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To Asa Gray   1 January [1857]

Summary

Thanks AG for 2d part of "Statistics [of the flora of the northern U. S.", Am. J. Sci. 2d ser. 22 (1856): 204–32; 2d ser. 23 (1857): 62–84, 369–403].

Is glad AG concludes species of large genera are wide-ranging, but is "riled" that he thinks the line of connection of alpine plants is through Greenland. Mentions comparisons of ranges worth investigating.

Believes trees show a tendency toward separation of the sexes and wonders if U. S. species bear this out. Asks which genera are protean in U. S.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  1 Jan [1857]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (7)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2034

Matches: 8 hits

  • … 24 November [1856] , and letter from Asa Gray, 4 November 1856 . …
  • … 10 December [1856] , and letter from J.  D. Hooker, 7 December 1856 . …
  • … See also letters to Asa Gray , 24 August [1856] and …
  • … In his letter to Asa Gray, 2 May [1856] , CD had asked Gray to examine the ranges of …
  • … about this topic after having first mentioned it in his letter to Asa Gray, 2 May [1856] . …
  • … by the relationship to the letter from Asa Gray, 16 February 1857 . A.  Gray 1856–7 . …
  • … letter from Asa Gray, 1 June 1857 . See letters to J.  D. Hooker, 1 December [1856] and …
  • letter from Asa Gray, 16 February 1857 . CD refers to the section entitled ‘Comparison of the flora of the northern United States with that of Europe in respect to the similar or related species’ ( A.  Gray 1856– …

To Asa Gray   24 November [1856]

Summary

Variability of naturalised plants.

Distribution of Arctic/alpine plant species.

Limits to the northern range of plants.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  24 Nov [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (5)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1999

Matches: 5 hits

  • … Gray, 12 October [1856] . See letter from Asa Gray, 23 September 1856 . …
  • … Dated by the reference to the letter from Asa Gray, 4 November 1856 . Letter from Asa …
  • … Gray, 4 November 1856 . See letter to Asa …
  • … the Darwin Library–CUL. CD refers to the first part of A.  Gray 1856–7 . See letter to Asa …
  • … Gray, 12 October [1856] and n.  5. See letter to J.  D. Hooker, 18 November [1856] . A.   …

To Asa Gray   14 July [1856]

Summary

Asks whether Allegheny Mountains are sufficiently continuous so that plants could travel from north to south along them.

Hopes AG’s work on geographical distribution is progressing, as he has questions on plants common to Europe which do not range up to Arctic.

Are intermediate varieties less numerous in individuals than the varieties they connect?

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  14 July [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the New York Botanical Garden (Charles Finney Cox Collection)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1926

Matches: 5 hits

  • … Hooker, 5 July [1856] . Letter to Asa Gray, 2 May [1856] . …
  • … letter to Asa Gray, 2 May [1856] , and the letters exchanged between Gray and CD in 1855 ( …
  • … Dated by the relationship to the letter to Asa Gray, 2 May [1856] . See …
  • … This point is made in Wollaston 1856 , pp.  105–6. See CD’s comments in letter to J.   D. …
  • letter to Sir W. J. Hooker. London Journal of Botany 1 (1842): 1–14, 217–37; 2 (1843): 113-25; 3 (1844): 230–42. Gray, Asa. 1856– …

To Asa Gray   12 October [1856]

Summary

Thanks AG for the first part of his "Statistics [of the flora of the northern U. S.", Am. J. Sci. 2d ser. 22 (1856): 204–32; 2d ser. 23 (1857): 62–84, 369–403]

and for information on social and varying plants.

Would like to know number of genera of introduced plants in U. S.

Is surprised at some affinities of northern U. S. flora and asks for any climatic explanations.

Asks what proportion of genera common to U. S. and Europe are mundane.

Is glad AG will work out the northern ranges of the European species and the ranges of species with regard to size of genera.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  12 Oct [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (6)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1973

Matches: 7 hits

  • … Dated by the reference to A.  Gray 1856–7  and to the letter from Asa …
  • … Gray, 23 September 1856 . Letter from Asa Gray, 23 September 1856 . A.  Gray 1856–7 . CD’s …
  • … selection , p.  232. See letter from Asa Gray, 4 November 1856 . See Correspondence …
  • … Certainly J.D.H. ’. See also letter from Asa Gray, 4 November 1856 . Gray did not give the …
  • … of his independently paginated reprint. See letter to J.  D. Hooker, 9 October [1856] . …
  • letter), but these had only been allocated to their taxonomic orders, not genera. The same list was repeated, with additional information but still excluding the number of genera, in A.  Gray 1856– …
  • letter to J.  D. Hooker, 8 [November 1855] , n.  3. CD thought the statistical relationships Candolle had discerned were probably due only to ‘parentage’ and common descent when applied to large groups like families and orders. In CD’s copy of A.  Gray 1856– …

To Asa Gray   24 August [1856]

Summary

Rarity of intermediate varieties.

Variability of introduced plants.

Ranges of plants common to Europe and U. S.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  24 Aug [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (36)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1944

Matches: 6 hits

  • Letter from Asa Gray, [early August 1856] , which CD had marked ‘Received Aug 20 th . / …
  • … Thomas Vernon Wollaston . See letter to Asa Gray, 14 July [1856] . CD discussed the point …
  • … supplied by Gray (see letter from Asa Gray, 4 November [1856] ). The number 321 refers to …
  • … to CD enclosed in the letter from Asa Gray, [early August 1856] . Gray addressed CD’s …
  • … Watson, [after 10 June 1856] . Letter from H.  C. Watson, 20 June 1856 . Watson’s …
  • … as his sources. Letter from H.  C. Watson, 5 June 1856 . Watson 1835 . Letter to H.  C. …

To Asa Gray   [after 15 March 1857]

Summary

Urges AG to generalise from his observations on the flora of the northern U. S.

Expected to find separation of sexes in trees because he believes all living beings require an occasional cross, and none is perpetually self-fertilising. The multitude of flowers of a tree would be an obstacle to cross-fertilisation unless the sexes tended to be separate.

The Leguminosae are CD’s greatest opposers; he cannot find that garden varieties ever cross. Could AG inquire of intelligent nurserymen on the subject?

Thanks AG for information on protean genera; much wants to know whether their great variability is due to their conditions of existence or is innate in them at all times and places.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  [After 15 Mar 1857]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (8)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2060

Matches: 5 hits

  • … Asa Gray, 1 January [1857] . See letters to George Bentham , 26 November [1856] and …
  • … 30 November [1856] . See letter to Syms Covington, 22 February 1857 . William Macarthur …
  • … December [1856] . CD refers to his anecdote about Louis Agassiz related in the letter to …
  • … 61–2, and Origin , pp.  99–100. See also letters to J.  D. Hooker, 1 December [1856] and …
  • … 15 March [1857] . Letter from Asa Gray, 16 February 1857 . A.  Gray 1856–7  was published …

To Asa Gray   21 July [1855]

Summary

Geographical distribution. "Close" species. Hopes AG will write an essay on species.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  21 July [1855]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (3)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1725

Matches: 1 hit

  • … Asa Gray, 30 June 1855 . A.  Gray 1856–7 . See letter from Asa Gray, 22 May 1855 . See …

To Asa Gray   20 July [1857]

Summary

Believes species have arisen, like domestic varieties, with much extinction, and that there are no such things as independently created species. Explains why he believes species of the same genus generally have a common or continuous area; they are actual lineal descendants.

Discusses fertilisation in the bud and the insect pollination of papilionaceous flowers. His theory explains why, despite the risk of injury, cross-fertilisation is usual in the animal and vegetable kingdoms, even in hermaphrodites.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  20 July [1857]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (9b)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2125

Matches: 2 hits

  • … 16 October 1856] ). See letter from J.  D. Hooker, 9 November 1856 . CD alluded to the …
  • … chapter on geographical distribution (see letters to J.  D. Hooker, 30 July [1856] and [ …

To Asa Gray   2 May [1856]

Summary

Suggests affinities of the U. S. flora that he considers would be worth investigating. Wants to know the ranges of species in large and small genera.

Questions AG on naturalised plants; whether any are social in U. S. which are not so elsewhere and how variable they are compared with indigenous species. Would like to know of any differences in the variability of species at different points of their ranges and also the physical states of plants at the extremes of their ranges.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  2 May [1856]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (4)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1863

Matches: 3 hits

  • … CD makes in this letter, which were incorporated into A.  Gray 1856–7 (see n.  3, below). …
  • … Gray 1856–7 , p.  389). CD had explained his interest in this point in his letter to J.   …
  • letter to Asa Gray, 24 August [1855] ). Gray was preparing the first part of his paper ‘Statistics of the flora of the northern United States’ ( A.  Gray 1856– …

To Asa Gray   5 September [1857]

Summary

Encloses an abstract of his ideas on natural selection and the principle of divergence; the "means by which nature makes her species".

Discusses varieties and close species in large and small genera, finding some data from AG in conflict with his expectations.

Has been observing the action of bees in fertilising kidney beans and Lobelia.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  5 Sept [1857]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (48)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2136

Matches: 2 hits

  • … Gray had told him in the letter from Asa Gray, 4 November 1856 ) that he had not received …
  • letter from Asa Gray, 7 July 1857 . A.  Gray 1857a. Gray had already sent CD the third and final part of his ‘Statistics of the flora of the northern United States’ ( A.  Gray 1856– …

From H. C. Watson to Asa Gray   13 March 1857

Summary

Describes problems of classifying species in highly variable genera. Lists highly variable genera. Comments on the list of Asa Gray. Says species may be made to appear more or less variable according to whether a genus is divided into few or many species.

Author:  Hewett Cottrell Watson
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  13 Mar 1857
Classmark:  DAR 181: 36
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2065

Matches: 1 hit

  • … March 1857 . Hudson 1762 . Backhouse 1856 . See letter from Asa Gray, 16 February 1857 . …

To Asa Gray   8 June [1855]

Summary

Suggests AG append ranges to the species in the new edition of his Manual.

Is interested in comparing the flora of U. S. with that of Britain and wishes to know the proportions to the whole of the great leading families and the numbers of species within genera. Would welcome information on which species AG considers to be "close" in the U. S.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  8 June [1855]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (2)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1695

Matches: 1 hit

  • … edition of the Manual (A.  Gray 1856). See letter to Asa Gray, 25 April [1855] . Gray’s …

To Asa Gray   18 November [1858]

Summary

Wishes to know whether differences in constitution (such as disease susceptibility) are related to differences in complexion. "Liability to such a disease as yellow fever would answer my question in the best possible way."

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  18 Nov [1858]
Classmark:  Gray Herbarium of Harvard University (19)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2364

Matches: 2 hits

  • … 8 October – 7 November 1856 ). See also Descent 1: 244–5. See letter to Gardeners’ …
  • 1856 that ‘a sanguineous or choleric, or light complexioned man stands the African climate twice as well and as long again as the melancholic or dark complexioned man’ ( Correspondence vol.  6, letter

To Asa Gray   17 September [1861]

Summary

U. S. politics and relations with England.

Wants examples of dimorphism similar to Primula.

Structure and function of Spiranthes flower.

Observations and experiments on Drosera.

CD’s views on design.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  17 Sept [1861]
Classmark:  Gray Herbarium of Harvard University (72)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3256

Matches: 3 hits

  • … Olmsted 1856 ], a book he had lately been reading; and in his many letters to Professor …
  • … detestation. See letter to Asa Gray, 16 September [1861] . A.  Gray 1856, p.  80. The …
  • 1856 , 1857, and 1860) CD had read. See Correspondence vol.  4, Appendix IV, 128: 23, 25; and vol.  8, letter

To Asa Gray   9 May [1857]

Summary

Thanks for new part of "Statistics".

Interested in disjoined species; do they tend to belong to large or small genera, and are they generally members of small families?

Is glad AG will tackle introduced plants; has noticed that the proportion of a particular family to the whole flora tends to be similar in introduced and indigenous plants.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  9 May [1857]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (9)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2089

Matches: 2 hits

  • … Gray, 18 June [1857] . A.  Gray 1856–7 , p.  400. See letter to Asa Gray, [after 15 March …
  • 1856–7 , p.  387 n. ), to which CD refers: Out of 49 species belonging to these first and second heads, as many as 10 belong to monotypic genera, and 21 to genera of less than ten good species;—six of the species belong to the vast genus Carex;—on the whole rather militating against the idea that the geographical extension of species bears some proportion to the size of the genus they belong to. Part of CD’s confusion is a result of an error Gray made in his note (see letter

To Asa Gray   18 June [1857]

Summary

Thanks for AG’s remarks on disjoined species. CD’s notions are based on belief that disjoined species have suffered much extinction, which is the common cause of small genera and disjoined ranges.

Discusses out-crossing in plants.

Has failed to meet with a detailed account of regular and normal impregnation in the bud. Podostemon, Subularia, and underwater Leguminosae are the strongest cases against him.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  18 June [1857]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (9a)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2109

Matches: 1 hit

  • 1856–7 , the third part of his ‘Statistics of the flora of the northern United States’ (see letter

To Asa Gray   26 November [1860]

Summary

Has reread AG’s third Atlantic Monthly article. It is admirable, but CD cannot go as far as AG on design.

Mentions other opinions and reviews of Origin.

Relates some experiments on Drosera showing its extreme sensitivity; requests some observations on orchids.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  26 Nov [1860]
Classmark:  Gray Herbarium of Harvard University (27)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2998

Matches: 2 hits

  • letter to Asa Gray, 31 October [1860] and the enclosure. CD had read Frederick Law Olmsted’s two previous books about his tours through the slave states of America with great interest, remarking that Olmsted 1856   …
  • 1856, p.  350. CD remembered the plant growing in the garden of his father, Robert Waring Darwin ; he had ascertained its name by questioning Daniel Oliver . See letters

To Asa Gray   9 February [1868]

Summary

Asks that Gray forward a letter to J. T. Rothrock. Variation is selling well. Nearly all chapters were at least partially written before Origin was published.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  9 Feb [1868]
Classmark:  William Patrick Watson (dealer) (catalogue 19, 2013)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5851F

Matches: 1 hit

  • letter from John Murray, 6 February [1868] ); a second printing of 1200 copies appeared in February (Freeman 1977). CD’s ‘big book’ on species was originally drafted between 1856

To Asa Gray   29 November [1857]

Summary

Thanks AG for his criticisms of CD’s views; finds it difficult to avoid using the term "natural selection" as an agent.

Discusses crossing in Fumaria and barnacles.

Has received a naturally crossed kidney bean in which the seed-coat has been affected by the pollen of the fertilising plant.

Finds the rule of large genera having most varieties holds good and regards it as most important for his "principle of divergence".

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  29 Nov [1857]
Classmark:  Archives of the Gray Herbarium, Harvard University (18)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2176

Matches: 1 hit

  • … in Gärtner 1849 (see letter to M.  J. Berkeley, 29 February [1856] ). CD described this …

To Asa Gray   26 September [1860]

Summary

Has read sheets of AG’s third Atlantic Monthly article [Oct 1860] and praises it and AG’s other reviews and articles highly.

Is surprised at the inability of others to grasp the meaning of natural selection.

Has been testing the sensitivity of Drosera, which he finds remarkable.

Asks if AG will be able to make some observations on orchids for him.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Asa Gray
Date:  26 Sept [1860]
Classmark:  Gray Herbarium of Harvard University (28)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2930

Matches: 1 hit

  • … in 1856 (see Correspondence vol.  6). The reference is to Karl Ernst von Baer . See letter
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Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … On 14 May 1856, Charles Darwin recorded in his journal that he ‘Began by Lyell’s advice  writing …

Darwin and Fatherhood

Summary

Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten children. It is often assumed that Darwin was an exceptional Victorian father. But how extraordinary was he? The Correspondence Project allows an unusually…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Re: Design – performance version – 25 March 2007 – 1 Re: Design – Adaptation of the …

Origin

Summary

Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of his wish to establish priority for the species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of his wish to …

Six things Darwin never said – and one he did

Summary

Spot the fakes! Darwin is often quoted – and as often misquoted. Here are some sayings regularly attributed to Darwin that never flowed from his pen.

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Spot the fakes! Darwin is often quoted – and as often misquoted. Here are some sayings regularly …

Dates of composition of Darwin's manuscript on species

Summary

Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s manuscript on species (DAR 8--15.1, inclusive; transcribed and published as Natural selection). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Observers |  Fieldwork |  Experimentation |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants …

Descent

Summary

There are more than five hundred letters associated with the research and writing of Darwin’s book, Descent of man and selection in relation to sex (Descent). They trace not only the tortuous route to eventual publication, but the development of Darwin’s…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … ‘ Our ancestor was an animal which breathed water, had a swim-bladder, a great swimming …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to …

Before Origin: the ‘big book’

Summary

Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the very day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles (Darwin's Journal). He had long considered the question of species. In 1842, he outlined a theory of transmutation in a…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the very day he concluded his …

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Friendship | Mentors | Class | Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific …

Thomas Henry Huxley

Summary

Dubbed “Darwin’s bulldog” for his combative role in controversies over evolution, Huxley was a leading Victorian zoologist, science popularizer, and education reformer. He was born in Ealing, a small village west of London, in 1825. With only two years of…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Dubbed “Darwin’s bulldog” for his combative role in controversies over evolution, Huxley was a …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of …

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I …

Language: key letters

Summary

How and why language evolved bears on larger questions about the evolution of the human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the development of human speech from animal sounds in The Descent of Man (1871),…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … The origin of language was investigated in a wide range of disciplines in the nineteenth century. …

Hermann Müller

Summary

Hermann (Heinrich Ludwig Hermann) Müller, was born in Mühlberg near Erfurt in 1829. He was the younger brother of Fritz Müller (1822–97). Following the completion of his secondary education at Erfurt in 1848, he studied natural sciences at Halle and Berlin…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Hermann (Heinrich Ludwig Hermann) Müller, was born in Mühlberg near Erfurt in 1829. He was the …

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children,[1] began the research that …

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet …

Correlation of growth: deaf blue-eyed cats, pigs, and poison

Summary

As he was first developing his ideas, among the potential problems Darwin recognised with natural selection was how to account for developmental change that conferred no apparent advantage.  He proposed a ‘mysterious law’ of ‘correlation of growth’ where…

Matches: 1 hits

  • …   Darwin made many changes to the text of Origin across different editions as he …

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwin’s mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and …
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