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All Darwin's letters from 1873 go online for the anniversary of Origin

Summary

To celebrate the 158th anniversary of the publication of Origin of species on 24 November, the full transcripts and footnotes of over 500 letters from and to Charles Darwin in 1873 are now available online. Read about Darwin's life in 1873 through his…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … and footnotes of over 500 letters from and to Charles Darwin in 1873 are now available online. …
  • … father or an atheist. Here are some highlights from Darwin's correspondence in 1873: …
  • … to J. D. Hooker, 23 October [1873] ) In 1873, Darwin continued work on insectivorous …
  • … , published in 1875. Investigating the sundew's sensitivity, Darwin found that the glandular …
  • … to bend inward, so that the plant closed like a fist. Darwin was fascinated by this transmission of …
  • … 2 scientific secretaries work to do  ( Letter to E. A. Darwin, 20 September 1873 ) As …
  • … proposed that he give up his medical career and become Darwin's secretary. This was a useful …
  • … appeared anonymously in the Edinburgh Review in April. Darwin asked one of his Scottish …
  • … to T. H. Huxley, 23 April 1873 ) Darwin wrote this to Thomas Henry Huxley, in the hope …
  • … poor health, and in financial trouble because of a law suit. Darwin, though not in the best of …
  • … Letter to Francis Galton, 28 May 1873 ) Darwin was invited to reflect on his own …
  • … As well as mentioning the traits listed above, Darwin revealingly declared, 'Special talents, …

Origin

Summary

Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of his wish to establish priority for the species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856…

Matches: 23 hits

  • Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew …
  • … species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, …
  • … of the first public presentation of documents relating to Darwin’s species theory together with …
  • … Down for a few weeks to the Isle of Wight. Although Darwin and Wallace’s papers were …
  • … . In reply, Hooker provided reassurance by suggesting that Darwin might be able to have 100 to 150 …
  • … the big book on large and small genera, and was able to tell Darwin ‘ you overrate the extent of my …
  • … than I now do. ’  Even with this endorsement, Darwin’s spirits remained low. ‘ We are too …
  • … on 18 July. Just two days later, he told his cousin William Darwin Fox ‘ After all, I am now …
  • … because Fox had been instrumental in persuading Darwin not to publish an abstract in 1856 , …
  • … & I shall have separate copies & will send you one . Darwin’s weariness in …
  • … the Isle of Wight, and having started work on his abstract, Darwin was in an altogether more …
  • … continued in August, while he was still away from Down. Darwin knew that these puzzles had to be …
  • … to hear your objections to my species speculations’, Darwin wrote to Henslow, ‘ The difficulties …
  • … full abstract of all my notions on this subject. ’ Darwin evidently continued to fret about the …
  • … published. ’ It was clear that the big book remained Darwin’s focus of attention for the full …
  • … skeletonising them and completing his ‘Pigeon M.S.’ ( Darwin's Journal ) ‘At last, thank God, …
  • … him to take any of the pure birds that were left. Although Darwin looked forward to the visit and …
  • … of talking for long ’. Despite his poor health, Darwin recommenced working on his abstract, telling …
  • … me weigh relative importance of the several elements. ’ Darwin continued to write until the end of …
  • … ’. By this point he had drafted six sections.  As Darwin completed his chapters, he actively …
  • … the flora of Australia in December 1858, he asked to borrow Darwin’s ‘ Chapter on transmigration of …
  • … in 1859, it was one of the first publications to draw on Darwin’s theory .   Darwin must have …
  • … with the joint publication of his species theory with Darwin’s by the Linnean Society. ‘I never felt …

Movement in Plants

Summary

The power of movement in plants, published on 7 November 1880, was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which the assistance of one of his children, Francis Darwin, is mentioned on the title page. The research for this…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … 7 November 1880, was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which …
  • … about their research while he was away from home. Although Darwin lacked a state of the art research …
  • … the advantages of both while Francis was working abroad. Darwin was privy to the inner workings of …
  • … methods and use the most advanced laboratory equipment. Darwin also benefitted from the instrument …
  • … that Francis had been introduced to at Würzburg. Darwin described his experimental practice …
  • … plant physiology, but it was at its core informed by Darwin’s theory of evolution, particularly by …
  • … early 1860s, at a time when his health was especially bad, Darwin had taken up the study of climbing …
  • … reproduced as a small book, giving it a much wider audience. Darwin was not the first naturalist to …
  • … which eventually appeared in 1875. In the same year, Darwin published a much longer work,  …
  • … about the nature of movement, so much so, that at one point Darwin had considered combining the …
  • … digestive processes. With his final great botanical work, Darwin would attempt ‘ to bring all the …
  • … emotions had their origins in non-human animal expression. Darwin had not done experimental work in …
  • … viewed the division between animals and plants as absolute, Darwin was interested in similarities. …
  • … become adapted to perform new functions, like climbing? For Darwin, physiology was a way of seeing …
  • … attracting students from all over Europe and beyond. When Darwin’s son Francis worked in this …
  • …   ‘Mad about drops of water’ Darwin’s interest in the diversified movements of …
  • … connection is revealed only though correspondence because Darwin never published on bloom. In August …
  • … focusing light rays, and burn sections of the leaf blade. Darwin asked whether Farrer’s gardener had …
  • … sun. It is a splendid subject for experiments ’.  Darwin was clearly intrigued by bloom, but …
  • … to discuss the point with his friend Francis Balfour(258). Darwin promised to reflect on Balfour’s …
  • … Given that the function of bloom appeared to be protective, Darwin began to consider what other …
  • … as a protection against rain lodging on the leaves ’. Darwin then studied an even more interesting …
  • … syringing we could give them elicited movement ’. Darwin, however, had to finish his work on …
  • … to my heart ’. It would be another three years before Darwin would resume work on movement and …
  • … am very doubtful of any success. '. Just two months later, Darwin put Francis in charge of …
  • … Movement in plants , p. 300. Darwin now began to study so-called sleep in plants (the change …

Calendars to the correspondence of Charles Darwin

Summary

In 1985, the Darwin Correspondence Project produced its first publication, A Calendar to the Correspondence of Charles Darwin: 1821–1882 (New York: Garland), which contained a detailed summary of every letter Darwin was then known to have sent or received.…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … In 1985, the Darwin Correspondence Project produced its first publication,  A Calendar to the …
  • … Calendar  is still a standard reference work for Darwin scholars. In 1996 a separate …
  • … into the process of collecting and organising the wealth of Darwin correspondence.    …

Darwin and women: a selection of letters

Summary

A shorter version of this film is available on the Cambridge University Press video stream.   Darwin and Women focusses on Darwin's correspondence with women and on the lives of the women he knew and wrote to. It includes a large number of…

Matches: 5 hits

  • … University Press video stream .   Darwin and Women focusses on Darwin's …
  • … number of hitherto unpublished letters between members of Darwin's family and their friends …
  • … and their relationships, social and professional, with Darwin. The letters included are by turns …
  • … servants, that set them in an accessible narrative context. Darwin's famous remarks on women& …
  • … the book's editor, Samantha Evans, in her blogs on ' Emma Darwin and women's higher …

Abstract of Darwin’s theory

Summary

There are two extant versions of the abstract of Darwin’s theory of natural selection. One was sent to Asa Gray on 5 September 1857, enclosed with a letter of the same date (see Correspondence vol. 6, letter to Asa Gray, 5 September [1857] and enclosure).…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … There are two extant versions of the abstract of Darwin’s theory of natural selection. One was sent …
  • … and enclosure). It is in the hand of Ebenezer Norman, Darwin’s copyist and includes minor …
  • … which the fair copy for Gray was made. It was retained by Darwin (DAR 6). This version was …
  • … it has been transcribed here. The transcript does not record Darwin’s corrections and alterations …
  • … printed version is headed: “Abstract of a Letter from C. Darwin, Esq., to Prof. Asa Gray, Boston, U …
  • … 2 The printed version reads: ‘astounded’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 50). 3 The printed …
  • … and even in some degree methodically, followed’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 50). 4 The …
  • … reads: ‘good for carpets, of another for cloth, &c.’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 10 …
  • … not judge by mere external appearances, but who could’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 11 …
  • … reads: ‘and should go on selecting for one object’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 13 The …
  • … reads: ‘in a few years, or at most a few centuries’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 17 At …
  • … of the earth would not hold the progeny of one pair’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 51). 18 The …
  • … 20 The printed version reads: ‘far more’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 52). 21 The printed …
  • … follow to obtain food by struggling with other organisms’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 52). …
  • … natural selection to any profitable extent. The variety’ (Darwin and Wallace 1858, p. 52). 25 …

Darwin in letters, 1847-1850: Microscopes and barnacles

Summary

Darwin's study of barnacles, begun in 1844, took him eight years to complete. The correspondence reveals how his interest in a species found during the Beagle voyage developed into an investigation of the comparative anatomy of other cirripedes and…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … Species theory In November 1845, Charles Darwin wrote to his friend and confidant Joseph …
  • … and  Fossil Cirripedia  (1851, 1854). What led Darwin to engage in this work when he was …
  • … group. Light is shed on the close relationship between Darwin’s systematic descriptive work and the …
  • … often frustrating taxonomical maze. Throughout these years, Darwin was also struggling with a …
  • … explained in detail in letters to friends and relatives, Darwin felt sufficiently restored in health …
  • … Nevertheless, it is evident from his correspondence that Darwin’s two hours at the microscope did …
  • … Phillips, and Daniel Sharpe, demonstrating the extent of Darwin’s continued involvement in …
  • … and naturalists, most notably James Dwight Dana, Henry Darwin Rogers, and Bernhard Studer, and the …
  • … In the midst of all this activity, Hooker responds to Darwin’s particular queries and sends …
  • … British government in scientific research during the period. Darwin also contributed to these …
  • … scientific work of naval officers and travellers in general. Darwin was asked by the editor, Sir …
  • … to J. F. W. Herschel, 4 February [1848] ). Letters between Darwin and Richard Owen, author of the …
  • … zoology between them. Owen included in his chapter notes by Darwin on the use of microscopes on …
  • … the leading questions and wide views spelt out by Darwin in the Admiralty  Manual  are also those …
  • … Inverness, in which he maintained that the terraces, which Darwin believed to be of marine origin, …
  • … of Glen Roy had produced a lake and the consequent beaches. Darwin carefully re-examined his own …
  • … editor of the  Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal , Darwin asked for it to be destroyed. Only the …
  • … ). Other letters to colleagues at this time indicate that Darwin was beginning to feel that the Glen …
  • … 8 [September 1847] ). The second geological theory Darwin felt the need to defend had to do …
  • … that only a great rush of water could carry them up hills. Darwin’s response was to explain such …
  • … rocks and foliation in metamorphic rocks, on the other. Darwin maintained that cleavage was the …
  • … to convince other prominent geologists, among them Lyell, so Darwin was keenly interested in what …
  • … subject. The letters also reveal that Lyell sought Darwin’s advice in the preparation of new …
  • … Manual of elementary geology . In addition, Lyell asked for Darwin’s view of his major new theory …
  • … on slopes with dips of more than three or four degrees. Even Darwin, Lyellian though he was, had …

Darwin and ecological science

Summary

The word ‘ecology’ did not exist until 1867, and was not used in an English publication until 1876; Darwin himself never used it, yet it was his work on the complex interactions of organisms and habitats that inspired the word’s creation and he is often…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … 1867, and was not used in an English publication until 1876; Darwin himself never used it, yet it …
  • … of ecology’.    Between 2006 and Darwin's bicentenary in 2009, with support …
  • … during the life of the grant,  ‘Was Darwin an ecologist?’ , explores how the word …
  • … ‘Beauty and the seed’ explores a puzzle that Darwin never solved – why some plants produce seeds …
  • … it. ‘The evolution of honeycomb’ follows Darwin’s experiments and observations on hive …
  • … regularity of the wax cells in honeycomb. ‘Darwin and Down’ explores Darwin’s use of …

Visiting the Darwins

Summary

'As for Mr Darwin, he is entirely fascinating…'  In October 1868 Jane Gray and her husband spent several days as guests of the Darwins, and Jane wrote a charming account of the visit in a sixteen-page letter to her sister.  She described Charles…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … As for Mr Darwin, he is entirely fascinating…   Darwin often discouraged would-be …
  • … her sister, Susan Loring.  She described Charles and Emma Darwin, their daughter Henrietta, Down …
  • … on— Since a severe attack of illness, Mr. Darwin sits on an easy chair raised very high, …
  • … and grounds Tuesday I had a little walk with Mrs. Darwin round their grounds— The house …
  • … easy chairs of all shapes & kinds, from Mr. Darwin’s great throne, to “the latest instrument of …
  • … After breakfast there were prayers in the drawing-room, Mrs. Darwin leading the services— Then some …
  • … a little uncertain, & kept very quiet all day— Darwin’s Expression experiment (or the …
  • … the glass!— The experiment was one in which Darwin asked a succession of visitors  to …
  • … were being stimulated by electric probes. Henrietta Darwin The oldest daughter …
  • … for Bromley, where we again took Cabs for Down, where Mr. Darwin lives— It was so dark by the time …
  • … first Cab, & whilst waiting for the second to draw up, Mr. Darwin came out into the hall to …
  • … home face! We made quite a party for dinner—Mr. & Mrs. Darwin, she in black velvet, two …
  • … Tyndal, Wm. Hooker, a boy of 16 but looking only 14, Leonard Darwin— I can’t get used to being grand …
  • … dinner with lively talk— When the ladies retired, Mrs. Darwin’s sister, Miss Wedgewood, & niece, …
  • … of the Country, will allow— Later I got talking with Mrs. Darwin & Mrs. Kempson, & happened …
  • … After breakfast there were prayers in the drawing-room, Mrs. Darwin leading the services— Then some …
  • … charming talks now & then— It was a rare chance when Mr. Darwin, Dr. Hooker, Dr. Tyndal & Dr …
  • … that does not often come in one’s way— Mrs. Darwin’s brother came to breakfast, Mr. Wedgewood, whose …
  • … quick interest in so many things. As for Mr. Darwin, he is entirely fascinating— He is tall & …
  • … in recommending “My Lady Ludlow”— Mrs. Darwin is very lovable, with her sweet, placid manner …
  • … & Mrs. Kempson came to dine— In the afternoon Mrs. Darwin took me in the carriage to call on the …
  • … walks. Tuesday I had a little walk with Mrs. Darwin round their grounds— The house faces, …
  • … easy chairs of all shapes & kinds, from Mr. Darwin’s great throne, to “the latest instrument of …
  • … always in use— Since a severe attack of illness, Mr. Darwin sits on an easy chair raised very high, …
  • … at lunch or breakfast— The two young footmen then— Mr. Darwin came to lunch, but always breakfasted …

Darwin in letters, 1851-1855: Death of a daughter

Summary

The letters from these years reveal the main preoccupations of Darwin’s life with a new intensity. The period opens with a family tragedy in the death of Darwin’s oldest and favourite daughter, Anne, and it shows how, weary and mourning his dead child,…

Matches: 21 hits

  • … letters from these years reveal the main preoccupations of Darwin’s life with a new intensity. The …
  • … life but I trust happy The anguish felt by Darwin is painfully expressed in letters …
  • … speak of her again. Yet the family gradually recovered, Darwin’s monographs were printed, and Darwin
  • … to the cirripedes. Before turning to his species work, Darwin somewhat ruefully recorded in his …
  • … monographs by natural history societies, though welcomed by Darwin, did not run smoothly. …
  • … the  Correspondence  describes the major achievements of Darwin’s cirripede work as a whole and …
  • … societies, which were supported by subscriptions, was that Darwin’s volumes were not publicly …
  • … in Germany at the forefront of work in invertebrate zoology, Darwin began a correspondence with …
  • … provided the foundations for a relationship with Darwin that soon developed into a valued friendship …
  • … April 1854, when his cirripede study was drawing to a close, Darwin re-entered London scientific …
  • … with lots of claret is what I want Perhaps Darwin’s decision to take a more active …
  • … to substantiate it is manifest in the correspondence. Darwin’s friends and colleagues were …
  • … outspoken young naturalists like Huxley, reacted eagerly to Darwin’s suggestions, although not …
  • … for the geographical distribution of animals and plants. Darwin began a series of researches on the …
  • … with the effects of known changes in climate and geology. Darwin boldly rejected the popular idea of …
  • … Some of the most interesting letters in this volume set out Darwin’s practical researches and …
  • … Variation and extinction The other main focus of Darwin’s research centred on determining the …
  • … seeds and bees An interest in variation naturally led Darwin to study the works of plant …
  • … views concerning decreased fertility of hybrids, Darwin began in the spring of 1855 a series of …
  • … a subject to which he returned in later years. Darwin also undertook experiments relating to …
  • … study, like another on sensitive plants, was an attempt by Darwin to ‘break the constitution of …

Interview with Tim Lewens

Summary

Dr Tim Lewens is a Lecturer in the Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Organisms and artifacts (2004), which examines the language and arguments for design in biology and philosophy, and of…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … and arguments for design in biology and philosophy, and of Darwin (2007), which considers the …
  • … belief, and the importance of a historical understanding of Darwin’s work.   …
  • … White: This is part of a series of interviews that the Darwin Correspondence Project at the …
  • … range of fields, and our aim is to discuss the importance of Darwin, historically and today, and to …
  • … for design in biology, and -just out – a wonderful book on Darwin and philosophy. Thanks very much …
  • … introduction. 2. The unusual role Darwin plays today Dr …
  • … the books which, frankly, are a bit of a harder read. So, Darwin’s study of variation, for example, …
  • … reason, I suppose, is basically the thought that, basically, Darwin got it right: in some sense or …
  • … I’d like to make. And another reason is that Darwin puzzles over so many of the conceptual …
  • … debates that we have right now. 3. Darwin’s reputation among scientists …
  • … in science. Do you think this has something to do with how Darwin’s reputation was forged in the …
  • … Einstein is as important for physics, I would say, as Darwin is for biology. There’s a …
  • … as deep philosophical questions. And so, if you think that Darwin’s basic views really do have …
  • … as I say, some people have viewed as certainly inherent in Darwin’s work. 4. …
  • … to that, if I can, is: what’s usually stripped out from Darwin’s own work now as in some ways being …
  • … 5. Does historical accuracy about Darwin matter? Dr White: Part of what we’re …
  • … - and in biology in particular – why should the historical Darwin matter at all? Dr Lewens: …
  • … contains the answer within it. I mean, the very fact that Darwin himself is used today by prominent …
  • … over what the real nature of Darwinism is, and the fact that Darwin is always invoked to try to …
  • … Darwinism, partly shows the importance of looking at what Darwin himself really said. You need to …
  • … as well as simply seeing whether or not the invocations of Darwin which real biologists these days …
  • … general view of life; a general philosophy – by looking at Darwin’s own claims more directly, as …

Darwin’s Networks

Summary

Darwin wrote to around 2000 people all over the world to help him tackle some fundamental questions about life on earth. To mark Charles Darwin's 213th birthday, we've added new networks on how his ideas spread in North America and how he…

Matches: 3 hits

  • Darwin wrote to around 2000 people all over the world to help him tackle some …
  • … more about the natural world. Explore Darwin’s Networks to see how the correspondence …
  • …   How did Darwin's ideas reach North America? View the network .  …

Instinct and the Evolution of Mind

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Slave-making ants For Darwin, slave-making ants were a powerful example of the force of instinct. He used the case of the ant Formica sanguinea in the On the Origin of Species to show how instinct operates—how…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … | Experiment Slave-making ants For Darwin, slave-making ants were a powerful …
  • … speculate about how it might have developed evolutionarily. Darwin corresponded about slave-making …
  • … with entomological experts who classified the ant species Darwin collected and advised him on how …
  • … in 1859, friends, acquaintances, and strangers wrote to Darwin about his treatment of the remarkable …
  • … Russel Wallace. The case of F. sanguinea intrigued Darwin's network of scientific …
  • … SOURCES Books Darwin, Charles. On the Origin of Species . 1859. London: John …
  • … Manuscripts Excerpts from Charles Darwin's Notebook C , p. 166 Excerpts …
  • … of Mind Letter 2226 —Frederick Smith to Darwin, 26 Feb 1858 In this letter, …
  • … Museum, identifies the species of an ant described by Darwin in a previous letter and advises him on …
  • … activities of F. sanguinea . Letter 2235 —Darwin to Frederick Smith, [before 9 Mar …
  • … mostly about the behavior of slave-making ants, which Darwin sent Smith. Darwin routinely sent …
  • … only to Smith. Letter 2456 —Frederick Smith to Darwin, 30 Apr 1859 Here Smith …
  • … known habitat in Britain. Letter 2265 —Charles Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [26 Apr …
  • … from other communities. Letter 2306 —Charles Darwin to Joseph Hooker, 13 [July 1858] …

Darwin and religion: a definitive web resource

Summary

I am aware that if we admit a first cause, the mind still craves to know whence it came and how it arose.  Charles Darwin to N. D. Doedes, 2 April 1873 Darwin is more famous, and more notorious than ever. Nowhere is this more evident than in the…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … it came and how it arose.   Charles Darwin to N. D. Doedes, 2 April 1873 …
  • … roots in the nineteenth-century controversies surrounding Darwin’s work on evolution. Yet Darwin is …
  • … in order to support a particular position. Whose Darwin is the true Darwin, and what are the …
  • … available key letters on on science and religion from Darwin's correspondence. The work was …
  • … ' Religion ' pages on this site.  The aim of the 'Darwin and religion' …
  • … through the engagement of the present with the past. Darwin’s letters provide a unique resource for …
  • … on people from a wide range of backgrounds. The picture that Darwin’s letters present of his …
  • … or indeed in most modern scholarship. At least 200 of Darwin’s correspondents were clergymen, …
  • … for morality and religious belief. The letters show that Darwin’s work could mean many different …
  • … of a fascinating series of letters exchanged between Darwin and his friend Asa Gray, Harvard …
  • … essay prize offered for the most interesting exploration of Darwin’s correspondence in the context …

What Darwin Read

Summary

Follow the links to resources about the books and papers, mostly scientific, that Darwin read as student at Edinburgh, during the Beagle voyage, and later in his life. Darwin and his family also read works of fiction by Anthony Trollope, George Eliot,…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … about the books and papers, mostly scientific, that Darwin read as student at Edinburgh, during the …

Darwin's 1874 letters go online

Summary

The full transcripts and footnotes of over 600 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1874 are published online for the first time. You can read about Darwin's life in 1874 through his letters and see a full list of the letters. The 1874 letters…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … and footnotes of over 600 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1874 are published online for …
  • … the Catholic zoologist St George Jackson Mivart caused Darwin and his son George. In an …
  • … licentiousness’. After re-reading what George had written, Darwin wrote:   I cannot …
  • … of [a] lying scoundrel.—  ( Letter to G. H. Darwin, 1 August [1874] ) The …
  • … behaviour in scientific society. Find out more about how Darwin and his family and friends dealt …
  • … W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ) At the age of 65, Darwin had reflective moments, although his …
  • … Letter to D. F. Nevill, 18 September [1874] ) Darwin’s family continued to prosper. His …
  • … ‘I am sure he will never voluntarily be idle’, wrote Darwin to the directors, fearing that Horace …
  • … career, married Amy Ruck and came to live in Down village as Darwin’s secretary. I …
  • … Letter to J. D. Hooker, 30 November [1874] ) Darwin’s continuing loyalty to his friends …
  • … in his post as director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Darwin used what influence he could to …

Darwin and the Church

Summary

The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It shows another side of the man who is more often remembered for his personal struggles with faith, or for his role in large-scale controversies over the…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It …
  • … unique window into this complicated relationship throughout Darwin’s life, as it reveals his …
  • … belief (and doubt) than many non-conformist denominations. Darwin’s parents attended a Unitarian …
  • … the necessary studies to be a clergyman. During Darwin’s lifetime, the vast majority of the …
  • … income was essential to enjoy a gentlemanly lifestyle. For Darwin, who could rely on the financial …
  • … compatible with the pursuit of scientific interests. Indeed, Darwin’s Cambridge mentor, John Stevens …
  • … (Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (1887): 321). Darwin started on his journey around the world …
  • … it even through a grove of Palms.—’ (letter to Caroline Darwin, 25–6 April [1832] ). Darwin’s …
  • … Museum or some other learned place’ (letter from E. A. Darwin, 18 August [1832] ). Writing to Fox …
  • … about—’ (letter to W. D. Fox, [9–12 August] 1835 ). Darwin’s doubts about orthodox belief, and …
  • … in 1838 and 1839, as can be read here. In the end, Darwin chose a middle course—a life of ease in …
  • … within six years of his return from the  Beagle  voyage, Darwin moved to Down House, in the …
  • … where their children Mary and Charles were buried; later Darwin’s brother Erasmus, Emma’s sister …
  • … of Emma, whose religious scruples are discussed here. But Darwin’s correspondence reveals his own …
  • … Although he was not the principal landowner in Down, Darwin was a gentleman of means, and clearly …
  • … made inroads on Anglican authority in the countryside. The Darwin family took an interest in, and …
  • … Many of the letters highlighted in this section focus on Darwin’s long-standing relationship with …
  • … To the end of his life Innes refused to be persuaded by Darwin’s theory of evolution, but …
  • … cordial; in the first extant letter of the correspondence, Darwin wrote to Innes expressing concern …
  • … to 1869 (letter to J. B. Innes, [8 May 1848] and n. 2). Darwin praised Innes to John William …
  • … from Down (letter to J. B. Innes, 15 December [1861] ). Darwin and Innes continued to correspond …
  • … Innes, 7 December 1868 ). Innes had a tendency to tease Darwin about his theories rather than …

Darwin’s hothouse and lists of hothouse plants

Summary

Darwin became increasingly involved in botanical experiments in the years after the publication of Origin. The building of a small hothouse - a heated greenhouse - early in 1863  greatly increased the range of plants that he could keep for scientific…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … Towards the end of 1862, Darwin resolved to build a small hothouse at Down House, for ‘experimental …
  • … hothouse early in 1863 marked something of a milestone in Darwin’s botanical work, since it greatly …
  • …  vol. 5, letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 April [1855] ). Darwin became increasingly involved in …
  • … Though his greenhouse was probably heated to some extent, Darwin found himself on several occasions …
  • … make observations and even experiments on his behalf. Darwin’s decision to build a hothouse …
  • … Hooker, 12 [December 1862] and n. 13). Initially, Darwin purchased for this purpose a glass …
  • … of 24 December [1862] ( Correspondence  vol. 10) Darwin told Hooker: I have …
  • … Encyclopedia of gardening  (Loudon 1835), a copy of which Darwin signed in 1841 (see the copy in …
  • … of heat’ (p. 1100). The latter was the sense in which Darwin used the word. The building of …
  • … accounts (Down House MS)). When it was completed, Darwin told Turnbull that without Horwood’s aid he …
  • … ). Even before work on the hothouse started, however, Darwin began making preparations to …
  • … plants’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January [1863] ). Darwin apparently refers to the catalogues …
  • … whom he had dealt over many years. In his letter to Hooker, Darwin mentioned that he hoped to be …
  • … (letter from J. D. Hooker, [15 January 1863] ). Darwin agreed to send Hooker his list of …
  • … (letter to J. D. Hooker, 30 January [1863] ). Darwin probably gave his list of plants to …
  • … [1863] ). On 20 February, the plants from Kew had arrived. Darwin was delighted, telling Hooker: ‘I …
  • … moss, peat, and charcoal (see the letter from Henrietta Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [22 …
  • … (see letter from J. D. Hooker, [6 March 1863] ). Darwin derived enormous pleasure from his …
  • … (letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] ). Darwin’s aesthetic appreciation of the …
  • … the tropics. Even before he left on the Beagle  voyage, Darwin used the hothouses in the …
  • … (see  Correspondence  vol. 1, letter to Caroline Darwin, [28 April 1831] ), and when, on the  …
  • … again’ ( Correspondence  vol. 1, letter to Catherine Darwin, May–June [1832] ). Years later, …
  • … 8 October [1845] ). Having indulged his senses, Darwin soon began the more serious work of …
  • … department at Kew, had helped select the plants for Darwin). Hooker had also sent seeds, and was …
  • … (letter to J. D. Hooker, 21 February [1863] ). Darwin’s hothouse became an important focus …

Francis Darwin

Summary

Known to his family as ‘Frank’, Charles Darwin’s seventh child himself became a distinguished scientist. He was an undergraduate at Trinity College, Cambridge, initially studying mathematics, but then transferring to natural sciences.  Francis completed…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … Known to his family as ‘Frank’, Charles Darwin’s seventh child himself became a distinguished …
  • … into debt and had kept the matter secret for some months. Darwin was very stern in his advice: ‘I …
  • … fellow as I daresay I appear to you’ (letter to Francis Darwin,  18 October [1870] ). …
  • … had been employed as his father's secretary and assistant. Darwin had been concerned about his …
  • … run by Julius von Sachs in Wurzburg.  Francis Darwin was elected to the Royal Society in 1882 …
  • … his father had not been knighted, although in 1877 Charles Darwin was awarded an honorary degree …
  • … The Power of Movement in Plants, 1880). Perhaps Francis Darwin, whom the family regarded as a …

Origin is 160; Darwin's 1875 letters now online

Summary

To mark the 160th anniversary of the publication of Origin of species, the full transcripts and footnotes of nearly 650 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1875 are published online for the first time. You can read about Darwin's life in 1875…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … and footnotes of nearly 650 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1875 are published online …
  • … printings before the end of the year. At the same time, Darwin was writing Cross and self …
  • … Royal Commission that was set up to look into the subject. Darwin’s second visit of the year to …
  • … and others at the Brown Institution, London, had assisted Darwin with his experiments on the …
  • … of animals when performing a painful experiment. Huxley told Darwin about Klein’s testimony: ‘ I …
  • … to any law, which should send him to the treadmill. ’ Darwin replied to Huxley: ‘ I am astounded …
  • … ( Letter to R. F. Cooke, 29 June [1875] ) Darwin wrote this to his publisher in June …
  • … Letter to J. D. Hooker, 18 August [1875] ) Darwin also completed second editions of …
  • … Frances Power Cobbe, a journalist and an acquaintance of Darwin’s, raised a petition and managed to …
  • … the matter was referred to a Royal Commission, before which Darwin gave evidence. An appendix on the …
  • … to be poor. John Lubbock, another local landowner and Darwin’s friend, attempted to make peace, …
  • … as yours almost always succeeds  ( Letter to G. H. Darwin, 13 October [1875] ) Darwin
  • … was an impassable barrier between animals and humans. Darwin’s son Francis, who was working as his …
  • … The year was saddened by the death of several of Darwin’s correspondents, including one of his …
  • … [12 December 1875] ) In December, Darwin was involved in more controversy. He was …
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