Darwin was busy preparing the manuscript of …
  • … and presented to the Linnean Society of London. In the book, Darwin adopted the more recent term …
  • … as dimorphic without comparing pollen-grains & stigmas’, Darwin remarked to Joseph Dalton …
  • … measurements of the size and number of pollen-grains, Darwin compared the fertility of individual …
  • … primrose and purple loosestrife. In the course of his work, Darwin found a number of other …
  • … dreadful work making out anything about dried flowers’, Darwin complained to Asa Gray on 8 March …
  • … which include heterstyled species. This pleases me.’. Darwin dedicated the book to Gray, ‘as a small …
  • … separate publications together into a larger whole enabled Darwin to advance more speculative views …
  • … both pollen and seeds’ ( Forms of flowers , p. 344). Darwin was typically pessimistic about the …
  • … be sold’. His publisher knew from previous experience that Darwin was a poor judge of sales, and …
  • … after completing his manuscript of Forms of flowers , Darwin took up the problem of ‘bloom’ in …
  • … characteristic whose purpose was little understood. Darwin had begun studying bloom in August 1873, …
  • … exchanged between Down and Kew over the next six months. Darwin corresponded most often with the …
  • … been for your kindness, we sh d . have broken down’, Darwin wrote back on 5 September . ‘As it …
  • … injury from pure water resting on leaves’. In the end, Darwin did not publish on the subject, but …
  • … on leaves and the distribution of the stomata’ (F. Darwin 1886). Alongside his work on bloom, …
  • … closely to the leaves and required a tolerable shake’. Darwin gained another valuable observer in …
  • … T. Thiselton-Dyer, 25 August 1877 ). At Down House, Darwin and Francis devised a method of …
  • … the phenomenon in a Euphorbia (spurge) plant at Kew. Darwin then asked him to disturb the plant …
  • … card, and bits of glass. Encouraging Francis Darwin greatly enjoyed working with …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now …
  • … and also a meeting with Herbert Spencer, who was visiting Darwin’s neighbour, Sir John Lubbock. In …
  • … all but the concluding chapter of the work was submitted by Darwin to his publisher in December. …
  • … hypothesis of hereditary transmission. Debate about Darwin’s theory of transmutation …
  • … alleged evidence of a global ice age, while Asa Gray pressed Darwin’s American publisher for a …
  • … for the Advancement of Science. Fuller consideration of Darwin’s work was given by Hooker in an …
  • … frustrations were punctuated by family bereavement. Two of Darwin’s sisters died, Emily Catherine …
  • … from painful illness. Diet and exercise Among Darwin’s first letters in the new year …
  • … every day’ ( letter to H. B. Jones, 3 January [1866] ). Darwin had first consulted Jones in July …
  • … ( letter from H. B. Jones, 10 February [1866] ). Darwin began riding the cob, Tommy, on 4 …
  • … day which I enjoy much.’ The new exercise regime led to Darwin’s being teased by his neighbour, John …
  • … John Lubbock, 4 August 1866 ). More predictably, however, Darwin immediately converted his renewed …
  • … Since the publication of  Origin  in November 1859, Darwin had continued gathering and organising …
  • … by natural selection was based. The work relied heavily on Darwin’s extensive correspondence over …
  • … and poultry expert William Bernhard Tegetmeier. In January, Darwin wrote to Tegetmeier that he was …
  • … ( letter to W. B. Tegetmeier, 16 January [1866] ). Darwin found the evidence of variation in …
  • … varieties from  Columbia livia , the rock pigeon. Darwin on heredity: the 'provisional …
  • … chapter headed ‘Provisional hypothesis of pangenesis’, Darwin proposed that the various phenomena of …
  • … example, the reproductive organs, or the tissues of a bud. Darwin had submitted a preliminary sketch …
  • … & brimful of my dear little mysterious gemmules.’ Darwin collected information on …
  • … Thomas Rivers, and the German botanist Robert Caspary. Darwin was particularly interested in recent …
  • … the scion apparently produced buds with blended characters; Darwin had tried to propagate the …

Early Days

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment The young Charles Darwin From an early age, Darwin exhibited a keen interest in the natural world. His boyish fascination with naturalist pursuits deepened as he entered college and started to interact with…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … Questions | Experiment The young Charles Darwin From an early age, Darwin
  • … started to interact with fellow natural history enthusiasts. Darwin's correspondence from this …
  • … Under the mentorship of Robert Grant at Edinburgh, Darwin undertook original research about the …
  • … of bryazoan. In correspondence from his student days, Darwin negotiates complicated relationships …
  • … SOURCES Books Browne, Janet. Darwin's Origin of Species: A Biography. (2008 …
  • … so pleasant receiving letters.” Letter 68 —Darwin to William Darwin Fox [15 July 1829] …
  • … must take to complete his degree. Letter 78 —Darwin to William Darwin Fox [25 Mar 1830] …
  • … visit beetling in Cambridgeshire. Letter 98 —Darwin to Caroline Darwin [28 Apr 1831] …
  • … DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 1. Do you think Darwin resented that his work was published under …
  • … letters to his brother Erasmus? 4. Why do you think Darwin was unable to take courses in …
  • … EXPERIMENT In order to experience some of Darwin's observations and experiments with …

Darwin's health

Summary

On 28 March 1849, ten years before Origin was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker from Great Malvern in Worcestershire, where Dr James Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to…

Matches: 17 hits

  • … March 1849, ten years before  Origin  was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker …
  • … Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to …
  • … See the letter At various periods in his life Darwin suffered from gastrointestinal …
  • … fatigue, trembling, faintness, and dizziness. In 1849, Darwin’s symptoms became so severe that he …
  • … for three months while he took Dr Gully’s water cure. In Darwin’s letter to Hooker, he described Dr …
  • … See the letter After returning from Malvern, Darwin continued his hydropathic …
  • … 1863. In a letter to Hooker in April of 1861, for example, Darwin used his delicate physiology to …
  • … Edward Wickstead Lane, and at Ilkley with Dr Edmund Smith, Darwin sought advice from his consulting …
  • … of a fashionable spinal ice treatment. In April 1864, Darwin attributed his improved health to Dr …
  • … to J. D. Hooker, 13 April [1864] ) Why was Darwin’s so ill? Historians and others have …
  • … that there were psychological or psychosomatic dimensions to Darwin’s most severe periods of crisis. …
  • … letter to F. T. Buckland, 15 December [1864] ). On Darwin’s early stomach troubles, see …
  • … , and letter to Robert FitzRoy, [20 February 1840] . Darwin’s health diary (Down House MS), which …
  • … occurrences of flatulence (see Colp 1977, pp. 46-7). Darwin first mentioned attacks of …
  • … daily (see Correspondence vol. 12, letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [6 May 1864] ). …
  • … up food.  In his letter to Chapman of 16 May [1865] , Darwin stated that his sickness was ‘always …
  • … 64). Fainting and ‘rocking’ had been recorded in Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242) on several occasions …

Referencing women’s work

Summary

Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, but whether and how they were acknowledged in print involved complex considerations of social standing, professional standing, and personal preference.…

Matches: 14 hits

  • Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, …
  • … set of selected letters is followed by letters relating to Darwin's 1881 publication …
  • … throughout Variation . Letter 2395 - Darwin to Holland, Miss, [April 1860] …
  • … anonymised and masculinised. Letter 3316 - Darwin to Nevill, D. F., [12 November …
  • … Nevill is referenced by name for her “kindness” in Darwin’s Fertilisation of Orchids . …
  • … critic. Letter 4370 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [April - May 1865] Darwin
  • … as “friends in Surrey”. Letter 4794 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [25 March 1865] …
  • … B”. Letter 7060 - Wedgwood, F. J. to Darwin, [1867 - 72] Darwin’s …
  • … in the final publication. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [9 June 1867 - …
  • … in Expression . Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., [30 January 1868 …
  • … baby in Mary Barton. Letter 8321 - Darwin to Litchfield, H. E., [13 May …
  • … at him. Letter 7345 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [15 June 1872] Darwin’s …
  • … I can implicitly rely”. Letter 8427 - Darwin to Litchfield H. E., [25 July 1872] …
  • … contribution to the same work was carefully referenced , Darwin made no mention of Henrietta’s …

Interview with Emily Ballou

Summary

Emily Ballou is a writer of novels and screenplays, and a prize-winning poet. Her book The Darwin Poems, which explores aspects of Darwin’s life and thoughts through the medium of poetry, was recently published by the University of Western Australia Press.…

Matches: 18 hits

  • … and screenplays, and a prize-winning poet. Her book The Darwin Poems , which explores aspects of …
  • … most recently, of poetry, and [who] has written a book about Darwin in verse. We’re very happy to …
  • … and? 2. The idea of writing about Darwin Dr White: I’d …
  • … which in the 19th century was called Weatherboard, and Darwin went to Weatherboard on the tail end …
  • … I did every day. I’ve done that walk hundreds of times. Darwin did it twice. He took it on the way …
  • … to a rock was a small metal plaque and it said, ?Charles Darwin passed this way.? And although I …
  • … place that I love so much?? And I started to write about Darwin on that walk. So, I wrote several …
  • … At first I thought perhaps I would write about Darwin in Australia, and then as I travelled to the …
  • … And that was at a very young age, so I suppose the idea of Darwin, although I wouldn’t necessarily …
  • … I mean, when I decided I wanted to write a poem about Darwin, I went and got the journal of the …
  • … I could have written an entirely different book: still The Darwin Poems, but it could have just been …
  • … Banana. Now, that’s a poem. That’s a poem. Darwin wrote it entirely himself, and I could …
  • … itself. So, there would have been ways to, just using Darwin’s own words, create a book of …
  • … involve a lot of exposition and in a way a fictionalising of Darwin – although I do that to a degree …
  • … children; and even from, I guess, myself, standing outside Darwin; as well as Darwin. So that’s why …
  • … 4. How did your research affect your view of Darwin? Dr White: You did …
  • … book. Your own experiences in the sort of landscapes that Darwin visited; and then looking at his …
  • … doing this research changed, if it changed, your views of Darwin: if your views of Darwin evolved …
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