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Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwin’s letters; the full transcript presented here …
  • … For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwin’s alterations. The spelling and dates, however, …
  • … reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwin’s scientific reading, therefore, should …
  • … number (or numbers, as the case may be) on which Darwin’s entry is to be found. The bibliography …
  • … As in the main bibliography, the manuscript page number(s) are given on which the references to the …
  • … entered into the reading notebooks. For example, Darwin’s copy of the catalogue of scientific books …
  • … The description given by Francis Darwin of his father’s method of handling the scientific books and …
  • … of species. In 1876, long after this period of Darwin’s life was over, he frankly admitted: ‘When I …
  • … , p. 119). †The scientific books in Darwin’s library were catalogued in 1875, and this …
  • … that time, most were transferred for exhibition in Darwin’s study when Down House was opened to the …
  • … had kept were left to his son Bernard and then to Bernard’s son, Sir Robin Darwin, and many of these …
  • … in the Rare Books Room. The present collection of Darwin’s Library, therefore, does not include all …
  • … C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838 Stoke’s Library 1 Cambridge. Library 2 …
  • … *119: 1v.] 6 Books to be Read Humboldt’s New Spain—much about castes [A. von …
  • … 1836–47] Lawrence [W. Lawrence 1819] read Bory S t  Vincent [Bory de Saint-Vincent 1804] …
  • … [W. Falconer 1781] [DAR *119: 2v.] White’s regular gradation in man [C. White 1799 …
  • … veget. et anim: on sleep & movements of plants  £ 1 ..s  4. [Dutrochet 1837] Voyage …
  • … 1802–13]— facts about close species. Wilson’s American Ornithology [A. Wilson 1808–14] …
  • … des hommes & des Animaux by Isid. Geoffroy de S t  Hilaire 1832 [I. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire …
  • … of Brit: plants [H. C. Watson 1835] read Hume’s Essay on Human understanding [Hume 1750] …
  • … Thomson 1839] 14 th  Arnolds lectures on History [Arnold 1842] —— History of …
  • … Harris 1844].— Aug 15 th . Arnolds Rome 3. vols [Arnold 1838–43] Sept 3 d …
  • … [Carlyle 1845]. Sept 9 th  Arnolds Roman History [Arnold 1838–43] two last vols: Oct …
  • … by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • … Peacock, George. 1855.  Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21 …

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from 1875 on this website.  The full texts of the …
  • … Plants always held an important place in Darwin’s theorising about species, and botanical research …
  • … the controversy involved a slanderous attack upon Darwin’s son George, in an anonymous review in …
  • … V). Darwin remained bitter and dissatisfied with Mivart’s attempts at conciliation, and spent weeks …
  • … of London, and a secretary of the Linnean Society, Darwin’s friends had to find ways of coming to …
  • … the publisher of the Quarterly Review , in which Mivart’s anonymous essay had appeared. ‘I told …
  • … feel now like a pure forgiving Christian!’ Darwin’s ire was not fully spent, however, for he …
  • … The vivisection issue was a delicate one within Darwin’s family, and he tried to balance his concern …
  • … paper sent me by Miss Cobbe.’ Darwin found Cobbe’s memorial inflammatory and unfair in its …
  • … on 12 May, one week after a rival bill based on Cobbe’s memorial had been read in the House of Lords …
  • … on vivisection , p. 183). Darwin learned of Klein’s testimony from Huxley on 30 October 1875 : …
  • … medicine in London. Klein had assisted in some of Darwin’s botanical research and had visited Down …
  • …   Poisons, plants, and print-runs Darwin’s keen interest in the progress of physiology …
  • … of protoplasm. He added the details of Brunton and Fayrer’s experiments to Insectivorous plants , …
  • … I can say is that I am ready to commit suicide.’ Darwin’s despair over the revision process may have …
  • … ). In the event, the book sold well, and Murray’s partner, Robert Cooke, politely scolded …
  • … the most enthusiastic responses came from the Swiss botanist Arnold Dodel, an instructor at the …
  • … insects were observed in the field, and some of Darwin’s experiments on digestion were then repeated …
  • … about the same time. As was the case with some of Darwin’s previous publications, however, the …
  • … were finished. An elusive case Darwin’s attention seems to have been largely on …
  • … between the men in 1874, and this was enhanced by Romanes’s visit to Down House: ‘The place was one …
  • … remain one of the most agreeable and interesting of memory’s pictures.’ Though trained in zoology …
  • … to carry out experiments that might help confirm Darwin’s theory of heredity. ‘I am a young man yet, …
  • … Testing Pangenesis Experiments to test Darwin’s pangenesis hypothesis had been performed on …
  • … the view that characteristics acquired in an individual’s lifetime could be transmitted to offspring …