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State Darwin Museum, Moscow, Russia

Matches: 2 hits

  • … State Darwin Museum, …
  • … Moscow, Russia Darwin Museum Moscow …

Darwin Archive, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, England

Matches: 1 hit

  • Darwin Archive, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge, England DAR …

The History Buff (website) www.ehistorybuff.com/darwin_als.html

Matches: 1 hit

  • … The History Buff (website) www.ehistorybuff.com/darwin_als.html History Buff …

To the Darwin children   17 [January 1880]

Summary

Thanks his children for their present of a fur coat.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Sara Sedgwick; Sara Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  17 [Jan 1880]
Classmark:  DAR 211: 1
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-12429

Matches: 19 hits

  • … To the Darwin children   17 [January 1880] …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. E. …
  • … Sedgwick, Sara Darwin, …
  • … Sara Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR 211: 1 Charles Robert Darwin Down 17 [Jan …
  • … 1880] Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Sara …
  • … Sedgwick/Sara Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …

To the Darwin children   10 January 1880

Summary

Circular letter regarding the distribution of CD’s excess income, with a note addressed to W. E. Darwin concerning his handling of Elizabeth Darwin’s share.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  10 Jan 1880
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 155
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-12414

Matches: 19 hits

  • … To the Darwin children   10 January 1880 …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR 210.6: 155 Charles Robert Darwin Down 10 Jan …
  • … 1880 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …
  • … distribution of CD’s excess income, with a note addressed to W. E. Darwin concerning his …
  • … handling of Elizabeth Darwin’s share. …

From the Darwin children   17 January 1880

Summary

Send CD a present of a fur coat.

Author:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Sara Sedgwick; Sara Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  17 Jan 1880
Classmark:  DAR 99: 208
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-12428

Matches: 19 hits

  • … From the Darwin children   17 January 1880 …
  • Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. E. …
  • … Sedgwick, Sara Darwin, …
  • … Sara Darwin, H. E. …
  • … Litchfield, H. E. Darwin, C. R. …
  • … DAR 99: 208 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Sara …
  • … Sedgwick/Sara Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield unstated …
  • … 17 Jan 1880 Charles Robert Darwin

To Darwin Children   8 January 1882

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Summary

Advises his children as to how some money will be distributed among them.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  8 Jan 1882
Classmark:  DAR 185: 60
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-13603

Matches: 17 hits

  • … To Darwin Children   8 January 1882 …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR 185: 60 Charles Robert Darwin Down 8 Jan …
  • … 1882 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …

To the Darwin children   21 February 1879

Summary

Circular about the distribution of the overplus of his income and advice on investment.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  21 Feb 1879
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 153
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-11896

Matches: 17 hits

  • … To the Darwin children   21 February 1879 …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR 210.6: 153 Charles Robert Darwin Down 21 Feb …
  • … 1879 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …

To the Darwin children   3 January 1881

Summary

About the distribution of [surplus income] funds among the children.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  3 Jan 1881
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 169
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-12972

Matches: 17 hits

  • … To the Darwin children   3 January 1881 …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR 210.6: 169 Charles Robert Darwin Down 3 Jan …
  • … 1881 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …

To CD’s Children   16 September 1881

Summary

A circular letter on the distribution of his money at death and the division ofErasmus’ estate.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  16 Sept 1881
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 183
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-13340

Matches: 16 hits

To CD’s executors & other children   20 December 1881

Summary

Has promised to pay Hooker about £250 annually "for the formation of a perfect MS catalogue of all known plants [Index Kewensis]".

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  20 Dec 1881
Classmark:  DAR (CD library—Index Kewensis tom. 1)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-13570

Matches: 16 hits

  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin, G. …
  • … H. Darwin, …
  • … Horace Darwin, …
  • … Leonard Darwin, W. …
  • … E. Darwin, H. E. Litchfield, H. E. …
  • … DAR (CD library— Index Kewensis tom.  1) Charles Robert Darwin Down 20 Dec …
  • … 1881 Elizabeth (Bessy) (Lizzy) Darwin
  • … Francis Darwin George …
  • … Howard Darwin
  • … Horace Darwin
  • … Leonard Darwin William …
  • … Erasmus Darwin Henrietta …
  • … Emma Darwin/Henrietta Emma Litchfield …

From Edward Levett Darwin   7 September 1863

Summary

Glad to find they are cousins.

Sends his book [High Elms (pseud.), The game-preserver’s manual (1858)].

Author:  Edward Levett Darwin
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  7 Sept 1863
Classmark:  DAR 99: 17–18
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4295

Matches: 34 hits

  • … From Edward Levett Darwin   7 September 1863 …
  • Darwin, E. …
  • … L. Darwin, C. R. …
  • … DAR 99: 17–18 Edward Levett Darwin Derby 7 Sept …
  • … 1863 Charles Robert Darwin
  • … day or other it will result in being personal . Yours very sincerely | Edw d L Darwin Chr. …
  • Darwin Esq | F.R.S. …
  • … cousin, once removed ( Darwin pedigree ). CD and his family had gone to Malvern Wells, …
  • … printed. 1888. [Reprinted in facsimile in Darwin pedigrees , by Richard Broke Freeman. …
  • … An appeal. [By Charles and Emma Darwin. ] [Bromley, Kent]: [privately printed. ] [ …
  • … Correspondence : The correspondence of Charles Darwin. Edited by Frederick Burkhardt et …
  • … Cambridge University Press. 1985–. [Darwin, Edward Levett. ] 1859. The game-preserver’s …
  • … a common one yet there are I know other Darwins. Your Wife sent me 2/1 for a copy of the …
  • … Edward Darwin was CD’s first cousin, son of …
  • … his father’s half-brother, Francis Sacheverel Darwin ( …
  • Darwin pedigree ). …
  • … No other correspondence between CD and Edward Darwin has been found. …
  • … Emma Darwin had apparently sent for a copy of …
  • … considerably enlarged’ edition of Edward Darwin’s Game preserver’s manual , which was …
  • … published in 1863 ( E.  L.  Darwin 1863 ). …
  • … Emma Darwin had apparently …
  • … sent Edward Darwin a copy of An appeal , a four-page circular concerning the cruelty of …
  • … s manual are the only works by Edward Darwin listed in the NSTC . The reference may be to …
  • … particular procedures necessary for trapping foxes ( [E.  L. Darwin] 1859 , pp.  25–6). …
  • … Marcus Huish, of Castle Donnington, Leicestershire, was married to Edward Darwin’s sister, …
  • … Frances Sarah ( Darwin pedigree ). The reference is to Samuel Boteler and …
  • … Hall, Nottinghamshire; Samuel Boteler Bristowe was CD’s and Edward Darwin’s second …
  • … Field office. Derby: W. Bemrose & Sons. Darwin, Edward Levett. 1863. The game-preserver’s …
  • … act" of 1862. 4th edition. Buxton, Derbyshire: the author. Darwin pedigree : Pedigree of …
  • … the family of Darwin. Compiled by H. Farnham Burke. N.p. : …
  • … August (see letter from G.  B.  Sowerby Jr to Emma Darwin, 22 July 1863, and Appendix IX). …
  • … See also letter from Emma Darwin to W.  D.  Fox, [ …
  • … September 1863] . The two parts of Edward Darwin’s Game preserver’s manual dealt with the …
  • … steel trap stands, as it always must, pre-eminent’ ( [E.  L.  Darwin] 1859 , p.  22). The …

From Charles and Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin   [13 January 1861]

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Summary

Two letters for WED at E. A. Darwin's. G. H. Darwin has been to dentist. Please collect and pay for GHD’s skates.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin; Emma Wedgwood; Emma Darwin
Addressee:  William Erasmus Darwin
Date:  [13 Jan 1861]
Classmark:  DAR 185: 117
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3046F

Matches: 23 hits

  • Darwin, C. R. …
  • … Wedgwood, Emma Darwin, …
  • … Emma Darwin, W. E. …
  • … From Charles and Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin   [13 January 1861] …
  • … DAR 185: 117 Charles Robert Darwin Emma …
  • … Wedgwood/Emma Darwin [13 Jan …
  • … 1861] William Erasmus Darwin
  • … Two letters for WED at E. A. Darwin's. G. …
  • … H. Darwin has been to dentist. Please collect and pay for GHD’s skates. …
  • … London. B. at 2 o .30’— Your affect | C.  Darwin Dear Wm, I expect Eva will come with you, …
  • … 11 January 1861, and left on 21 January (Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242)). Emma was mistaken …
  • … The letter is dated by the reference to George Howard Darwin’s dental treatment (see n.   …
  • … 3, below) and references in Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242; see nn.  2 and 8, below). …
  • … Sunday. CD refers to his brother, Erasmus Alvey Darwin, who lived at 6 Queen Anne Street, …
  • … London, and to Francis and George Howard Darwin, who, according …
  • … to Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242), went to London on 10 January 1861, returning to Down on …
  • … treatment between December 1860 and February 1861 (see letter from G.  H.  Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin, [9 December 1860] (DAR …
  • … 251: 2226), letters from Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E. Darwin, [30 January 1861] (DAR 219.1: 36), [12 February 1861] (DAR 219.1: 37), and [20  …
  • … further identified. London Bridge station. Emma Darwin added this note to CD’s letter. The …
  • … House with William on 14 January 1861 (Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242)); to the London home …

To the Darwin Family    3 October 1828

Summary

[Caroline Darwin on behalf of CD] submits a petition to Darwin family for £20 to purchase a new double-barrelled gun, CD’s present one having become dangerous.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Darwin family
Date:  3 Oct 1828
Classmark:  L
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-50

Matches: 14 hits

  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin family …
  • … To the Darwin Family    3 October 1828 …
  • … L Charles Robert Darwin [Shrewsbury] 3 …
  • … Oct 1828 Darwin family …
  • … The ‘petition’ is in Caroline Darwin’s hand. The subscribers’ names are in their own …
  • … requisite for the purchase of new Double barrd Gun— Value £20— £.  s.  d. W Darwin 5= 0 …
  • … = 0 Miss Darwin 5 . …
  • … 0– 0 Miss Susan Darwin 5 "  0 . …
  • … 0 Miss Cath Darwin 5 "  0 "  0. …
  • … Caroline Darwin on behalf of CD] …
  • … submits a petition to Darwin family for £20 to purchase a new double-barrelled gun, CD’s …
  • … a Distressed Sportsman— 1828. Oct 3— Charles Darwin gent—humbly petitions all benevolently …
  • … liable to destroy the aforesaid Charles Darwins legs arms, body & brains & consequently …

From Francis Parker   22 April 1867

Summary

Sends £600 bequeathed by Susan Darwin to CD’s younger children.

Author:  Francis (Frank) Parker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  22 Apr 1867
Classmark:  DAR 174: 19
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5510

Matches: 25 hits

  • … Parker, Francis Darwin, C. R. …
  • … DAR 174: 19 Francis (Frank) Parker Chester 22 Apr 1867 Charles Robert Darwin
  • … Sends £600 bequeathed by Susan Darwin to CD’s younger children. …
  • … Correspondence : The correspondence of Charles Darwin. Edited by Frederick Burkhardt et …
  • … 100 Henrietta Emma Darwin …  100  …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin .... . . 100 Cha …
  • … s . Rob t . Darwin (Specific Legacy— a …
  • … portrait of Miss Darwins father —valued at …
  • … £4—) Henrietta Emma Darwin (a Silver Tea Urn—valued at £28 . 2 . 6)— …
  • … Susan Elizabeth Darwin, CD’s sister, died in October 1866 (see Correspondence vol.  14). …
  • … were the executors of her will (Susan Elizabeth Darwin’s will, Probate Registry, York). …
  • … Robert Waring Darwin. …
  • … I am | Yours very sincerely | Francis Parker Charles Darwin Esq re . Down Bromley Kent. …
  • … Extract from the Will of the late Miss Susan Elizabeth Darwin dated 1 st . November  …
  • … 1865— “I give and bequeath to my nephews George Howard Darwin, …
  • … Francis Darwin   …
  • … Leonard Darwin, and …
  • … Horace Darwin and my …
  • … nieces Henrietta Emma Darwin and …
  • … Elizabeth Darwin (the younger sons and daughters …
  • … of my Brother Charles Robert Darwin) One hundred pounds each”— I send you in a separate …
  • … cover the Undermentioned Legacy receipts for signature— Value Geo. Howard Darwin …  100  …
  • … Francis Darwin .... . …
  • … 100 Leonard Darwin .... . …
  • … 100 Horace Darwin . ....  …

From E. A. Darwin   19 February [1866]

Summary

Division of Catherine’s estate.

Arrangements for EAD’s will.

Wishes CD would pay him another visit.

Author:  Erasmus Alvey Darwin
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  19 Feb [1866]
Classmark:  DAR 105: B40–1
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5010

Matches: 24 hits

  • Darwin, E. …
  • … A. Darwin, C. R. …
  • … From E.  A.  Darwin   19 February [1866] …
  • … DAR 105: B40–1 Erasmus Alvey Darwin unstated 19 Feb [ …
  • … 1866] Charles Robert Darwin
  • … calendar of the correspondence of Charles Darwin, 1821–1882. With supplement. 2d edition. …
  • … University calendar. Cambridge: W. Page [and others]. 1796–1950. Darwin, Francis. 1916. …
  • … Memoir of Sir George Darwin. …
  • … In Scientific papers , by George Howard Darwin. Vol. 5. …
  • … this letter and the letter from E.  A.  Darwin, 17 February [1866]. The letter from CD has …
  • … been found. See letter from E.  A.  Darwin, 17 February [1866]. Emily Catherine Langton ( …
  • … Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Darwin pedigree : Pedigree of …
  • … the family of Darwin. Compiled by H. Farnham Burke. N.p. : …
  • … printed. 1888. [Reprinted in facsimile in Darwin pedigrees , by Richard Broke Freeman. …
  • … Freeman, Richard Broke. 1978. Charles Darwin: a companion. Folkestone, Kent: William …
  • … 13301)). William Erasmus Darwin was CD’s eldest son. George became an undergraduate …
  • … University calendar 1867, p.  400, F.  Darwin 1916 ). The references are to the family of …
  • … Allen, lived near Tenby at Cresselly, South Wales ( Darwin pedigree , Freeman 1978 ). …
  • … of Emily Catherine Langton. Susan Elizabeth Darwin was the the younger of CD and Erasmus’s …
  • … had attended Catherine when she was dying (undated letter from H.  E. Darwin to G.   …
  • … H.  Darwin (DAR 245: 273)). …
  • … George Howard Darwin was CD’s second son. …
  • … s death in 1881, George and William Erasmus Darwin appear to have acted as executors (see …
  • … letter from G.  H.  Darwin, 28 August 1881 ( Calendar no.   …

To W. E. Darwin   30 [October 1862]

Summary

Thanks WED for observations on Lythrum.

Discusses family affairs.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Erasmus Darwin
Date:  30 [Oct 1862]
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 107
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3789

Matches: 29 hits

  • … to W.  E.  Darwin, [25 October 1862] . …
  • … To W.  E.  Darwin   30 [October 1862] …
  • Darwin, C. …
  • … R. Darwin, W. E. …
  • … DAR 210.6: 107 Charles Robert Darwin Down 30 [Oct …
  • … 1862] William Erasmus Darwin
  • … by the relationship to the letter from W.  E.  Darwin, 28 October 1862 . See letter to …
  • … W.  E.  Darwin, [25 October 1862] and n.  2, and letter …
  • … from W.  E.  Darwin, 28 October 1862 . CD reported this observation in ‘Three forms of …
  • … My dear old fellow | Your affect | C.  Darwin Months hence will do about counting seed; …
  • … and the letters from Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin, [19 November 1862] and [2 December 1862? ], in DAR 219.1: 67–8). William had …
  • … DAR 226.1). See letter from W.  E.  Darwin, 21 October [1862] and n.  4, and letter …
  • … papers : The collected papers of Charles Darwin. Edited by Paul H. Barrett. 2 vols. …
  • … good effects of intercrossing. By Charles Darwin. London: John Murray. 1862. ‘Three forms …
  • … three forms of Lythrum salicaria. By Charles Darwin. [Read 16 June 1864. ] Journal of the …
  • … and Hampshire Bank, Southampton. Henrietta Emma Darwin. See letter to J.  D.  Hooker, 27 [ …
  • … s visit to Down House on 31 October, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary (DAR 242): ‘Ch. …
  • … Lubbock, 25 October 1862 , n.  5. Elizabeth Darwin started at a school in Kensington run …
  • … by Miss Buob, on 27 January 1863 (see Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242), …
  • … and the letter from Emma Darwin to W.   …
  • … E.  Darwin, [29 October 1862], in DAR 219.1: …
  • … 63). The Darwins’ governess, Camilla Ludwig, was on an extended visit to her family in …
  • … in order to separate her from Horace Darwin. The Down surgeon, Stephen Paul Engleheart, …
  • … from which he had been suffering earlier in the year. See the letters from Emma Darwin to …
  • … William Erasmus Darwin, [2 March 1862], [27 May 1862], and [6 November  …
  • … in DAR 219.1: 49, 57, 64; see also Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242), and CD’s Classed account …
  • … of Down. On Saturday 1 November 1862, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary (DAR 242) that …
  • … having become friendly with Elinor Mary Bonham-Carter (see Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242), …

From E. A. Darwin   20 May [1880]

Summary

Thanks for two pamphlets;

Otto Zöckler’s [Darwin’s Grossvater (1880)] he thinks worthless.

Author:  Erasmus Alvey Darwin
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  20 May [1880]
Classmark:  DAR 105: B112
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-12611

Matches: 11 hits

  • Darwin, E. …
  • … A. Darwin, C. R. …
  • … From E.  A.  Darwin   20 May [1880] …
  • … DAR 105: B112 Erasmus Alvey Darwin unstated 20 May [ …
  • … 1880] Charles Robert Darwin
  • … for two pamphlets; Otto Zöckler’s [ Darwin’s Grossvater (1880)] he thinks worthless. …
  • … Bibliography Erasmus Darwin. By Ernst Krause. Translated from the German by …
  • … W. S. Dallas, with a preliminary notice by Charles Darwin. London: John Murray. 1879. …
  • … Ferrari, Henri. 1880. Érasme Darwin. [ …
  • … Review of Erasmus Darwin . ] Revue scientifique de la France et de l’étranger 2d ser. …
  • … 9: 1090–4 Zöckler, Otto. 1880. Darwin’s Großvater als Arzt, Dichter und Naturphilosoph. …

From Reginald Darwin   29 March 1879

Summary

Sends Dr Erasmus Darwin’s commonplace book, some letters, and poems.

Family news.

Author:  Reginald Darwin
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  29 Mar 1879
Classmark:  DAR 99: 146–9
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-11960

Matches: 10 hits

  • Darwin, …
  • … Reginald Darwin, C. R. …
  • … From Reginald Darwin   29 March 1879 …
  • … DAR 99: 146–9 Reginald Darwin Buxton 29 Mar …
  • … 1879 Charles Robert Darwin
  • … Sends Dr Erasmus Darwin’s commonplace book, some letters, and poems. Family news. …
  • … King-Hele, Desmond. 1999. Erasmus Darwin. A life of unequalled achievement. London: Giles …
  • … de la Mare Publishers. Krause, Ernst. 1879a. Erasmus Darwin, der Großvater …
  • … und Vorkämpfer Charles Darwin’s: ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Descendenz-Theorie. Kosmos …
  • … 9): 397–424. Seward, Anna. 1804. Memoirs of the life of Dr. Darwin. London: J. Johnson. …
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CCD intro in Commentary
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Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1876 on this website.  The full texts …
  • … 24 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge …
  • … The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the …
  • … games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wife … poor creature, has won …
  • … regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to …
  • … four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11 …
  • … once, the labour of checking proofs proved a blessing, as Darwin sought solace for the loss of his …
  • … and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and …
  • … had involved much time and effort the previous year, and Darwin clearly wanted to focus his …
  • … When Smith, Elder and Company proposed reissuing two of Darwin’s three volumes of the geology of …
  • … single-volume edition titled Geological observations , Darwin resisted making any revisions at …
  • … volume, Coral reefs , already in its second edition. Darwin was nevertheless ‘firmly resolved not …
  • … meticulous correction of errors in the German editions made Darwin less anxious about correcting the …
  • … to Carus. ( Letter to J. V. Carus, 24 April 1876. ) Darwin focused instead on the second …
  • … concentrated on the ‘means of crossing’, was seen by Darwin as the companion to Cross and self …
  • … return to old work than part of the future work outlined by Darwin in his ‘little Autobiography’ ( …
  • … holiday after finishing Cross and self fertilisation , Darwin took up the suggestion made by a …
  • … for his family only. Writing for an hour every afternoon, Darwin finished his account on 3 August …
  • … dimittis.”’ (‘Recollections’, pp. 418–19). Darwin remained firm in his resolution to …
  • … ever return to the consideration of man.’ In particular, Darwin seemed eager to avoid issues that …
  • … wrote with the good news that he could restore Darwin to a religious life. This transformation would …
  • … that used to be called transmigration, Nemo pointed out to Darwin, adding, ‘the term nowadays is …
  • … enemies... Views such as these were easy enough for Darwin to dismiss, but it was more …

Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

Matches: 29 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1878 on this website.  The full texts …
  • … 26 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge …
  • … lessen injury to leaves from radiation In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to …
  • … in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of experiments to …
  • … plant laboratories in Europe. While Francis was away, Darwin delighted in his role as …
  • … from botanical research was provided by potatoes, as Darwin took up the cause of an Irish …
  • … would rid Ireland of famine. Several correspondents pressed Darwin for his views on religion, …
  • … closed with remarkable news of a large legacy bequeathed to Darwin by a stranger as a reward for his …
  • … birthday ( letter to Ernst Haeckel, 12 February [1878] ), Darwin reflected that it was ‘more …
  • … Expression ), and the final revision of Origin (1872), Darwin had turned almost exclusively to …
  • … Movement in plants In the spring of 1878, Darwin started to focus on the first shoots and …
  • … were enrolled as researchers, as were family members. Darwin asked his niece Sophy to observe …
  • … ( letter to Sophy Wedgwood, 24 March [1878–80] ). While Darwin was studying the function of …
  • … on one side, then another, to produce movement in the stalk. Darwin compared adult and young leaves …
  • … after growth has ceased or nearly ceased.’ Finally, Darwin turned to plant motion below the …
  • … precision the lines of least resistance in the ground.’ Darwin would devote a whole chapter to the …
  • … that he missed sensitiveness of apex’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, [11 May 1878] ). Having …
  • … moisture, and various chemical and nutritive substances, Darwin next considered sound. He explained …
  • … instrument to various plants. To confirm the results, Darwin borrowed a siren from Tyndall, who had …
  • … ill-luck to them, are not sensitive to aerial vibrations’, Darwin complained. ‘I am ashamed at my …
  • … 8 August. ‘Alas Frank is off tomorrow to Wurzburg,’ Darwin wrote to Thiselton-Dyer on 2 June , ‘ …
  • … Thiselton-Dyer, 18 June [1878] ). While Francis was away, Darwin sent regular reports about their …
  • … to, about my work, I scribble to you ( letter to Francis Darwin, 7 [July 1878] ). Two weeks later …
  • … not having you to discuss it with’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, 20 [July 1878] ). It is …
  • … had chlorophyll, Francis reported ( letter from Francis Darwin, [after 7 July 1878] ): ‘The oats …
  • … we must have’, Francis wrote ( letter from Francis Darwin, [before 17 July 1878] ), ‘a strong …
  • … me to jump to conclusions rather’ ( letter from Francis Darwin, [before 3 August 1878] ). One day …
  • … day & never the bedded out one’ ( letter from Francis Darwin, [after 7 July 1878] ). Sachs’s …
  • … Cieselski & read him,’ he reported ( letter from Francis Darwin, [22 June 1878] ). ‘Sachs …

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from 1875 on this website.  The full texts of the …
  • … 23 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge …
  • … Editions Plants always held an important place in Darwin’s theorising about species, and …
  • … his periods of severe illness. Yet on 15 January 1875 , Darwin confessed to his close friend …
  • … way to continuous writing and revision, activities that Darwin found less gratifying: ‘I am slaving …
  • … bad.’ The process was compounded by the fact that Darwin was also revising another manuscript …
  • … coloured stamens.’ At intervals during the year, Darwin was diverted from the onerous task of …
  • … zoologist St George Jackson Mivart. In April and early May, Darwin was occupied with a heated …
  • … chapter of the controversy involved a slanderous attack upon Darwin’s son George, in an anonymous …
  • … on 12 January , breaking off all future communication. Darwin had been supported during the affair …
  • … Society of London, and a secretary of the Linnean Society, Darwin’s friends had to find ways of …
  • … pp. 16–17). ‘How grandly you have defended me’, Darwin wrote on 6 January , ‘You have also …
  • … in public. ‘Without cutting him direct’, he advised Darwin on 7 January , ‘I should avoid him, …
  • … & again’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 January 1875 ). Darwin had also considered taking up …
  • … , ‘I feel now like a pure forgiving Christian!’ Darwin’s ire was not fully spent, however, …
  • … in the same Quarterly article that attacked George. Darwin raised the matter at the end of the …
  • … to rest, another controversy was brewing. In December 1874, Darwin had been asked to sign a memorial …
  • … Hensleigh and Frances Wedgwood. She had corresponded with Darwin about the evolution of the moral …
  • … could not sign the paper sent me by Miss Cobbe.’ Darwin found Cobbe’s memorial inflammatory …
  • … memorial had been read in the House of Lords (see ' Darwin and vivisection ').   …
  • … medical educators, and other interested parties. Darwin was summoned to testify on 3 November. It …
  • … ( Report of the Royal Commission on vivisection , p. 183). Darwin learned of Klein’s testimony …
  • … agree to any law, which should send him to the treadmill.’ Darwin had become acquainted with Klein …
  • … am astounded & disgusted at what you say about Klein,’ Darwin replied to Huxley on 1 November …
  • … the man.’   Poisons, plants, and print-runs Darwin’s keen interest in the progress of …
  • … leading physiologists. Indeed, some of the experiments that Darwin performed on plants, such as the …

Darwin in letters, 1877: Flowers and honours

Summary

Ever since the publication of Expression, Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The year 1877 was no exception. The spring and early summer were spent completing Forms of flowers, his fifth book on a botanical topic. He then turned to the…

Matches: 29 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1877 on this website.  The full texts …
  • … 25 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge …
  • … Ever since the publication of Expression , Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The …
  • … of these projects would culminate in a major publication. Darwin’s botany was increasingly a …
  • … assisted his father’s research on movement and bloom, and Darwin in turn encouraged his son’s own …
  • … The year 1877 was more than usually full of honours. Darwin received two elaborate photograph albums …
  • … from Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands. Closer to home, Darwin received an honorary Doctorate of …
  • … sites for possible earthworm activity. Now in his 69th year, Darwin remained remarkably productive, …
  • … no controversy. In his autobiographical reflections, Darwin remarked: ‘no little discovery of …
  • … (‘Recollections’, p. 419). During the winter and spring, Darwin was busy preparing the manuscript of …
  • … and presented to the Linnean Society of London. In the book, Darwin adopted the more recent term …
  • … as dimorphic without comparing pollen-grains & stigmas’, Darwin remarked to Joseph Dalton …
  • … measurements of the size and number of pollen-grains, Darwin compared the fertility of individual …
  • … primrose and purple loosestrife. In the course of his work, Darwin found a number of other …
  • … dreadful work making out anything about dried flowers’, Darwin complained to Asa Gray on 8 March …
  • … which include heterstyled species. This pleases me.’. Darwin dedicated the book to Gray, ‘as a small …
  • … separate publications together into a larger whole enabled Darwin to advance more speculative views …
  • … both pollen and seeds’ ( Forms of flowers , p. 344). Darwin was typically pessimistic about the …
  • … be sold’. His publisher knew from previous experience that Darwin was a poor judge of sales, and …
  • … after completing his manuscript of Forms of flowers , Darwin took up the problem of ‘bloom’ in …
  • … characteristic whose purpose was little understood. Darwin had begun studying bloom in August 1873, …
  • … exchanged between Down and Kew over the next six months. Darwin corresponded most often with the …
  • … been for your kindness, we sh d . have broken down’, Darwin wrote back on 5 September . ‘As it …
  • … injury from pure water resting on leaves’. In the end, Darwin did not publish on the subject, but …
  • … on leaves and the distribution of the stomata’ (F. Darwin 1886). Alongside his work on bloom, …
  • … closely to the leaves and required a tolerable shake’. Darwin gained another valuable observer in …
  • … T. Thiselton-Dyer, 25 August 1877 ). At Down House, Darwin and Francis devised a method of …
  • … the phenomenon in a Euphorbia (spurge) plant at Kew. Darwin then asked him to disturb the plant …
  • … card, and bits of glass. Encouraging Francis Darwin greatly enjoyed working with …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working …
  • … dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwin’s son George dominated the second …
  • … and traveller Alexander von Humboldt’s 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt …
  • … ). The death of a Cambridge friend, Albert Way, caused Darwin’s cousin, William Darwin Fox, to …
  • … from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one …
  • … I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a week’s visit to …
  • … Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that …
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in …
  • … 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and sceptics Darwin excused himself for reasons of …
  • … by George Henry Lewes and Marian Evans (George Eliot), but Darwin excused himself, finding it too …
  • … the month, another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwin’s cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those …
  • … imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin agreed that it was ‘all imposture’ …
  • … stop word getting to America of the ‘strange news’ that Darwin had allowed ‘a spirit séance’ at his …
  • … the first three months of the year and, like many of Darwin’s enterprises in the 1870s, were family …
  • … 21, letter to Smith, Elder & Co., 17 December [1873] ). Darwin himself had some trouble in …
  • … and letter to Charles Lyell, [13 January 1874] ). Darwin blamed his illness for the …
  • … . In his preface ( Coral reefs  2d ed., pp. v–vii), Darwin reasserted the priority of his work. …
  • … for the absence of coral-reefs in certain locations. Darwin countered with the facts that low …
  • … whole coastline of a large island. Dana also thought that Darwin had seen fringing reefs as proof of …
  • … presentation copy, Dana sent an apology for misinterpreting Darwin on this point ( letter from J. D …
  • … Alongside his revision of  Coral reefs,  Darwin went to work on a new edition of  Descent . In …
  • … George Cupples, a Scottish deerhound expert who forwarded Darwin’s queries about the numbers of …
  • … had raged between himself and Richard Owen since the 1860s. Darwin had omitted this controversial …
  • … elements of geology , and with the cheaper sixth edition of Darwin’s own  Origin . (The first …
  • … Murray’s partner, Robert Francis Cooke, informed Darwin that the lower price would bring the profits …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now …
  • … and also a meeting with Herbert Spencer, who was visiting Darwin’s neighbour, Sir John Lubbock. In …
  • … all but the concluding chapter of the work was submitted by Darwin to his publisher in December. …
  • … hypothesis of hereditary transmission. Debate about Darwin’s theory of transmutation …
  • … alleged evidence of a global ice age, while Asa Gray pressed Darwin’s American publisher for a …
  • … for the Advancement of Science. Fuller consideration of Darwin’s work was given by Hooker in an …
  • … frustrations were punctuated by family bereavement. Two of Darwin’s sisters died, Emily Catherine …
  • … from painful illness. Diet and exercise Among Darwin’s first letters in the new year …
  • … every day’ ( letter to H. B. Jones, 3 January [1866] ). Darwin had first consulted Jones in July …
  • … ( letter from H. B. Jones, 10 February [1866] ). Darwin began riding the cob, Tommy, on 4 …
  • … day which I enjoy much.’ The new exercise regime led to Darwin’s being teased by his neighbour, John …
  • … John Lubbock, 4 August 1866 ). More predictably, however, Darwin immediately converted his renewed …
  • … Since the publication of  Origin  in November 1859, Darwin had continued gathering and organising …
  • … by natural selection was based. The work relied heavily on Darwin’s extensive correspondence over …
  • … and poultry expert William Bernhard Tegetmeier. In January, Darwin wrote to Tegetmeier that he was …
  • … ( letter to W. B. Tegetmeier, 16 January [1866] ). Darwin found the evidence of variation in …
  • … varieties from  Columbia livia , the rock pigeon. Darwin on heredity: the 'provisional …
  • … chapter headed ‘Provisional hypothesis of pangenesis’, Darwin proposed that the various phenomena of …
  • … example, the reproductive organs, or the tissues of a bud. Darwin had submitted a preliminary sketch …
  • … & brimful of my dear little mysterious gemmules.’ Darwin collected information on …
  • … Thomas Rivers, and the German botanist Robert Caspary. Darwin was particularly interested in recent …
  • … the scion apparently produced buds with blended characters; Darwin had tried to propagate the …

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his …
  • … book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwin’s time for the rest of the year was devoted …
  • … way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from …
  • … offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be …
  • … a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate centred on Darwin’s evolutionary account of the …
  • … taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases …
  • … year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression. Darwin continued to investigate the …
  • … also brought a significant milestone for the family, as Darwin’s eldest daughter Henrietta was …
  • … during several past years, has been a great amusement’. Darwin had been working fairly continuously …
  • … work on species theory in the late 1830s. In recent years, Darwin had collected a wealth of material …
  • … to human evolution was comparatively small, reflecting Darwin’s aim of  showing kinship with animals …
  • … he is “torn to pieces” by people wanting copies’, Darwin wrote to his son Francis on 28 February …
  • … letter from J. D. Hooker, 26 March 1871 ). The profits for Darwin were considerable. After …
  • … man.’ Promoting the book As usual, Darwin did his best to obtain a wide and favourable …
  • … (see Correspondence vol. 19, Appendix IV). Four of Darwin’s five sons received a copy, and his …
  • … received a special acknowledgment in the form of a gift. Darwin credited her for whatever he had …
  • … ‘to keep in memory of the book’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 20 March 1871 ). Reaction …
  • … 1871). The geologist William Boyd Dawkins remarked on Darwin’s books’ reception amongst ‘artisans …
  • … 23 February 1871 ). Thomas Henry Huxley marvelled that Darwin had been able to link the periodicity …
  • … Variation ,  Descent  inspired many to write to Darwin with small corrections or contributions. …
  • … foetus ( letter from Hinrich Nitsche, 18 April 1871 ). Darwin thought he might use the photographs …
  • … friends A number of correspondents took issue with Darwin’s evolutionary explanation of the …
  • … butterflies and beetles to  Descent , could not extend Darwin’s evolutionary theory beyond man’s …
  • … disagreement regarding human ancestry was expressed by Darwin’s old friend, the former vicar of Down …
  • … the lesson taught by the black ants slaves to the white’. Darwin thanked Innes for his ‘pleasant …
  • … ). On religion and morality Others objected to Darwin’s theory on purely religious …

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 17 hits

  • … In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwin’s mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and …
  • … letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his …
  • … protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. Darwin’s transmutation theory continued to …
  • … Argyll, appeared in the religious weekly,  Good Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of …
  • … Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwin’s theory was discussed at an …
  • … in the  Gardeners’ Chronicle . At the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of …
  • … year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of …
  • … in August. There was also a serious dispute between two of Darwin’s friends, John Lubbock and …
  • … jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin was ready to submit his paper on …
  • … a sudden illness. Falconer was 56, almost the same age as Darwin himself. Falconer had seconded …
  • … supported his candidacy, and had tried hard to persuade Darwin to accept the award in person (see  …
  • … the award ( see letter from Hugh Falconer to Erasmus Alvey Darwin, 3 January 1865 ). Erasmus …
  • … Sic transit gloria mundi, with a vengeance Darwin’s response to the news of Falconer’s …
  • … at the time recovering from a bout of influenza, wrote to Darwin at some length about Falconer’s …
  • … ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865 ). Darwin, now ‘haunted’ by Hooker’s account of …
  • … 9 February [1865] ). Continuing ill-health Darwin had another cause for gloom: his …
  • … difference in my happiness’. At the end of April, Darwin’s condition worsened to the extent …

Darwin in letters,1870: Human evolution

Summary

The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the year at work on the Descent of Man & Selection in relation to Sex’.  Descent was the culmination of over three decades of observations and reflections on…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the …
  • … in relation to Sex’. Always precise in his accounting, Darwin reckoned that he had started writing …
  • … gathered on each of these topics was far more extensive than Darwin had anticipated. As a result,  …
  • … and St George Jackson Mivart, and heated debates sparked by Darwin’s proposed election to the French …
  • … Finishing Descent; postponing Expression Darwin began receiving proofs of some of the …
  • … ( letter to Albert Günther, 13 January [1870] ). Darwin was still working hard on parts of the …
  • … style, the more grateful I shall be’  ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). She had …
  • … , the latter when she was just eighteen years of age. Darwin clearly expected her to make a …
  • … have thought that I shd. turn parson?’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). Henrietta …
  • … so unimportant as the mind of man!’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [after 8 February 1870] ). …
  • … philanthropist Frances Power Cobbe. At Cobbe’s suggestion, Darwin read some of Immanuel Kant’s  …
  • … ( letter to F. P. Cobbe, 23 March [1870?] ). Cobbe accused Darwin of smiling in his beard with …
  • … as animals: ears Despite Cobbe’s plea, most of Darwin’s scientific attention in 1870 was …
  • … fairy in Shakespeare’s  A midsummer night’s dream.  Darwin obtained a sketch of a human ear from …
  • … of a pointed tip projecting inward from the folded margin. Darwin, who had posed for the sculptor in …
  • … this volume, letter to Thomas Woolner, 10 March [1870] ). Darwin included Woolner’s sketch in  …
  • … muscles A more troubling anatomical feature for Darwin was the platysma myoides, a band of …
  • … of fright’, and one of his photographs, later used by Darwin in  Expression , showed a man whose …
  • … letter from James Crichton-Browne, 15 March 1870 ). Indeed, Darwin noted the same longitudinal …
  • … Researching expression: questions and questionnaires Darwin’s research on emotions continued …
  • … of the source of the Niger river. Reade was sceptical of Darwin’s view that standards of beauty were …
  • … evidence of the continuity of expressions across species, Darwin asked the zoo-keeper at Regent’s …
  • … much?’ ( letter to A. D. Bartlett, 5 January [1870] ). Darwin made a similar request of a London …

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July …
  • … … of having grown older’. This portrait, the first of Darwin with his now famous beard, had been …
  • … 52 hours without vomiting!! In the same month, Darwin began to consult William Jenner, …
  • … prescribed a variety of antacids and purgatives, and limited Darwin’s fluid intake; this treatment …
  • … the dimorphic aquatic cut-grass  Leersia . In May, Darwin finished his paper on  Lythrum …
  • … he had set aside the previous summer. In October, Darwin let his friends know that on his …
  • … to the surgeon and naturalist Francis Trevelyan Buckland, Darwin described his symptoms in some …
  • … November and December were also marked by the award to Darwin of the Royal Society’s Copley Medal; …
  • … been unsuccessfully nominated the two previous years. As Darwin explained to his cousin William …
  • … it was conferred, brought a dramatic conclusion to the year. Darwin also wrote to Fox that he was …
  • … progress’ in Britain. Challenging convention Darwin’s concern about the acceptance of …
  • …  vol. 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] , Darwin wrote to Hooker: ‘The only approach to work …
  • …  produce tendrils However, the queries that Darwin, describing himself as ‘a broken-down …
  • … tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). Darwin’s excitement about his …
  • … ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 June [1864] ). When Darwin asked Oliver whether the tendrils of …
  • … for his teacherly tone, explaining that he had felt that Darwin had misunderstood some accepted …
  • … ( letter from Daniel Oliver, [17 March 1864] ). Though Darwin replied with his typical humility …
  • … habits of climbing plants’ (‘Climbing plants’), which Darwin submitted to the Linnean Society in …
  • … was often the case, he was interested in transitional forms. Darwin came to think, for example, that …
  • … and tendril-bearers. At the end of his paper, Darwin used species from the genus  Lathyrus …
  • … the tendrils then revert to leaves, as in  L. nissolia . Darwin wrote (‘Climbing plants’, p. 115): …
  • … In addition to his work on climbing plants, Darwin engaged in 1864 in botanical observations and …
  • … between species and varieties, and the nature of hybridity. Darwin noticed that the sterility …
  • … and differentiated over a long period of time. Darwin remarked on the similar role of sexual …
  • … the results (see Correspondence vol. 12, Appendix III). Darwin sought to show that the existence …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate…

Matches: 25 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If any …
  • … he ought to do what I am doing pester them with letters.’ Darwin was certainly true to his word. The …
  • … and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 87–90, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of …
  • … process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual selection was ‘the …
  • … 12, letter to A. R. Wallace, 28 [May 1864] ). Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as …
  • … to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on …
  • … his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that his …
  • … which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for …
  • … in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing gave Darwin much vexation. ‘My book is …
  • … 1867 and had expected to complete it in a fortnight. But at Darwin’s request, he modified his …
  • … the text. This increased the amount of work substantially. Darwin asked Murray to intervene, …
  • … … though it would be a great loss to the Book’. But Darwin’s angry letter to Murray crossed one from …
  • … blank’ ( letter from W. S. Dallas, 8 January 1868 ). Darwin sympathised, replying on 14 January …
  • … as stone, if it were not quite mollified by your note’. Darwin enclosed a cheque to Dallas for £55  …
  • … and descent in the  Fortnightly Review , and asked Darwin for comments. Darwin was clearly …
  • … ‘fast passing away’ that sparked the most discussion. Darwin wrote to Hooker on 23 February , …
  • … authorship. John Murray thought it was by Gray himself, but Darwin corrected him: ‘D r  Gray would …
  • … of Science, Robertson published a rejoinder, arousing Darwin’s ire still further: ‘he is a scamp …
  • … all sorts of subjects In writing  Variation , Darwin had been careful to acknowledge …
  • … great influx of unsolicited letters from persons unknown to Darwin, offering additional facts that …
  • … 1868 . The letter was addressed to ‘the Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently assumed Darwin
  • … in the world’ (from ?, 6 April 1868). On 21 May , Darwin complained to Hooker, ‘I am bothered …
  • … an outpouring of details and untoward examples even from Darwin’s inner circle of expert naturalists …
  • … by flexing. On 5 April , Edward Blyth, who had supplied Darwin with a wealth of information on …
  • … the opportunities provided by  Variation  for expanding Darwin’s network of informers proved very …

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 28 hits

  • … evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost …
  • … (1875) and  Cross and self fertilisation  (1876). Darwin’s son Francis became increasingly …
  • … career to become his father’s scientific secretary. Darwin had always relied on assistance from …
  • … Francis’s decision. A large portion of the letters Darwin received in 1873 were in response …
  • … the previous year. As was typical, readers wrote to Darwin personally to offer suggestions, …
  • … some of which were incorporated in a later edition. Darwin also contributed to discussions in the …
  • … Francis Galton’s work on inherited talent, which prompted Darwin to reflect on the traits and …
  • … Station at Naples. Plants that eat and feel? Darwin had resumed experiments on the …
  • … 12 January [1873] ).  Drosera  was the main focus of Darwin’s study of insectivorous plants, a …
  • … and alkaloids, and even electrical stimulation. On sending Darwin a specimen of the carnivorous  …
  • … ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 12 January 1873 ). Darwin found that the glandular hairs on the …
  • … to bend inward, so that the plant closed like a fist. Darwin was fascinated by this transmission of …
  • … plants , p. 63). The plants secreted a viscid fluid, which Darwin suspected attracted insects by …
  • … ., p. 17). Through a series of painstaking experiments, Darwin determined that the secretions …
  • … botanist Mary Treat, who performed experiments suggested by Darwin on the North American species  …
  • … . He began to perform experiments modelled on those of Darwin, feeding the plant egg and raw meat, …
  • … guide to animal experimentation that Klein had co-authored. Darwin contacted two of the  Handbook …
  • … London, and director of the Brown Institution.  Darwin sent an abstract of his preliminary …
  • … muscle and nerve tissue of animals. Burdon Sanderson visited Darwin at Down in July and was drawn …
  • … To test whether the plants had a nerve-like structure, Darwin suggested electrical experiments on  …
  • … coil. He was so impressed by the results that he sent Darwin the news by telegraph in September, and …
  • … the Advancement of Science later that month. Finally, Darwin enlisted the chemist Edward …
  • … enzyme. Cross- and self-fertilisation Darwin’s other main focus of botanical …
  • … work that had been going on for many years. Darwin resumed these studies in February. He received …
  • … ( letter to T. H. Farrer, 14 August 1873 ). Darwin worried, however, that his own …
  • … in May to request permission to translate it into German. Darwin was vexed, and begged his publisher …
  • … 4 May [1873] ). Keeping it in the family As Darwin worked exclusively on botany, he …
  • … and take tracings of their burrows” ( letter from Francis Darwin, 14 August [1873] ). In …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of …
  • … markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters …
  • … am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical …
  • … letter-writing dwindled considerably. The correspondence and Darwin’s scientific work diminished …
  • … of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • … the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwin’s preoccupation with the …
  • … to man’s place in nature  both had a direct bearing on Darwin’s species theory and on the problem …
  • … detailed anatomical similarities between humans and apes, Darwin was full of praise. He especially …
  • … in expressing any judgment on Species or origin of man’. Darwin’s concern about the popular …
  • … Lyell’s and Huxley’s books. Three years earlier Darwin had predicted that Lyell’s forthcoming …
  • … first half of 1863 focused attention even more closely on Darwin’s arguments for species change. …
  • … ‘groan’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Darwin reiterated in a later letter that it …
  • … of creation, and the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once …
  • … letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] ). Darwin did not relish telling Lyell of his …
  • … ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Nevertheless, Darwin’s regret was profound that the …
  • … the ‘brutes’, but added that he would bring many towards Darwin who would have rebelled against …
  • … from Charles Lyell, 11 March 1863 ). The botanist Asa Gray, Darwin’s friend in the United States, …
  • … off ( see letter from Asa Gray, 20 April 1863 ). In May, Darwin responded to Gray that Lyell’s and …
  • … or   Modification, ’. Faction fighting Darwin was not alone in feeling disaffected …
  • … in the subject. ‘The worst of it is’, Hooker wrote to Darwin, ‘I suppose it is virtually Huxley’s …
  • … that he had contributed to the proofs of human antiquity. Darwin and Hooker repeatedly exchanged …
  • … appeared in the  Natural History Review  in January, Darwin, who was already ill-disposed towards …
  • … January [1863] ). Archaeopteryx Falconer, Darwin, and others found an additional …
  • … of Owen’s ‘slip-shod and hasty account’ of the find, Darwin asked, ‘Has God demented Owen, as a …
  • … observed that the fossil was ‘a strange being à la Darwin’, a transitional form between reptiles and …

Darwin in letters, 1867: A civilised dispute

Summary

Charles Darwin’s major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work, The variation of animals and plants under domestication (Variation). The importance of Darwin’s network of correspondents becomes vividly apparent in his work on expression in…

Matches: 25 hits

  • …   Charles Darwin’s major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work,  …
  • … couple of months were needed to index the work, a task that Darwin handed over to someone else for …
  • … and animals  ( Expression ), published in 1872. Although Darwin had been collecting material and …
  • … A global reputation The importance of Darwin’s network of correspondents becomes vividly …
  • … who might best answer the questions, with the result that Darwin began to receive replies from …
  • … Variation  would be based on proof-sheets received as Darwin corrected them. Closer to home, two …
  • … Charles Fleeming Jenkin, challenged different aspects of Darwin’s theory of transmutation as …
  • … orchids are fertilised by insects  ( Orchids ). While Darwin privately gave detailed opinions of …
  • … capable hands of Alfred Russel Wallace. At the same time, Darwin was persuaded by some German …
  • … were becoming counterproductive. Throughout the year, Darwin continued to discuss now …
  • … in Germany, and Federico Delpino in Italy, who provided Darwin with the collegial support and …
  • … tedious dull work’ Thomas Henry Huxley sent Darwin the New Year’s greeting, ‘may you be …
  • … number of copies to be printed, and by the end of the month Darwin promised to send the revised …
  • … to John Murray, 31 January [1867] ). A week later, Darwin had sent the manuscript to the …
  • … Descent  and  Expression . In the same letter, Darwin revealed the conclusion to his newly …
  • … As the year progressed, the book continued to consume Darwin’s time. The first proof-sheets arrived …
  • … Russian, German, and French translations had been arranged. Darwin had now found sympathetic …
  • … was made by a young naturalist equally devoted to Darwin’s work, Vladimir Onufrievich Kovalevsky. …
  • … brother’s embryological papers with his first letter to Darwin of 15 March 1867 , although he …
  • … concerned with finding a good translator for his book, Darwin was always on the lookout for evidence …
  • … link between invertebrates and vertebrates. Finally, Darwin had made sure that Julius Victor …
  • … he was certain that Carus would undertake the translation. Darwin had received other offers, notably …
  • … already agreed in principle to translate the work but told Darwin, ‘I am so very much occupied just …
  • … V. Carus, 5 April 1867 ). This hint of uncertainty caused Darwin to respond to Vogt somewhat …
  • … task’ ( letter to Carl Vogt, 12 April [1867] ). Darwin need not have worried. Carus soon …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  …
  • … appeared at the end of 1866 and had told his cousin William Darwin Fox, ‘My work will have to stop a …
  • … material on emotional expression. Yet the scope of Darwin’s interests remained extremely broad, and …
  • … plants, and earthworms, subjects that had exercised Darwin for decades, and that would continue to …
  • … Carl von  Nägeli and perfectibility Darwin’s most substantial addition to  Origin  was a …
  • … a Swiss botanist and professor at Munich (Nägeli 1865). Darwin had considered Nägeli’s paper …
  • … principal engine of change in the development of species. Darwin correctly assessed Nägeli’s theory …
  • … in most morphological features (Nägeli 1865, p. 29). Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now …
  • … are & must be morphological’. The comment highlights Darwin’s apparent confusion about Nägeli’s …
  • … ‘purely morphological’. The modern reader may well share Darwin’s uncertainty, but Nägeli evidently …
  • … pp. 28–9). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical examples he could use …
  • … problems of heredity Another important criticism that Darwin sought to address in the fifth …
  • … prevailing theory of blending inheritance that Jenkin and Darwin both shared, would tend to be lost …
  • … ( Origin  5th ed., pp. 103–4). The terminology that Darwin and others employed in these matters ( …
  • … ‘I must have expressed myself atrociously’, Darwin wrote to Alfred Russel Wallace on 2 February , …
  • … of  Origin  was the result of correspondence between Darwin and the geologist James Croll. In the …
  • … but it was his theory of alternate ice ages that piqued Darwin’s interest the most. He wrote, ‘this …
  • … ( letter to James Croll, 31 January [1869] ). Darwin had argued ( Origin , pp. 377–8) that plant …
  • … would always exist. In  Origin  5th ed., pp. 450–61, Darwin accounted for the survival of tropical …
  • … James Croll,  31 January [1869] ). Croll could not supply Darwin with an estimate of the age of the …
  • … ( letter from James Croll, 4 February 1869 ).  Darwin did not directly challenge Thomson’s …
  • … 19 March [1869] ). Towards Descent Once Darwin had completed revisions of the …
  • … and overseas. The dog-breeder George Cupples worked hard on Darwin’s behalf, sending a steady stream …
  • … sexes in sheep, cattle, horses, and dogs, and circulating Darwin’s queries to various contacts. As …
  • … causing difficulties. The entomologist Frederick Smith, whom Darwin had asked to study the musical …
  • … butterflies, supplementing that received the previous year. Darwin also continued to receive …

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 30 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little …
  • … of   On the origin of   species , intended to be Darwin’s last, and of  Expression of the …
  • … books brought a strong if deceptive sense of a job now done: Darwin intended, he declared to Alfred …
  • …  27 July [1872] ). By the end of the year Darwin was immersed in two of the studies that …
  • … of books and papers, and the latter formed the subject of Darwin’s last book,  The formation of   …
  • … worms , published in the year before his death.  Despite Darwin’s declared intention to take up new …
  • … begun many years before. In his private life also, Darwin was in a nostalgic frame of mind, …
  • … The last word on Origin The year opened with Darwin, helped by his eldest son William, …
  • … on 30 January , shortly after correcting the proofs, and Darwin’s concern for the consolidation of …
  • … and sixth editions were costly to incorporate, and despite Darwin’s best efforts, set the final …
  • … closely involved in every stage of publication of his books, Darwin was keen to ensure that this …
  • … to bring out the new edition in the United States, Darwin arranged with Murray to have it …
  • … had to be reset.  The investment in stereotype reinforced Darwin’s intention to make no further …
  • … A worsening breach The criticisms against which Darwin had taken the greatest trouble to …
  • … objections to the theory of natural selection’, Darwin refuted point by point assertions published …
  • … Although Mivart was among those who wrote in January to wish Darwin a happy new year, before the …
  • … critical and anonymously published review of  Descent . Darwin’s supporters had rallied to his …
  • … The republication of Wright’s paper had been arranged by Darwin himself (see  Correspondence  vol. …
  • … so bigotted a person as I am made to appear’, complained Darwin ( letter to St G. J. Mivart, 5 …
  • … that he would willingly acknowledge himself at fault if only Darwin would renounce `fundamental …
  • … letter to St G. J. Mivart, 8 January [1872] ).  Despite Darwin’s request that he drop the …
  • … ( letter from St G. J. Mivart,  10 January 1872 ).  Darwin, determined to have the last word in …
  • … 11 January [1872] ). 'I hate controversy,’ Darwin wrote later in the year, possibly with this …
  • … ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 3 August [1872] ).  Darwin's theories under siege …
  • … sexual selection in human evolution, continued to trouble Darwin.  ‘At present natural selection is …
  • … about the level of support for his theories abroad and Darwin, directing operations from the safe …
  • … 13 December 1872 ).  'Here is a bee' Darwin discussed the reception of his …
  • … selection to bees (H. Müller 1872), and with his reply Darwin enclosed an account of research he had …
  • … By the time  Origin  was published in February, Darwin was in London, making the first of several …
  • … he found a mixed blessing: ‘I hope my Brain likes it,’ Darwin wrote about one of these holidays; ‘as …

Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 28 hits

  • … indicates, 1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his …
  • … promotion of his theory of natural selection also continued: Darwin’s own works expanded on it, …
  • … a keen interest in the progress of his views through Europe, Darwin negotiated, in addition to a …
  • … the family over the summer. But towards the end of the year, Darwin was able once more to turn his …
  • … of the Scottish press hissed). Huxley, while advocating Darwin’s theory, had again espoused the view …
  • … experimental production of new ‘physiological’ species. Darwin attempted to dissuade him from this …
  • … delivered a series of lectures to working men that reviewed Darwin’s theory, and sent copies to …
  • … about the vars. of Tobacco.' At the end of the year, Darwin seemed resigned to their …
  • … common man This correspondence with Huxley made Darwin keener than ever to repeat the …
  • … began writing long, intelligent, and informative letters, Darwin, impressed, gave him the commission …
  • … ). Two sexual forms: Primula and Linum Darwin’s views on the phenomenon of …
  • … when crossed with another plant of the reciprocal form. Darwin concluded that the two forms existed …
  • … in  Primula ’, p. 92 ( Collected papers  2: 59)). Darwin later recalled: ‘no little discovery of …
  • … , p. 134). On completion of his  Primula  paper, Darwin repeated his crosses through a …
  • … George Bentham at Kew were also tapped for their knowledge. Darwin, initially hopeful, became …
  • … one by one 6700 seeds of Monochætum!!’ By October, Darwin was flagging and declared to Gray: ‘I am …
  • … is something very curious to be made out about them.’ Darwin persisted with his experiments through …
  • … proved more profitable subjects for investigation, and Darwin was soon filling portfolios with notes …
  • … to M. T. Masters, 24 July [1862] ). The materials that Darwin amassed on heterostyly in this year …
  • … experiments led directly to publication. Many years earlier, Darwin had observed dimorphism in  …
  • … One of the multi-volume treatises through which Darwin groaningly trawled seeking cases of …
  • … Lythrum , the purple loosestrife. By the summer, Darwin was experimenting. ‘To day I have been …
  • … forms produced fertile seed. The case clearly excited Darwin, who exclaimed to Gray ( letter to Asa …
  • … evidence with which to sway Huxley. By October, Darwin had decided that the case warranted a …
  • … own specimens of the orchid  Catasetum tridentatum ,that Darwin described before the ‘placid …
  • … that were believed to constitute three distinct genera. Darwin explained that the three flowers …
  • … since the previous summer. Orchids Darwin had enjoyed observing the orchids: he …
  • … son, William, his language was more blunt ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 14 February [1862] ): ‘whether …

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 28 hits

  • … The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle  voyage was one …
  • … a family Busy as he was with scientific activities, Darwin found time to re-establish family …
  • … close contact. In November 1838, two years after his return, Darwin became engaged to his cousin, …
  • … daughter, Anne Elizabeth, moved to Down House in Kent, where Darwin was to spend the rest of his …
  • … his greatest theoretical achievement, the most important of Darwin’s activities during the years …
  • … identifications of his bird and fossil mammal specimens, Darwin arrived at the daring and momentous …
  • … in species. With this new theoretical point of departure Darwin continued to make notes and explore …
  • … present in the version of 1859. Young author Darwin’s investigation of the species …
  • … the  Beagle  had returned to England, news of some of Darwin’s findings had been spread by the …
  • … great excitement. The fuller account of the voyage and Darwin’s discoveries was therefore eagerly …
  • … suitable categories for individual experts to work upon, Darwin applied himself to the revision of …
  • … of the surveying voyage of H.M.S. Adventure and Beagle. Darwin’s volume bore the title  Journal …
  • … visited by H.M.S. Beagle .  Also in November 1837, Darwin read the fourth of a series of papers to …
  • … to the Society of 9 March 1838), had been developed by Darwin from a suggestion made by his uncle, …
  • … Sedgwick, [after 15 May 1838] ). The new research Darwin undertook after 1837 was an …
  • … time, the parallel terraces, or ‘roads’, of Glen Roy. Darwin had seen similar formations on the …
  • … roads of Glen Roy’,  Collected papers  1: 88–137). Darwin later abandoned this view, calling it a …
  • … contemporaneous unstratified deposits of South America”, Darwin continued to defend his and Lyell’s …
  • … 1842, having heard of evidence of glaciation in North Wales, Darwin made a tour there in order to …
  • … more satisfactorily than any alternative explanation. Darwin eventually relinquished this theory and …
  • … the Beagle voyage In addition to his work on geology Darwin undertook to provide a …
  • … The correspondence provides a nearly complete record of Darwin’s arrangements with the Treasury, his …
  • … , by Thomas Bell—a total of nineteen quarto issues. Darwin contributed a substantial portion of the …
  • … and habitats of the species. Mr Arthrobalanus Darwin had originally planned to include …
  • … Archipelago off the coast of Chile. These unexpectedly led Darwin to devote eight years (1846–54) …
  • … As the correspondence from these years shows, that work put Darwin in communication with most of the …
  • … and corals by William Lonsdale ( Collected papers , 2). Darwin’s crustacean specimens, originally …
  • … Only the plants were neglected. During the voyage Darwin had expected that J. S. Henslow would …

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … results of the  Beagle  voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but throughout these …
  • … species and varieties. In contrast to the received image of Darwin as a recluse in Down, the letters …
  • … Down House was altered and extended to accommodate Darwin’s growing family and the many relatives …
  • … The geological publications In these years, Darwin published two books on geology,  Volcanic …
  • … papers for all these organisations. Between 1844 and 1846 Darwin himself wrote ten papers, six of …
  • … 2, letter to A. Y. Spearman, 9 October 1843, n. 1). Darwin's inner circle: first …
  • … not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable Darwin’s earlier scientific friendships …
  • … friends, with the addition of Hooker, were important to Darwin for—among other things—they were the …
  • … scientific issues that arose out of his work on species. Darwin discussed his ideas on species …
  • … Only two months after their first exchange, early in 1844, Darwin told Hooker that he was engaged in …
  • … correspondence that his close friends were not outraged by Darwin’s heterodox opinions and later in …
  • … But although eager for the views of informed colleagues, Darwin was naturally protective of his …
  • …  vol. 4, letter to J. D. Hooker, 8 [February 1847]). Darwin can be seen as a cautious strategist, …
  • … candidate, known to be working on species and varieties, was Darwin himself: as he told his cousin …
  • … the book to him. But, as his letters to Hooker show, Darwin carefully considered and then rejected …
  • … Perhaps the most interesting letter relating to Darwin’s species theory, which also bears on his …
  • … to his wife Emma, dated 5 July 1844 , just after Darwin had completed the final draft of his …
  • … who would undertake to see the work through the press. Darwin also listed possible editors: at first …
  • … on the work. But the list was subsequently altered after Darwin’s second, and possibly third, …
  • … Hooker’s was added. Much later, by the autumn of 1854 when Darwin began sorting out his notes in …
  • … the cover to that effect. The full consideration that Darwin gave to the future editing and …
  • … he was for much of the time too ill even to write letters, Darwin felt that his life was only too …
  • … in his health. Volcanoes, rocks, and fossils Darwin’s published work during this …
  • … elevation of extensive tracts of land relative to the sea. Darwin put forward a new explanation of …
  • … whose subsequent work led to the general acceptance of Darwin’s views.  South America  drew …
  • … structure of the land could best be explained by elevation. Darwin presented a wholeheartedly …

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence …
  • … Russel Wallace. This letter led to the first announcement of Darwin’s and Wallace’s respective …
  • … the composition and publication, in November 1859, of Darwin’s major treatise  On the origin of …
  • …  exceeded my wildest hopes By the end of 1859, Darwin’s work was being discussed in …
  • … Charles Lyell, 25 [November 1859] ). This transformation in Darwin’s personal world and the …
  • … The 'big book' The year 1858 opened with Darwin hard at work preparing his ‘big …
  • … his ninth chapter, on hybridism, on 29 December 1857, Darwin began in January 1858 to prepare the …
  • … appropriate. The correspondence shows that at any one time Darwin was engaged in a number of …
  • … The chapter on instinct posed a number of problems for Darwin. ‘I find my chapter on Instinct very …
  • … ). In addition to behaviour such as nest-building in birds, Darwin intended to discuss many other …
  • … celebrated as a classic example of divine design in nature. Darwin hypothesised that the instinct of …
  • … of construction as it took place in the hive. As with Darwin’s study of poultry and pigeons, …
  • … founder and president of the Apiarian Society, provided Darwin with information and specimens. His …
  • … For assistance with mathematical measurements and geometry, Darwin called upon William Hallowes …
  • … from the  Beagle voyage; on his brother, Erasmus Alvey Darwin; and his son William. Even his …
  • … bees and bee-hives. Variation and reversion Darwin also continued the botanical work …
  • … of smaller genera? The inquiry was of great importance to Darwin, for such evidence would support …
  • … of the statistics was still problematic. Hooker thought that Darwin was wrong to assume that …
  • … were not certain. This was a question new to the experts. Darwin was delighted to hear from Asa Gray …
  • … completed and his results written up. With some trepidation, Darwin sent his manuscript off to …
  • … in the letters of 1858 also relate to questions that Darwin had begun to explore earlier. Letters to …
  • … rush to publish With much of his research completed, Darwin began in mid-June 1858 to write …
  • … Wallace enunciated his own theory of natural selection. Darwin’s shock and dismay is evident in the …
  • … Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). As was his custom, Darwin did not supply a full date on his …
  • … as having been received ‘today’. Following Francis Darwin ( LL 2: 116–17) and relying on Charles …
  • … dated the letter 18 [June 1858]. However, the accuracy of Darwin’s words has been questioned by John …
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