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Darwin in letters, 1882: Nothing too great or too small

Summary

In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous October, and for the first time in decades he was not working on another book. He remained active in botanical research, however. Building on his recent studies in plant…

Matches: 26 hits

  • In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous
  • for scientific colleagues or their widows facing hardship. Darwin had suffered from poor health
  • … ‘I feel a very old man, & my course is nearly run’ ( letter to Lawson Tait, 13 February 1882 ) …
  • of his scientific friends quickly organised a campaign for Darwin to have greater public recognition
  • Botanical observation and experiment had long been Darwins greatest scientific pleasure. The year
  • fertility of crosses between differently styled plants ( letter from Fritz Müller, 1 January 1882
  • contents, if immersed for some hours in a weak solution of C. of Ammonia’. Darwins interest in root
  • François Marie Glaziou (see Correspondence vol. 28, letter from Arthur de Souza Corrêa, 20
  • published. Darwin carried on with botanical work in spring. He tried to obtain cobra poison, …
  • was sounded by the American publisher, Allen Thorndike Rice: ‘This line of investigation, I am
  • our homes, would in this case greatly suffer’ ( letter to C. A. Kennard, 9 January 1882 ). Kennard
  • judged, intellectually his inferior, please ( letter from C. A. Kennard, 28 January 1882 ). …
  • to John Collier, 16 February 1882 ). Collier had married Thomas Henry Huxleys daughter Marian. He
  • to take his daily strolls (Henrietta Emma Litchfield, ‘Charles Darwins death’, DAR 262.23: 2, p. 2) …
  • dull aching in the chest’ (Emma Darwin to G. H. Darwin, [ c . 28 March 1882] (DAR 210.3: 45)). …
  • snakes, centipedes, and spiders. The instructions were from Charles Lawrence Hughes, a fellow pupil
  • to some Estancia,’ wrote Hughes, ‘as the scenery &c. will amply repay your trouble’ ( letter
  • making observations of geological uplift ( letter from Thomas Sutcliffe, [28 August5 September
  • where he had witnessed an earthquake in 1835 ( letter from R. E. Alison, [MarchJuly 1835 ]). …
  • Holland, she mentions his warm reception on arrival: ‘Charles is as well as possible & in gayer
  • recommendations for annual medals. He strongly supported Charles Lyell for the Copley, the Royal
  • that the future Historian of the Natural Sciences, will rank Lyells labours as more influential in
  • point of view I think no man ranks in the same class with Lyell’ ( letter to William Sharpey, 22
  • theory of ice dams causing glacial lakes was presented by Thomas Francis Jamieson in a paper to the
  • will be months before I am able to work’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [ c . 10 April 1864] ). To
  • of Darwins friends, Huxley, John Lubbock, and Charles Lyell, each addressed the question of human