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Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 23 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • be done by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August
  • pleasures of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such
  • Andone looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). …
  • was an illusory hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] …
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • had been in two volumes and had cost twenty-four shillings.) Murrays partner, Robert Francis Cooke, …
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • Quarterly Review  discussing works on primitive man by John Lubbock and Edward Burnett Tylor. It
  • of anonymous reviews. Its proprietor was none other than John Murray, Darwins publisher. So
  • wording of both the letter to the editor and the letter to Murray to accompany it. The depth of
  • to review me in a hostile spirit’ ( letter to John Murray, 11 August 1874 ). Darwin was
  • Correspondence  vol. 20, letter to St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwins relief, …
  • number of the Review & in the same type’  ( letter from John Murray, 12 August 1874 ). George
  • anonymous reviews. While staying with Hooker over Christmas, John Tyndall, professor at and
  • the moment of being hatched ( letter to  Nature , 7 and 11 May [1874] ; Spalding 1872a). …
  • … & that must be enough for me’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). Plants that eat . …
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • details of an Australian variety of sundew ( letter from T. C. Copland, 23 June 1874 ). …
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 24 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can
  • of   On the origin of   species , intended to be Darwins last, and of  Expression of the
  • books brought a strong if deceptive sense of a job now done: Darwin intended, he declared to Alfred
  • anything more on 'so difficult a subject, as evolution’ ( letter to ARWallace,  27 July
  • of books and papers, and the latter formed the subject of Darwins last bookThe formation of   …
  • to spread my views’, he wrote to his publisher, John Murray, on 30 January , shortly after
  • The public are accustomed to novels for 1s’, he wrote to Murray on 8 January , but Murray
  • best efforts, set the final price at 7 s.  6 d.  ( letter from RFCooke, 12 February 1872 ) …
  • condition as I can make it’, he wrote to the translator ( letter to JJMoulinié, 23 September
  • remained unpublished at the end of the year ( letter from C.-FReinwald, 23 November 1872 ). …
  • the new edition in the United States, Darwin arranged with Murray to have it stereotyped. Before the
  • St George Jackson Mivart ( letter to St GJMivart,  11 January [1872] ). A worsening
  • Whale  & duck  most beautiful’ ( letter from ARWallace, 3 March 1872 ). I
  • Mivart not to acknowledge it ( letter to St GJMivart, 11 January [1872] ). 'I hate
  • … `chiefly perhaps because I do it badly’ ( letter to ARWallace, 3 August [1872] ).  …
  • attacks on Darwin became notorious, had written on 11 May expressing concern that his recently, …
  • from his ignorance, he feels no doubts’ ( letter to FCDonders, 17 June 1872 ). Right up to the
  • Hookers cause was taken up by his friends, in particular John Lubbock and John Tyndall, as one
  • well informed: `The die is cast’, he wrote excitedly on 11 May , when the matter was first raised
  • to Gladstone a week later ( enclosure to letter from John Lubbock to WEGladstone, 20 June 1872
  • Charlton Bastians recent book on the origin of life (HCBastian 1872; Wallace 1872d) left him
  • … & new views which are daily turning up’ ( letter to ARWallace, 28 August [1872] ).  …
  • Lord Sackville Cecil, to attend a séance ( letter from MCStanley, 4 June 1872 ). There was
  • gift, although he doubted he would ever use it ( letter to CLDodgson, 10 December 1872 ). …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 25 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters
  • am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • to mans place in nature  both had a direct bearing on Darwins species theory and on the problem
  • fromsome Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] …
  • … ‘I declare I never in my life read anything grander’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 26 [February 1863] …
  • than  Origin had (see  Correspondence  vol. 8, letter to Charles Lyell, 10 January [1860] ). …
  • regarding species change ( letter from Charles Lyell, 11 March 1863 ). The botanist Asa Gray, …
  • by descent put himinto despair’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 11 May [1863] ). In the same letter, he
  • bottom of seas, lakes, and rivers ( Correspondence vol. 11, Appendix VII). Quarrels at
  • sentence from the second edition of  Antiquity of man  (C. Lyell 1863b, p. 469), published in
  • were himself, Hooker, Huxley, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Lubbock. Honours abroad
  • Academy of Sciences, Berlin (see Correspondence vol. 11, Appendix III), and of the Société des
  • unsuccessful ( see letter from E. A. Darwin to Emma Darwin, 11 November [1863] ). The council of
  • of the Royal Society ( see letter from Edward Sabine to John Phillips, 12 November 1863 ). …
  • … [9 May 1863] , and memorandum from G. H. Darwin, [before 11 May 1863]) . As he struggled
  • to drive the quietest man mad’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 11 May [1863] ). Hooker and Gray agreed
  • year with the Hertfordshire nurseryman Thomas Rivers. John Scott Darwin had found a
  • of hybridity and sterility at the end of the previous year. John Scott, a gardener at the Royal
  • the results of which were published in 1868 ( see letter to John Scott, 25 and 28 May [1863] ). …
  • hoped would counteract Huxleys criticism ( letter from John Scott, 23 July [1863] ). Darwin
  • very slowly recovering, but am very weak’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [29 September? 1863] ). …
  • Thomass Hospital, London ( letter from George Busk, [ c. 27 August 1863] ). Brinton, who

Darwin in letters, 1867: A civilised dispute

Summary

Charles Darwin’s major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work, The variation of animals and plants under domestication (Variation). The importance of Darwin’s network of correspondents becomes vividly apparent in his work on expression in…

Matches: 23 hits

  • …   Charles Darwins major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work,  …
  • couple of months were needed to index the work, a task that Darwin handed over to someone else for
  • and animals  ( Expression ), published in 1872. Although Darwin had been collecting material and
  • A global reputation The importance of Darwins network of correspondents becomes vividly
  • of the size of the two-volume work from his publisher, John Murray, he wrote to Murray on 3
  • a chapteron Man’. After a few days, he wrote back to Murray proposing that some of the more
  • suppose abuse is as good as praise for selling a Book’ ( letter to John Murray, 31 January [1867] …
  • to the printer, but without the additional chapter. In a letter written on 8 February [1867] to
  • booksDescent  and  Expression . In the same letter, Darwin revealed the conclusion to his
  • variation of animals and plants under domestication . In a letter to his son William dated 27
  • of his brothers embryological papers with his first letter to Darwin of 15 March 1867 , although
  • to translate  Variation . Indeed, he told his publisher, John Murray, in a letter of 4 April
  • time it took William Sweetland Dallas to prepare the index. John Murray had engaged Dallas and
  • asking again for information on Fuegian expressions. On 11 January 1867, Sulivan replied , …
  • to Alfred Russel Wallace, who suggested in his response of 11 March [1867] that Darwin send his
  • see your second volume onThe Struggle for Existence &c.” for I doubt if we have a sufficiency
  • … “supplemental remarks on expression”’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [1217] March [1867] ). Darwins
  • was sure that the colours were protective and suggested that John Jenner Weir might conduct
  • level. In his response to Wallace ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 26 February [1867] ), Darwin defended
  • to the work I shall find it much better done by you than I c d  have succeeded in doing’ ( letter
  • Darwins theory (letter from Fritz to Hermann Müller, 11 February 1867, in Möller ed. 191521, 2: …
  • I have not a word to say against it but such a view c d  hardly come into a scientific book’ ( …
  • Wallace published a long article, ‘Creation by law’ (A. R. Wallace 1867c), which responded to Jenkin

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • on a paper on  Verbascum (mullein) by CDs protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. …
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • also a serious dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and Charles Lyell . These
  • The death of Hugh Falconer Darwins first letter to Hooker of 1865 suggests that the family
  • having all the Boys at home: they make the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] …
  • had failed to include among the grounds of the award ( see letter from Hugh Falconer to Erasmus
  • his letters to Darwin, and Darwin responded warmly: ‘Your letter is by far the grandest eulogium
  • may well rest content that I have not laboured in vain’ ( letter to Hugh Falconer, 6 January [1865] …
  • always a most kind friend to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] …
  • Appendix II). In May, he invited a new doctor, John Chapman, to Down and began a course of Chapmans
  • Variation . In March Darwin wrote to his publisher, John Murray, ‘Of present book I have 7
  • will be ready for the press in the autumn’ ( letter to John Murray, 4 April [1865] ). In early
  • am never idle when I can do anything’ ( letter to John Murray, 2 June [1865] ). It was not until
  • Darwin had received a copy of Müllers bookFür Darwin , a study of the Crustacea with reference
  • crossing experiments in 1863 (see Correspondence  vol. 11, letter from John Scott, 21 September
  • … … inheritance, reversion, effects of use & disuse &c’, and which he intended to publish in
  • interest in Darwins theory ( Correspondence vol. 11, letter from J. D. Hooker, 10 June 1863 ) …
  • He wrote to Hooker, ‘I doubt whether you or I or any one c d  do any good in healing this breach. …
  • Hookers behalf, ‘He asks if you saw the article of M r . Croll in the last Reader on the
  • … ‘As for your thinking that you do not deserve the C[opley] Medal,’ he rebuked Hooker, ‘that I

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those …
  • … a broad variety of women had access to, and engaged with, Darwin's published works. A set of …
  • … Were women a target audience? Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • … her to read to check that she can understand it. Letter 7312 - Darwin to Darwin, F. …
  • … from all but educated, typically-male readers. Letter 7124 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E …
  • … he seeks her help with tone and style. Letter 7329 - Murray , J. to Darwin, [28 …
  • … in order to minimise impeding general perusal. Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, …
  • … he uses to avoid ownership of indelicate content. Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to …
  • … in Expression . Letter 10072 - Pape, C. to Darwin, [16 July 1875] …
  • … in her garden. Letter 13650 Kennard, C. A. to Darwin, [28 January 1882] …
  • … work. Letter 5861 - Blyth, E. to Darwin, [11 February 1868] Zoologist …
  • … Variation . Letter 6126 - Binstead, C. H. to Darwin, [17 April 1868] …
  • … of Variation . Letter 6237 - Bullar, R. to Darwin, [9 June 1868] …
  • … - Innes, J. B. to Darwin, [31 August 1868] John Innes reports that he has read …
  • Letter 9633 - Nevill, D. F. to Darwin, [11 September 1874] Dorothy Nevill tells …

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 28 hits

  • The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his
  • book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwins time for the rest of the year was devoted
  • way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from
  • offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be
  • a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate centred on Darwins evolutionary account of the
  • taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases
  • on 24 February, and all 2500 copies were sold in a week. ‘Murray says he istorn to piecesby
  • on 28 February . Demand continued throughout the year, and Murray produced three more printings, …
  • do to talk about it, which no doubt promotes the sale’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 26 March 1871 ) …
  • … £1470 for the first two printings, Darwin wrote to Murray on 20 March 1871 , ‘It is quite a grand
  • to her liking, ‘to keep in memory of the book’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 20 March 1871 ). …
  • and had forsaken his lunch and dinner in order to read it ( letter from James Crichton-Browne, 19
  • they believe to be the truth, whether pleasant or not’ (letter from W. W. Reade, 21 February 1871). …
  • and OldhamThey club together to buy them’ ( letter from W. B. Dawkins, 23 February 1871 ). …
  • and the heavy use of their arms and legs ( letter from C. L. Bernays, 25 February 1871 ). Samples
  • Arthur Nicols, 7 March 1871 ; letter from B. J. Sulivan, 11 March 1871 ; letter from Hermann
  • expressed by Darwins old friend, the former vicar of Down John Brodie Innes. Darwin and Innes had
  • is a thing which I sh d  feel very proud of, if anyone c d . say of me.’ After the publication
  • … ‘a windbag full of metaphysics & classics’ ( letter to John Murray, 13 April [1871] ). …
  • Gazette , and wrote to its author, who turned out to be John Morley, a leading advocate of
  • was achieved throughthe medium of opinion, positive law &c’, and transmitted by culture, not
  • by his wife and children. William offered his assessment of John Stuart Mills theory of
  • suspected that very few would actually sell (letters to John Murray, 17 August [1871] and 13
  • in the world except. laughing. crying grinning pouting &c. &c’, he wrote to Hooker on 21
  • so giddy I can hardly sit up, so no more’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 4 August [1871] ). On 23
  • annually on an acre of land at 16 tons (letter from L. C. Wedgwood, [20 November 1871] ). He also
  • … ( letter to Asa Gray, 16 July [1871] , letter to S. R. S. Norton, 23 November [1871] ). …
  • avenerable old Ape’ ( letter from D. Thomas, [after 11 March 1871] ).  Descent  and

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If any
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • in satisfying female preference in the mating process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, …
  • book would take the form of ashort essayon man ( letter to Ernst Haeckel, 3 July 1868 ). But
  • as well say, he would drink a little and not too much’ ( letter to Albert Günther, 15 May [1868] ) …
  • domestication . Having been advertised by the publisher John Murray as early as 1865, the two
  • increased the amount of work substantially. Darwin asked Murray to intervene, complaining on 9
  • a great loss to the Book’. But Darwins angry letter to Murray crossed one from Dallas to himself, …
  • a cheque to Dallas for £55  s ., and recommended to Murray that Dallas receive additional payment. …
  • profound contempt of me. I feel convinced it is by Owen’. John Edward Gray, a colleague of Richard
  • … . It is a disgrace to the paper’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 24 February [1868] ). The review was
  • April 1868 . The letter was addressed tothe Rev d  C. Darwin M.d’; Binstead evidently assumed
  • the enthusiastic breeder, who apologised in a letter of 1113 May 1868 for hisvoluminuous zeal
  • Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual selection On 11 February , Darwin wrote to the
  • I did not see this, or rather I saw it only obs[c]urely, & have kept only a few references.’ …
  • views differed. Of deer-hounds, Cupples wrote between 11 and 13 May , ‘much depends on the
  • as life he wd find the odour sexual!’ ( letter to A . R. Wallace, 16 September [1868] ). Francis
  • of her two-month old daughter Katherine ( letter from C. M. Hawkshaw to Emma Darwin, 9 February
  • rest mostly on faith, and on accumulation of adaptations, &c) … Of course I understand your
  • … ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868], n. 11 ). ‘I am not sure’, Darwin reflected in a

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 21 hits

  • 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwins life. From a quiet rural existence
  • he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace. This
  • the composition and publication, in November 1859, of Darwins major treatise  On the origin of
  • …  exceeded my wildest hopes By the end of 1859, Darwins work was being discussed in
  • has  infinitely  exceeded my wildest hopes.—’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 25 [November 1859] ). …
  • The 'big book' The year 1858 opened with Darwin hard at work preparing hisbig
  • his ninth chapter, on hybridism, on 29 December 1857, Darwin began in January 1858 to prepare the
  • to choose from the load of curious facts on record.—’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 31 January [1858] ). …
  • as evidence for what actually occurred in nature ( see letter to Asa Gray, 4 April [1858] , and  …
  • throwing away what you have seen,’ he told Hooker in his letter of 8 [June 1858] , ‘yet I have
  • work—& that I confess made me a little lowbut I c d . have borne it, for I have the
  • his work was interrupted by the arrival of the now-famous letter from Alfred Russel Wallace, …
  • the accuracy of Darwins words has been questioned by John L. Brooks and by H. Lewis McKinney, both
  • ideas (see letters to J. D. Hooker, 2 March [1859] , 11 March [1859] , and 7 April [1859] ) …
  • Lyell, 28 March [1859] ). Lyell suggested the firm of John Murray, publishers of the second edition
  • of Lyells works, and well-known for its scientific list. Murray agreed to publish Darwins book
  • … , for his opinion. Elwins long and considered reply to Murray is published in this volume. Despite
  • to the original plan of his book (see letter from Elwin to Murray, 3 May 1859 , and letter to
  • … (letters to Charles Lyell, 28 March [1859] , and to John Murray, 10 September [1859] ), but
  • 24 November 1859 ). Equally painful was the news that John Frederick William Herschel, whom he so
  • it is impossible that men like Lyell, Hooker, Huxley, H. C. Watson, Ramsay &c would change their

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 21 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now
  • of scientific admirers at Down, among them Robert Caspary, John Traherne Moggridge, and Ernst
  • Pound foolish, Penurious, Pragmatical Prigs’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [29 December 1866] ). But
  • able to write easy work for about 1½ hours every day’ ( letter to H. B. Jones, 3 January [1866] ). …
  • once daily to make the chemistry go on better’ ( letter from H. B. Jones, 10 February [1866] ). …
  • regime led to Darwins being teased by his neighbour, John Lubbock, about the prospect of riding to
  • On 21 February Darwin received notification from John Murray that stocks of the third edition of  …
  • you go on, after the startling apparition of your face at R.S. Soirèewhich I dreamed of 2 nights
  • so you are in for it’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [  c . 10 May 1866] ). Henriettas
  • Haeckel. The German zoologist had written to Darwin on 11 January 1866 , ‘Every time I succeed in
  • teleological development ( see for example, letter to C. W. Nägeli, 12 June [1866] ). Also in
  • common broom ( Cytisus scoparius ) and the white broom ( C. multiflorus ) in his botanical
  • and June on the subject of  Rhamnus catharticus  (now  R. cathartica ). Darwin had become
  • … (Correspondence vol. 9, letter from Asa Gray, 11 October 1861 ). Darwin wished to establish
  • of separate sexes. William gathered numerous specimens of  R. catharticus , the only species of  …
  • diœcious’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [7 May11 June 1866] ). On examining more specimens later
  • replied with a modified list, adding Fritz Müllers  Für Darwin , and a recent fossil discovery in
  • selection, and with special creation ( letter from W. R. Grove, 31 August 1866 ). Hooker later
  • … ‘business would be totally paralysed’. Similarly, John Murray gave as a reason for his decision to
  • … ‘I am glad to hear from Spencer’, Huxley wrote on 11 November , ‘that you are on the right (that
  • indeed at poor Susans loneliness’ ( letter from E. C. Langton to Emma and Charles Darwin, [6 and 7

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Observers Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August
  • silkworm breeds, or peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to
  • to artificially fertilise plants in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to
  • be made on seeds of Pulmonaria officinalis . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • to Darwin, [1873] Ellen Lubbock, wife of naturalist John Lubbock, responds to Darwins
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John Scott responds to Darwins queries
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 4928  - Henslow, G. to Darwin, [11 November 1865] J. S. Henslows son