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Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 25 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect
  • for ease of distribution sometime in late 1867 or early 1868. Darwin went over his questions, …
  • was the collection of observations on a global scale. Darwin was especially interested in peoples
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • in Ceylon, wrote the botanist George Thwaites on 22 July 1868 , “all endeavour to drill their
  • for other peoples or vice versa. The Scottish botanist John Scott wrote from Calcutta, 4 May 1868
  • and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such
  • the collection of information to its display in print. After Darwin received all of the replies to
  • exceptyesorno.” “The same state of mindDarwin would later assert in Expression of the
  • uniformity.” Table of Correspondence about Darwins Questionnaire (click on the letter
  • could available online ahead of schedule as part of theDarwin and Human Natureproject, funded by
  • nodding vertically Blair, R.H. 11 July
  • Fuegians Brooke, C.A.J. 30 Nov 1870
  • Dyaks Brooke, C.A.J. 30 April 1871
  • Bulmer, J 13 Aug 1868 [Gipps Land, nr. Flemington? …
  • Bunnett, Templeton 13 Aug 1868 Echuca, Australia
  • Darwin, W.E. [after 29 March 1868] Chester Place, …
  • Darwin, W.E. [7? April 1868] Southampton, England
  • Victoria aborigines Lubbock, E.F. [1867-8? …
  • Reade, Winwood W. [c.8 or 9 Apr 1870] Accra, West
  • to East Asia Scott, John 4 May 1868
  • India   Scott, John 2 July 1869
  • in Hottentots Smyth, R. Brough 13 Aug 1868

6430_10256

Summary

From Sven Nilsson to J. D. Hookerf1   25 October 1868Lund (Suède)25 Okt. 1868.Monsieur le Professeur! J’ai écrit à deux de mes amis qui ont des connaissances personnelles à la Lapponie, pour avoir les…

Matches: 13 hits

  • From Sven Nilsson to JDHooker f1    25 October 1868 Lund (Suède) 25 Okt1868. …
  • Lapponie, pour avoir les renseignements qua souhaitté M r . Darwin, sur les Cornes du Renne &amp
  • attendant je preds la liberté de Vous avertir ou plutôt M r . Darwin par Vous, quil se trouve
  • me semble la plus grande partie de ce que veut connaitre M r . Darwin. f4 De lautre partie j
  • Savants, il manque encore des photographies de Vous et de M r . Darwin. Quant à Vous je prends la
  • que Vous avez la bonté de me recommender chez M r . Darwin pour avoir la sienne. Je me suis
  • CDs query, see the letter to JDHooker, 19 August 1868. Hooker passed CDs query to Nilsson at
  • Europe during the Stone Age (Nilsson 1868); see letter to John Lubbock, 15 February [1868] and n10
  • knowledge of Lapland, to obtain the information that M r . Darwin wanted about Reindeer Antlers
  • I shall take the liberty of advising you or rather M r . Darwin through you, that a description of
  • one can read, it seems to me, the major part of what M r . Darwin wants to know. f4 Regarding
  • Europe during the Stone Age (Nilsson 1868); see letter to John Lubbock, 15 February [1868] and n10
  • reindeer Name correspondents Darwin, C. R. Nilsson, Sven Place

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] …
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., [30 January 1868] Darwin asks Thomas Huxley to
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • pig and her nieces ears. Letter 8701 - Lubbock, E. F . to Darwin, [1873] …
  • 6453 - Langton, E. to Wedgwood, S. E., [9 November 1868] Darwins nephew, Edmund, …
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John Scott responds to Darwins queries
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • …  - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] John Weir describes experiments he is undertaking
  • garden ”. Letter 6083  - Casparay, J. X. R. to Darwin, [2 April 1868] …
  • J., [5 April 1859] Darwin asks his publisher, John Murray, to forward a manuscript copy of
  • Letter 7858 - Darwin to Wa llace, A. R., [12 July 1871] Darwin tells Wallace that
  • writing. Letter 3001  - Darwin to Lubbock, J., [28 November 1860] Darwin
  • …  - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] John Weir describes experiments he is undertaking

5935_4582

Summary

From J. D. Hooker   26[–7] February 1868KewFeby 26th/68Dear Darwin I have been bursting with impatience to hear what you would say of the Athenæum Review & who wrote it— I could not conceive who…

Matches: 8 hits

  • From JDHooker   26[–7] February 1868 Kew Feby 26 th /68 Dear Darwin
  • hascovered itself with infamy”.— The GCarticle is weak, wateryIt is hard to decide
  • in 100 can follow it I am sure. Spencer, Huxley & Lubbock (if he has time) may f6    I have
  • i.ewhere furthest removed from the action of light air &c, (as Spermatic cells) or in the most
  • to Richard Owen (see letter to JDHooker, 23 February [1868]); the review was by John Robertson ( …
  • 1867) was reviewed in the Athenæum , 8 February 1868, pp21718. f3 CD had discussed
  • CDs reply. See letter to JDHooker, 28 February [1868] and nn810. …
  • Letter details From Hooker, J. D. To Darwin, C. R. Sent from Kew

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … activities for building and maintaining such connections. Darwin's networks extended from his …
  • … when strong institutional structures were largely absent. Darwin had a small circle of scientific …
  • … section contains two sets of letters. The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. …
  • Darwin and Gray Letter 1674 — Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 25 Apr [1855] Darwin …
  • … Mentors Darwin's close relationship with John Stevens Henslow, the professor of botany …
  • … he mentored. The first is between Darwin and his neighbour, John Lubbock and the second is between …
  • … Letter 1585 — Darwin, C. R. to Lubbock, John, [Sept 1854] Darwin sends Lubbock a beetle he …
  • … Letter 1720 — Darwin, C. R. to Lubbock, John, 19 [July 1855] Darwin congratulates Lubbock on …
  • … Letter 1979 — Darwin, C. R. to Lubbock, John, 27 Oct [1856] Darwin provides detailed …
  • … Letter 5770 — Müller, H. L. H. to Darwin, C. R., Jan [1868] Müller thanks Darwin for his …
  • … expert William Bernard Tegetmeier and the Scottish gardener John Scott, illustrate how the rigid …
  • … him to publish in his journal. The debate about John Scott Letter 3800 — …

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 26 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • on a paper on  Verbascum (mullein) by CDs protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. …
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of
  • also a serious dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and Charles Lyell . These
  • Appendix II). In May, he invited a new doctor, John Chapman, to Down and began a course of Chapmans
  • Variation . In March Darwin wrote to his publisher, John Murray, ‘Of present book I have 7
  • forward, except the last & concluding one’ ( letter to John Murray, 31 March [1865] ). In
  • will be ready for the press in the autumn’ ( letter to John Murray, 4 April [1865] ). In early
  • … ‘I am never idle when I can do anything’ ( letter to John Murray, 2 June [1865] ). It was not
  • illness and delay, the book was not published until January 1868. 'Climbing plants' …
  • Darwin had received a copy of Müllers bookFür Darwin , a study of the Crustacea with reference
  • questions and suggesting new lines of research. John Scott A similar, though not so
  • effort took place in the beginning of the year when John Scott, a protégé of Darwins whom Darwin
  • varieties (see  Correspondence  vol. 10, letter to John Scott, 19 November [1862] ). Darwin had
  • in 1863 (see Correspondence  vol. 11, letter from John Scott, 21 September [1863] ), and wrote
  • … … inheritance, reversion, effects of use & disuse &c’, and which he intended to publish in
  • manuscript was published as chapter 27 of  Variation  in 1868. The wider debate
  • the end of May, the dispute between Charles Lyell and John Lubbock over alleged plagiarism by
  • in Correspondence vol. 13, Appendix V. In 1865, Lubbock published  Prehistoric times , …
  • He wrote to Hooker, ‘I doubt whether you or I or any one c d  do any good in healing this breach. …
  • Hookers behalf, ‘He asks if you saw the article of M r . Croll in the last Reader on the
  • … ‘As for your thinking that you do not deserve the C[opley] Medal,’ he rebuked Hooker, ‘that I

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 19 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now
  • of scientific admirers at Down, among them Robert Caspary, John Traherne Moggridge, and Ernst
  • …  ( Variation ). Although it was not published until 1868, all but the concluding chapter of the
  • regime led to Darwins being teased by his neighbour, John Lubbock, about the prospect of riding to
  • with our beagles before the season is over’ ( letter from John Lubbock, 4 August 1866 ). More
  • D. Hooker, 24 December [1866] ). When finally published in 1868, it filled two lengthy volumes, …
  • On 21 February Darwin received notification from John Murray that stocks of the third edition of  …
  • Henry Walter Batess article on mimetic butterflies, Lubbocks observations of diving Hymenoptera
  • you go on, after the startling apparition of your face at R.S. Soirèewhich I dreamed of 2 nights
  • George Henslow, the son of his Cambridge mentor, John Stevens Henslow, stayed for two days in April
  • In June, Darwin was visited by the orchid specialist John Traherne Moggridge, whose work on the self
  • so you are in for it’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [  c . 10 May 1866] ). Henriettas
  • teleological development ( see for example, letter to C. W. Nägeli, 12 June [1866] ). Also in
  • common broom ( Cytisus scoparius ) and the white broom ( C. multiflorus ) in his botanical
  • and June on the subject of  Rhamnus catharticus  (now  R. cathartica ). Darwin had become
  • of separate sexes. William gathered numerous specimens of  R. catharticus , the only species of  …
  • replied with a modified list, adding Fritz Müllers  Für Darwin , and a recent fossil discovery in
  • selection, and with special creation ( letter from W. R. Grove, 31 August 1866 ). Hooker later
  • indeed at poor Susans loneliness’ ( letter from E. C. Langton to Emma and Charles Darwin, [6 and 7

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 26 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters
  • am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • letter-writing dwindled considerably. The correspondence and Darwins scientific work diminished
  • of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • to mans place in nature  both had a direct bearing on Darwins species theory and on the problem
  • detailed anatomical similarities between humans and apes, Darwin was full of praise. He especially
  • in expressing any judgment on Species or origin of man’. Darwins concern about the popular
  • Lyells and Huxleys books. Three years earlier Darwin had predicted that Lyells forthcoming
  • first half of 1863 focused attention even more closely on Darwins arguments for species change. …
  • sentence from the second edition of  Antiquity of man  (C. Lyell 1863b, p. 469), published in
  • were himself, Hooker, Huxley, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Lubbock. Honours abroad
  • of the Royal Society ( see letter from Edward Sabine to John Phillips, 12 November 1863 ). …
  • year with the Hertfordshire nurseryman Thomas Rivers. John Scott Darwin had found a
  • of hybridity and sterility at the end of the previous year. John Scott, a gardener at the Royal
  • Primula  crosses, the results of which were published in 1868 ( see letter to John Scott, 25 and
  • hoped would counteract Huxleys criticism ( letter from John Scott, 23 July [1863] ). Darwin
  • Darwin had also encouraged him to write ( see letter to John Scott, 12 April [1863] ). In this
  • that your paper will have permanent value’ ( letter to John Scott, 31 May [1863] ). Scott received
  • theOriginis not at all palatable!’ ( letter from John Scott, [3 June 1863] ). Darwins
  • a position offered in Darjeeling, India ( see letter from John Scott, 22 May 1863 , and letter
  • 1860; it continued to capture his attention ( see letter to John Scott, 12 April [1863] ). …
  • months. However, the two-volume work was not published until 1868. Roping in the family
  • very slowly recovering, but am very weak’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [29 September? 1863] ). …
  • Thomass Hospital, London ( letter from George Busk, [ c. 27 August 1863] ). Brinton, who

Darwin and the Church

Summary

The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It shows another side of the man who is more often remembered for his personal struggles with faith, or for his role in large-scale controversies over the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • The story of Charles Darwins involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It
  • unique window into this complicated relationship throughout Darwins life, as it reveals his
  • belief (and doubt) than many non-conformist denominations. Darwins parents attended a Unitarian
  • the necessary studies to be a clergyman. During Darwins lifetime, the vast majority of the
  • income was essential to enjoy a gentlemanly lifestyle. For Darwin, who could rely on the financial
  • compatible with the pursuit of scientific interests. Indeed, Darwins Cambridge mentorJohn Stevens
  • … (Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine (1887): 321). Darwin started on his journey around the world
  • it even through a grove of Palms.—’ (letter to Caroline Darwin, 256 April [1832] ). Darwins
  • Museum or some other learned place’ (letter from E. A. Darwin, 18 August [1832] ). Writing to Fox
  • the work of Non-conformist preachers in the village. John Brodie Innes Many of the
  • Innes, [8 May 1848] and n. 2). Darwin praised Innes to John William Lubbock, the principal
  • a cow and a red deer (letter from J. B. Innes, 7 December 1868 ). Innes had a tendency to tease
  • he left behind (letter from S. J. OH. Horsman, 2 June [1868] ). Among the reasons justifying his
  • the churchs organ fund (letter to J. B. Innes, 15 June [1868] ). So embroiled in this process
  • clergyman was unsuitable for entirely different reasonsJohn Warburton Robinson seemed not to be an
  • the Down parish church (letter to J. B. Innes, 1 December 1868 ). Darwin wrote of the next
  • Innes informed Darwin that though heheard all good of M r . Ffindens moral character, his
  • to such strained relations that Darwins neighbour, John Lubbock, was forced to send a series of
  • an interesting letter from Darwin to the evangelist J. W. C. Fegan. Darwin whole-heartedly supported
  • chapter . Edited by Francis Darwin. 3 vols. London: John Murray. 18878. Moore, James. 1985. …

Religion

Summary

Design|Personal Belief|Beauty|The Church Perhaps the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same can be said of the evolution controversy today; however the nature of the disputes and the manner in…

Matches: 15 hits

  • … the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same …
  • … nineteenth century were different in important ways. Many of Darwin's leading supporters were …
  • … their religious beliefs with evolutionary theory. Darwin's own writing, both in print and …
  • … much as possible. A number of correspondents tried to draw Darwin out on his own religious views, …
  • … political contexts. Design Darwin was not the first to challenge …
  • … on the controversial topic of design. The first is between Darwin and Harvard botanist Asa Gray, …
  • … Origin . The second is a single letter from naturalist A. R. Wallace to Darwin on design and …
  • Darwin and Gray Letter 2814 — Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 22 May [1860] Darwin …
  • … questions about design. Letter 6167 — Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 8 May [1868] …
  • Darwin and Wallace Letter 5140 — Wallace, A. R. to Darwin, C. R., 2 July 1866 …
  • Darwin and Graham Letter 13230 — Darwin, C. R. to Graham, William, 3 July 1881 …
  • … Letter 12041 — Darwin, C. R. to Fordyce, John, 7 May 1879 In this letter marked “private”, …
  • … R. to Down School Board, [Nov–Dec 1873] Darwin, Sir John Lubbock, Ellen Frances Lubbock, and S. …
  • … 6223 — Horsman, S. J. H. to Darwin, C. R., 2 June [1868] Horsman attempts to convince Darwin …
  • … vicar of Down is concerned about the rumours regarding John Robinson [curate of Down]. He will seek …

Darwin in letters,1870: Human evolution

Summary

The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the year at work on the Descent of Man & Selection in relation to Sex’.  Descent was the culmination of over three decades of observations and reflections on…

Matches: 23 hits

  • The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the
  • in relation to Sex’. Always precise in his accounting, Darwin reckoned that he had started writing
  • gathered on each of these topics was far more extensive than Darwin had anticipated. As a result,  …
  • and St George Jackson Mivart, and heated debates sparked by Darwins proposed election to the French
  • Finishing Descent; postponing Expression Darwin began receiving proofs of some of the
  • … ( letter to Albert Günther, 13 January [1870] ). Darwin was still working hard on parts of the
  • style, the more grateful I shall be’  ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). She had
  • … , the latter when she was just eighteen years of age. Darwin clearly expected her to make a
  • have thought that I shd. turn parson?’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). Henrietta
  • so unimportant as the mind of man!’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [after 8 February 1870] ). …
  • philanthropist Frances Power Cobbe. At Cobbes suggestion, Darwin read some of Immanuel Kants  …
  • … ( letter to F. P. Cobbe, 23 March [1870?] ). Cobbe accused Darwin of smiling in his beard with
  • as animals: ears Despite Cobbes plea, most of Darwins scientific attention in 1870 was
  • fairy in Shakespeares  A midsummer nights dreamDarwin obtained a sketch of a human ear from
  • of a pointed tip projecting inward from the folded margin. Darwin, who had posed for the sculptor in
  • vol. 16, letter to J. D. Hooker, 26 November [1868] ; this volume, letter to Thomas Woolner, 10
  • muscles A more troubling anatomical feature for Darwin was the platysma myoides, a band of
  • who sent a sketch of a babys brows ( letter from L. C. Wedgwood, [5 May 1870] ). He also wrote to
  • … (in retrograde direction) naturalist’ (letter to A. R.Wallace, 26 January [1870]). …
  • the mother and foetus during pregnancy. As a case in point, John Jenner Weir described the offspring
  • also discussed recent experiments by Louis Pasteur and John Tyndall that provided evidence for the
  • a memorandum. He asked his neighbour, the naturalist John Lubbock, who was now MP for Maidstone, to
  • reference to mankind of much importance ’ ( letter to John Lubbock, 17 July 1870 ). The motion to

Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 23 hits

  • On 14 May 1856, Charles Darwin recorded in his journal that heBegan by Lyells advice  writing
  • more for the sake of priority than anything elseDarwin was reluctant to squeeze his expansive
  • Natural selection . Determined as he was to publish, Darwin nevertheless still felt cautious
  • specialist in Madeiran entomology, Thomas Vernon Wollaston. Darwin also came to rely on the caustic
  • in London. Natural Selection Not all of Darwins manuscript on species has been
  • of pigeons, poultry, and other domesticated animals. As Darwin explained to Lyell, his studies, …
  • can William Bernhard Tegetmeier continued to help Darwin acquire much of the material for
  • on domestic animals in India and elsewhere. William Darwin Fox supplied information about cats, dogs
  • mastiffs. The disparate facts were correlated and checked by Darwin, who adroitly used letters, …
  • can.’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 8 February [1857] ). Darwin also attempted to test ideas
  • garden species with their wild congeners. Many of Darwins conclusions about the variation of
  • these chapters are not extant. It seems likely that Darwin used the manuscript when compiling  The
  • light on the role that these ideas were intended to play in Darwins formal exposition. …
  • selection could not act without varieties to act upon, Darwin wanted to know where, how, and in what
  • Making the fullest possible use of his botanical friends, Darwin cross-examined them on different
  • and conditions of existence? One useful example that Darwin intended to include in his book was the
  • relatives. But a last-minute check with Hooker revealed that Darwin was mistaken: ‘You have shaved
  • acknowledged when told by his neighbour and young protégé John Lubbock that his method of
  • using a statistically valid method explained to him by Lubbock. The origin of sex Such
  • …  not a bird be killed (by hawk, lightning, apoplexy, hail &c) with seeds in crop, & it would
  • Athenæum Club. Several letters touch on the publication of John Tyndalls theory concerning the
  • phenomenon of cleavage, still unresolved in 1856, with John Phillips and entered into a useful
  • and the preparation of his manuscript ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 1 May 1857 ) seem innocuous and

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 25 hits

  • On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July
  • … … of having grown older’. This portrait, the first of Darwin with his now famous beard, had been
  • 52 hours without vomiting!! In the same month, Darwin began to consult William Jenner, …
  • prescribed a variety of antacids and purgatives, and limited Darwins fluid intake; this treatment
  • the dimorphic aquatic cut-grass  Leersia . In May, Darwin finished his paper on  Lythrum
  • he had set aside the previous summer. In October, Darwin let his friends know that on his
  • to the surgeon and naturalist Francis Trevelyan Buckland, Darwin described his symptoms in some
  • November and December were also marked by the award to Darwin of the Royal Societys Copley Medal; …
  • been unsuccessfully nominated the two previous years. As Darwin explained to his cousin William
  • oxlip ( P. elatior ), and published his results in an 1868 article (‘Illegitimate offspring of
  • of a paper by another of his orchid correspondents, John Traherne Moggridge, who in June sent him
  • of insect pollinators in 1864 and following years. John Scott again Much of Darwins
  • plight of another of Darwins fellow orchid-experimenters, John Scott. Their correspondence had been
  • five years. Scott felt that his superiors, James McNab and John Hutton Balfour, no longer treated
  • indomitable perseverance, and his knowledge’ ( letter to John Scott, 10 June 1864 ). Hooker met
  • supporton the grounds of science’ ( letter to John Scott, 9 April 1864 ), but Scott declined
  • 5 September 1864 ). Fritz Müeller sent his bookFür Darwin , and Darwin had it translated by a
  • 1864 ). A notably rambling and long letter arrived from John Beck, a Shrewsbury schoolfellow of
  • by a merciful deity for the use of humankind ( letter from John Beck, 6 October 1864 ). …
  • his brother Erasmus told him of a subscription fund for John William Colenso, bishop of Natal, South
  • but Lyell says when I read his discussion in the Elements [C. Lyell 1865] I shall recant for fifth
  • that a Neanderthal race once extended across Europe. John Lubbock mentioned his forthcoming volume
  • on intellectual &ampmoral  qualities’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 28 [May 1864] ). …
  • of the Royal Society, Edward Sabine, to the geologist John Phillips revealed Sabines fears that in
  • ever so little degree the Councils award’ ( letter to John Lubbock, 21 December [1864] ). In

Have you read the one about....

Summary

... the atheistical cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some serious - but all letters you can read here.

Matches: 1 hits

  • … ... the atheistical cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian
  • in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie