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Darwin Correspondence Project

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Darwin Correspondence Project
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Wedgwood and Emma and Darwin and Emma and 1866 in keywords disabled_by_default
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From J. D. Hooker to Emma Darwin   [21 March 1866]

Summary

Mrs Hooker will not come with him to Down on Saturday.

Author:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Addressee:  Emma Wedgwood; Emma Darwin
Date:  [21 Mar 1866]
Classmark:  DAR 102: 67
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5078

Matches: 1 hit

From Emily Catherine Langton to Emma and Charles Darwin   [6 and 7? January 1866]

Summary

CL is aware that she is dying and so says her farewells.

Author:  Emily Caroline (Lena) Massingberd; Emily Caroline (Lena) Langton; Emily Caroline (Lena) Massingberd
Addressee:  Emma Wedgwood; Emma Darwin; Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [6 and 7? Jan 1866]
Classmark:  V&A / Wedgwood Collection (MS W/M 202)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4968

Matches: 2 hits

  • Wedgwood Collection (MS W/M 202) Emily Caroline (Lena) Massingberd/Emily Caroline (Lena) Langton/Emily Caroline (Lena) Massingberd unstated [6 and 7? Jan 1866] Emma Wedgwood/Emma Darwin
  • … February 1866  and n.  1). Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood , known as Elizabeth, was Emma Darwin’ …

From Anne Marsh-Caldwell   27 November [1866]

Summary

Writing for Mr Corbet, she asks what diet has helped in the treatment of CD’s illness.

Author:  Anne Caldwell; Anne Marsh; Anne Marsh-Caldwell
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  27 Nov [1866]
Classmark:  DAR 171: 41
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5286

Matches: 1 hit

From H. B. Jones   10 February [1866]

Summary

Sends a diet for CD’s flatulence.

Author:  Henry Bence Jones
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  10 Feb [1866]
Classmark:  DAR 168: 77
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5003

Matches: 1 hit

  • Emma Darwin’s brother, Josiah Wedgwood III ( Freeman 1978 ). CD began riding the cob, Tommy, on 4 June 1866 ( …

To J. D. Hooker   31 May [1866]

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Summary

Comments on JDH’s list – very good, but Orchids and Primula paper have too indirect a bearing to be worth mentioning. The Eozoon is a very important fact and to a much lesser degree the Archaeopteryx. Müller’s Für Darwin [1864] perhaps the most important contribution.

CD has forgotten to mention Bates on variation and JDH’s Arctic paper ["Distribution of Arctic plants", Trans. Linn. Soc. Lond. 23 (1862): 251–348] in new edition of Origin.

Now finds that Owen claims to be originator of natural selection.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Date:  31 May [1866]
Classmark:  DAR 115: 290
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5106

Matches: 1 hit

To H. W. Bates   11 June [1862]

Summary

Encloses a question [missing] concerning language [from Hensleigh Wedgwood].

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Henry Walter Bates
Date:  11 June [1862]
Classmark:  American Philosophical Society (Mss.B.D25.284)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-3596

Matches: 1 hit

To J. D. Hooker   30 August [1866]

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Summary

Pleased by JDH’s success. JDH gives argument for occasional transport with perfect fairness.

W. R. Grove’s address [see 5201] good, but is disappointed that species part was so general.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Date:  30 Aug [1866]
Classmark:  DAR 115: 299
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5200

Matches: 1 hit

  • Wedgwood . Her letter has not been found but her account of Hooker’s lecture was copied in a letter from Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [September 1866] ( …

To W. D. Fox   24 August [1866]

Summary

Family news. Describes [final] illness of Susan Darwin [d. 3 Oct 1866]. CD’s health better.

Making rapid progress on Variation.

Has heard of hybrids between moths mentioned by WDF.

Work on [4th] edition of Origin has delayed Variation.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  William Darwin Fox
Date:  24 Aug [1866]
Classmark:  Smithsonian Libraries and Archives (Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology MSS 405 A. Gift of the Burndy Library)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5197

Matches: 1 hit

  • 1866] (DAR 251: 2240)). Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242) recorded, ‘Boys went to Norway’ on 16  August 1866. CD’s sister, Susan Elizabeth Darwin , was seriously ill. The reference is to Caroline Sarah Wedgwood . …

To Thomas Gold Appleton   2 March [1866]

Summary

The specimen is not a fish but the larva of some batrachian or frog-like animal. Has sent it to British Museum, which says it resembles the axolotl of Mexico.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Thomas Gold Appleton
Date:  2 Mar [1866]
Classmark:  Boston Public Library Rare Books and Print Departments–Courtesy of the Trustees
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5427

Matches: 1 hit

  • 1866 . Appleton had visited Down House in October 1849 ( Emma Darwin’s diary (DAR 242)). Emma Darwin’s cousin, Robert James Mackintosh , had married Appleton’s sister (Wedgwood

From Eliza Meteyard   17 November 1865

Summary

Returns 19 of the letters CD lent her, so that he can choose one for the Autographic Mirror.

Author:  Eliza Meteyard
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  17 Nov 1865
Classmark:  DAR 171: 161
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-4937

Matches: 1 hit

  • Emma Darwin . Meteyard refers either to the second volume of her life of Josiah Wedgwood I ( Meteyard 1865–6 ), which was published in September 1866 ( …

To Emma Darwin   [22 May 1848]

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Summary

His health not good.

Has been reading John Evelyn’s Life of Mrs Godolphin, and Mme Sévigné.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Emma Wedgwood; Emma Darwin
Date:  [22 May 1848]
Classmark:  DAR 210.8: 28
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1177

Matches: 1 hit

  • Emma Darwin’s diary records that her sisters Elizabeth Wedgwood and Charlotte Langton , and Charlotte’s son Edmund, were staying at Down. The Globe , a London evening paper founded in 1803 and a leading Whig organ until 1866  …

From J. D. Hooker   13 May 1866

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Summary

Refers to enclosure from Asa Gray

with whom he can talk calmly now that war is over. North had no right to resort to bloodshed.

Startled by CD’s attendance at Royal Society soirée.

Has asked E. B. Tylor to make up questions for consuls and missionaries, through whose wives a lot of most curious information [for Descent?] could be obtained.

Tying umbilical cord has always been a mystery to JDH.

John Crawfurd’s paper on cultivated plants is shocking twaddle ["On the migration of cultivated plants in reference to ethnology", J. Bot. Br. & Foreign 4 (1866): 317–32].

R. T. Lowe back from Madeira.

Author:  Joseph Dalton Hooker
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  13 May 1866
Classmark:  DAR 102: 71–4
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5089

Matches: 1 hit

  • Wedgwood ware, and was particularly interested in medallions (see Correspondence vols.  11 and 12, and this volume, letter from J.  D.  Hooker, [22 November 1866] ). Hooker visited Down from 23 to 25 June 1866; his wife, Frances Harriet Hooker , visited from 23 to 29  June ( Emma Darwin’ …

To the Darwin children   16 September 1881

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Summary

A circular letter on the distribution of his money at death and the division ofErasmus’ estate.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Elizabeth (Bessy, Lizzy) Darwin; Francis Darwin; George Howard Darwin; Horace Darwin; Leonard Darwin; William Erasmus Darwin; Henrietta Emma Darwin; Henrietta Emma Litchfield
Date:  16 Sept 1881
Classmark:  DAR 210.6: 183
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-13340

Matches: 1 hit

  • Wedgwood , and Catherine Darwin . Thomas Salt was a solicitor in Shrewsbury. Josiah Wedgwood II left his estate to his four sons, Josiah Wedgwood III , Hensleigh Wedgwood , Henry Allen Wedgwood , and Francis Wedgwood , and his three surviving daughters, Emma Darwin , Elizabeth Wedgwood , and Charlotte Langton . Mr Norman was probably George Warde Norman . Catherine Langton (née Darwin), in her will, dated 9 January 1866, …

From William Erasmus Darwin to Emma Darwin   28 February [1868]

Summary

Crying in babies.

Author:  William Erasmus Darwin
Addressee:  Emma Wedgwood; Emma Darwin
Date:  28 Feb [1868]
Classmark:  DAR 162: 86
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-5952

Matches: 1 hit

  • 1866 ( Alum. Cantab. ). The natural sciences tripos was established in 1851 for students who had received a BA in classics or mathematics; it was opened to men who were studying for the BA in 1861 ( Brooke 1988–2004 , 3: 203–4, 231–2, 4: 153–7; see also MacLeod and Moseley 1982). Trinity College awarded scholarships in the natural sciences in 1869 and 1870 ( Cambridge University calendar 1869 and 1870). Leith Hill Place in Surrey was the home of Josiah Wedgwood III , Emma Darwin’ …