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Darwin Correspondence Project

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Darwin Correspondence Project
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Sanderson, John (1838–1903)

Matches: 2 hits

  • … and Inventories), 1876-1936 (Ancestry.com, accessed 01 July 2019) Scotland, Select Births …
  • … and Baptisms, 1564-1950 (Ancestry.com, accessed 01 July 2019 28 …

To Otto Zacharias   17 April [1878]

Summary

Doesn’t know anything about the insects in question, but has sent the photographs on to an expert in London.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Otto Zacharias
Date:  17 Apr [1878]
Classmark:  University of Southern California Libraries, Special Collections, Feuchtwanger Memorial Library (Collection no. 0204, Lion Feuchtwanger papers, Box 01)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-11478F

Matches: 1 hit

  • … no. 0204, Lion Feuchtwanger papers, Box 01) Charles Robert Darwin Down 17 Apr [1878] Otto …

To Karl von Scherzer   1 April 1878

Summary

Glad to hear of Ernst Haeckel’s reception in Vienna.

R. Virchow’s address ["Liberty of science", Nature 17 (1877–8): 72–4, 92–4, 111–13] very arrogant.

Sorry to hear of death of Arthur Lane.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Karl von Scherzer
Date:  1 Apr 1878
Classmark:  University of Southern California Libraries, Special Collections, Feuchtwanger Memorial Library (Collection no. 0204, Lion Feuchtwanger papers, Box 01)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-11460

Matches: 1 hit

  • … no. 0204, Lion Feuchtwanger papers, Box 01) Charles Robert Darwin Down 1 Apr 1878 Karl von …

From Edward Cresy   10 November 1860

Summary

Explains discrepancies in weights and measures caused by changes since 1836 in apothecaries’ measures.

EC has found that a discrepancy in A. W. von Hofmann’s experiments with iodine solutions resulted from an error in Hofmann’s use of decimals.

Reports S. P. Woodward’s opinion of the Origin: "a very sad book, it unsettles all one’s religious principles and the worst of it is so much of it is true".

Author:  Edward Cresy, Jr
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  10 Nov 1860
Classmark:  DAR 58.1: 7, 9
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2980

Matches: 4 hits

  • … of iodine in 1 kilogramme of water. i.e. .01 milligramme per gramme. [diag] The original …
  • … of the solution containing therefore .01 milligramme that is 1 100 of a milligramme, & he …
  • … 1000 grammes = 1 kilogramme = 1 litre—gives .01 per gramme and in this the Sec says I am …
  • … to write a milligramme .001 then the D rs .01 becomes .00001 a very clumsy figure to work …

To J. S. Burdon Sanderson   30 April [1876]

Summary

Suggests JSBS’s new machine for observing arterial action be used to test CD’s hypothesis that blushing is caused by thinking intensely about a part of the body and thus releasing the arteries.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Scott Burdon Sanderson, baronet
Date:  30 Apr [1876]
Classmark:  University of British Columbia Library, Rare Books and Special Collections (Darwin - Burdon Sanderson letters RBSC-ARC-1731-1-01)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-10485

Matches: 1 hit

  • … Burdon Sanderson letters RBSC-ARC-1731-1-01) Charles Robert Darwin London, Queen Anne St, …

From Leonard Darwin   [after 14 February 1874]

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Summary

Statistics showing rate of decline of population in Sandwich Islands, 1832–72.

Author:  Leonard Darwin
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  [after 14 Feb 1874]
Classmark:  DAR 90: 8
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-8709

Matches: 2 hits

  • … The an-decrease percent from 1850 to 1860 is 2 . 01—much more in accordance with the other …
  • … the date right. —4 . 6 1836 —1 . 97 1850 —2 . 01 1860 —2 . 06 1866 —2 . 10 The 4 . 6 seems …

Kennard, C. A. (1827–1907)

Matches: 2 hits

  • … Paper: Boston Daily Advertiser; Date: 06-01-1885; Volume: 145; Issue: 23560; Page: 8; …
  • … published as Boston Daily Journal; Date: 06-01-1891; Volume: LVIII; Issue: 19008; Page: [ …
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Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … begin to think a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). I am …
  • … Darwin’s network of informers proved very fruitful. On 1 May , Darwin received a letter from …

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … was reluctant to do so, as he confessed to Darwin on 1 June : ‘the heat of battle is not the time …

Darwin in letters, 1867: A civilised dispute

Summary

Charles Darwin’s major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work, The variation of animals and plants under domestication (Variation). The importance of Darwin’s network of correspondents becomes vividly apparent in his work on expression in…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … consume Darwin’s time. The first proof-sheets arrived on 1 March 1867 and the tedious work of …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

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Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

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Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

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Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … selection might work in nature ( letter from Charles Lyell, 1–2 May 1856, n. 10 ). He was …
  • … & eternal hermaphrodite’ ( letter to to T. H. Huxley, 1 July [1856] ), which became a source …

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

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Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

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Darwin in letters, 1877: Flowers and honours

Summary

Ever since the publication of Expression, Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The year 1877 was no exception. The spring and early summer were spent completing Forms of flowers, his fifth book on a botanical topic. He then turned to the…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … red cabbage were traced over time: ‘Bristle was gummed to 1 Cot. & beyond it a triangular bit of …

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

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Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … a difficulty for his theory ( Origin  4th ed., pp. 450–1). Croll’s theory, simply stated, proposed …

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

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Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

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Darwin in letters, 1860: Answering critics

Summary

On 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s Origin of species, printing off another 3000 copies to satisfy the demands of an audience that surprised both the publisher and the author. It wasn't long, however, before ‘the…

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Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

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Darwin in letters, 1847-1850: Microscopes and barnacles

Summary

Darwin's study of barnacles, begun in 1844, took him eight years to complete. The correspondence reveals how his interest in a species found during the Beagle voyage developed into an investigation of the comparative anatomy of other cirripedes and…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … in little frequented countries.’ ( Collected papers  1: 228). Not surprisingly, the leading …
  • … of the geological results of the  Beagle  voyage, on 1 October 1846, Darwin at last found time to …
  • … the ‘curious’ genus  Sagitta  ( Collected papers 1: 177–82) and another on marine and terrestial  …
  • … His  Beagle  diary of zoological observations (DAR 31.1: 305–8) contains a description, dated 8 …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … & what is delightful, I am able to write easy work for about 1½ hours every day’ ( letter to H. …

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … on the parallel roads of Glen Roy’,  Collected papers  1: 88–137). Darwin later abandoned this …

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 1 hits

  • …  vol. 2, letter to A. Y. Spearman, 9 October 1843, n. 1). Darwin's inner circle: first …
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