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Darwin’s earthquakes

Summary

Darwin experienced his first earthquake in 1834, but it was a few months later that he was really confronted with their power. Travelling north along the coast of Chile, Darwin and Robert FitzRoy, captain of HMS Beagle, were confronted with a series of…

Matches: 10 hits

  • in only one little earthquake having happened Darwin to his sister Catherine, 8 November
  • with their power. Travelling north along the coast of Chile, Darwin and Robert FitzRoy, captain of
  • section of the west coast was shaken by an earthquakeDarwin was in Valdivia where the damage was
  • wreaked in the towns and villages that made an impression; Darwin and FitzRoy also noticed the small
  • of the land at Concepción had risen in altitude.   Darwin, pondering a possible connection between
  • to conceive a grand geological theory. Travelling inland, Darwin concluded that all these separate
  • shock waves from a single subterranean event. Darwin had explored the Cordilleras from the
  • violent natural events, fossilised trees and other evidence, Darwin was attempting to visualise the
  • and these are amongst the most visually striking objects of Darwins surviving papers from the
  • South America and crossing back half way round the world, Darwin started to apply this theory on a

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …
  • … Darwin, C. S. (49) Darwin, Catherine (40) …
  • … Charles (2) Langton, Catherine (40) …

Darwin on childhood

Summary

On his engagement to his cousin, Emma Wedgwood, in 1838, Darwin wrote down his recollections of his early childhood.  Life. Written August–– 1838 My earliest recollection, the date of which I can approximately tell, and which must have been before…

Matches: 6 hits

  • On his engagement to his cousinEmma Wedgwood, in 1838, Darwin wrote down his recollections of his
  • my family, who were there.–– I remember either myself or Catherine being naughty, & being shut
  • seem to be connected most closely with self.–– now Catherine seems to recollect scenes, where others
  • is sufficiently odd, this difference in subjects remembered. Catherine says she does not remember
  • After Sarahs death in 1815, it remained the residence of Catherine (Kitty) and Sarah Elizabeth
  • 5662. A modernised transcription was published by Francis Darwin in More Letters of Charles Darwin. …

Darwin’s first love

Summary

Darwin’s long marriage to Emma Wedgwood is well documented, but was there an earlier romance in his life? How was his departure on the Beagle entangled with his first love? The answers are revealed in a series of flirtatious letters that Darwin was…

Matches: 25 hits

  • Darwins long marriage to Emma Wedgwood is well documented, but was there an
  • answers are revealed in a series of flirtatious letters that Darwin was supposed to destroy. …
  • at my fury and revengeHad nineteen-year-old Darwin followed this instruction in a
  • Fanny Mostyn Owen, wrote a series of revealing letters to Darwin, giving glimpses into their
  • not know whether Fanny burnt the letters she received from Darwin, but he carefully kept the letters
  • father, William Mostyn Owen, ‘ the Governor ’. Darwin first heard about Fanny when he was an
  • The high-spirited, fun-loving Fanny, two years older than Darwin, clearly established the terms of
  • her love of the dramatic, and most of all her inclusion of Darwin in a make-believe private world, …
  • Forest  that shaped the relationship she developed with Darwin. The characters include Peter, a
  • In Fannys first letter, and in many others she wrote to Darwin, he was postilion to her housemaid, …
  • words, convey a warmth of character that was first noted by Darwins sister Catherine. After staying
  • on the social life of Brighton, she also demanded that Darwin send herShrewsbury scandal’. ‘You
  • black mysteries  after so long an absence ’. Darwin, however, did leave Shrewsbury before
  • a clergymanFannys slow response to the news of Darwins departure came with the excuse that she
  • like any thing but what  I am , a  Housemaid ’. Darwins feelings were probably more
  • he had not heard from her. Writing before the end of Darwins first Cambridge term, Fanny
  • they think, of a  Housemaid  writing to M r  Charles Darwin— &#039That summer, while away
  • …   A gift with wings At Cambridge, Darwins new-found passion for entomology
  • … ’, she declared herselfvery much obligdfor Darwins gift. The swallow tail ‘has absolutely  …
  • felt bereft when he learned in a letter from his sister Catherine, received four months later in Rio
  • grief to you, dearest Charley ’, was the only consolation Catherine could offer. ‘If Fanny was not
  • sister Sarah the previous summer. Darwins sister Catherine thought hima dissipated, gambling
  • man ’ anda tiresome person to live with. ’ Catherine remained the most sceptical. ‘Poor Fanny
  • … ‘M r Biddulph seems fond & affectionate to her,’ Catherine reported, ‘ but he is a gay
  • … , the difference between the sisters being caught by Catherine Darwin, who had observed them at a

Earthworms

Summary

As with many of Darwin’s research topics, his interest in worms spanned nearly his entire working life. Some of his earliest correspondence about earthworms was written and received in the 1830s, shortly after his return from his Beagle voyage, and his…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Earthworms and Wedgwood cousins As with many of Darwin's research topics, his
  • months before he died in March 1882. In the same way that Darwin cast a wide net when seeking
  • his nieces, Lucy and Sophy Wedgwood, the daughters of Emma Darwin's brother Josiah. Darwin
  • Scientific evidence for the history of life Darwin chose to study earthworms in order to
  • selection. His book Fertilisation of Orchids (1862) was Darwin's "flank movement
  • was a study of incredible empirical detail that demonstrates Darwin's creative experimental
  • … (be it geology or evolutionary theory) was a subject that Darwin had contemplated from his earliest
  • SOURCES Papers Darwin, C.R. 1840. On the formation of mould. Transactions of the
  • 385 - Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood & Josiah Wedgwood to Darwin, 10 November [1837] …
  • were fertilised. Letter 8137 - William Darwin to Charles Darwin, 1 January 1872
  • of stone at Stonehenge. In his reply of two days later, Darwin wrote, “Your letter & facts are
  • 8144 , 8169 , and 8171 - Between Charles Darwin and Lucy Wedgwood, January 1872
  • for her observations. Letter 12745 - Darwin to Sophy Wedgwood, 8 October 1880
  • … , 15 October 1880] Letter 13406 - Mary Catherine Stanley (Lady Derby) to Darwin, 16
  • and its significance. Letter 13632 - Darwin to John Murray, 21 January 1882 In
  • magazine, Stephen Jay Gould argues for the importance of Darwin's last book and its centrality

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 20 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now
  • and also a meeting with Herbert Spencer, who was visiting Darwins neighbour, Sir John Lubbock. In
  • all but the concluding chapter of the work was submitted by Darwin to his publisher in December. …
  • hypothesis of hereditary transmission. Debate about Darwins theory of transmutation
  • alleged evidence of a global ice age, while Asa Gray pressed Darwins American publisher for a
  • for the Advancement of Science. Fuller consideration of Darwins work was given by Hooker in an
  • frustrations were punctuated by family bereavement. Two of Darwins sisters died, Emily Catherine
  • from painful illness. Diet and exercise Among Darwins first letters in the new year
  • every day’ ( letter to H. B. Jones, 3 January [1866] ). Darwin had first consulted Jones in July
  • … ( letter from H. B. Jones, 10 February [1866] ). Darwin began riding the cob, Tommy, on 4
  • day which I enjoy much.’ The new exercise regime led to Darwins being teased by his neighbour, John
  • John Lubbock, 4 August 1866 ). More predictably, however, Darwin immediately converted his renewed
  • Since the publication of  Origin  in November 1859, Darwin had continued gathering and organising
  • by natural selection was based. The work relied heavily on Darwins extensive correspondence over
  • and poultry expert William Bernhard Tegetmeier. In January, Darwin wrote to Tegetmeier that he was
  • … ( letter to W. B. Tegetmeier, 16 January [1866] ). Darwin found the evidence of variation in
  • varieties from  Columbia livia , the rock pigeon. Darwin on heredity: the 'provisional
  • chapter headedProvisional hypothesis of pangenesis’, Darwin proposed that the various phenomena of
  • provoking sombre thoughts. Darwins younger sister Emily Catherine Langton died in February, and his
  • in Shrewsbury after their fathers death in 1848 until Catherine married in 1863. Catherine had

Darwin and Fatherhood

Summary

Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten children. It is often assumed that Darwin was an exceptional Victorian father. But how extraordinary was he? The Correspondence Project allows an unusually…

Matches: 14 hits

  • Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten
  • an unusually large number of letters sent by members of the Darwin family to be studied. However, in
  • required them to work long hours away from their family. Darwin was unusual in being able to pursue
  • this part of Kent asextraordinarily rural & quiet’ (Darwin to his sister Catherine,  [24 July
  • left their children in the care of servants in the country. Darwin frequently expressed regrets that
  • meetings and social events in the capital. As a result, Darwin rarely spent a day without the
  • … ‘visitsto see their father when he was working (Darwin to his wife Emma,  [7-8 February 1845] ). …
  • childrens development in diaries and letters. However, Darwin was unusual for the systematic
  • was far more typical of mid-nineteenth-century fathers was Darwins intense involvement in his
  • to incessant anxiety & movement on account of Etty.’ (Darwin to W. D. Fox18 October [1860] …
  • who did not have specialist scientific or medical interests. Darwin expressed enduring grief
  • terribly anxious, but fear has almost driven away grief.’ (Darwin to W. D. Fox2 July [1858] ). …
  • after her birth in 1842 had a far more limited impact on Darwin. However, the intensity of grief
  • in a profession were a substantial drain on family finances. Darwin wrote about theawesome state

About Darwin

Summary

To many of us, Darwin’s name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural selection.  But even before the publication of On the Origin of Species in 1859, he was publicly known through his popular book about the voyage of the Beagle, and he was…

Matches: 16 hits

  • To many of us, Darwins name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural
  • of his careerOrigin  was the point of departure for Darwins important works on variation, …
  • of religion. Born on 12 February 1809, Charles Darwin was the son of two noteworthy families. …
  • renowned physician, poet, and natural philosopher Erasmus DarwinCharles grew up in Shrewsbury
  • an older brotherErasmus Alvey Darwin, and a younger sisterCatherineTheir mother died in 1817, …
  • cousin Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and they had ten childrenDarwin spent most of his life working from
  • by serving as research subjects themselves).  The depth of Darwins affection for his children is
  • the Cambridge professor of botanyJohn Stevens Henslow, Darwin was offered the chance to travel
  • to this five-year journey, which began when he was just 22, Darwin wrote, 'The voyage of the
  • my whole career.&#039While circumnavigating the globe, Darwin remained in constant contact with
  • life at seaBy the time he returned to England in 1836, Darwin had unearthed enormous mammalian
  • and plants that fuelled much of his later work. Darwins achievements during the voyage
  • heroes, the geologist Charles LyellThe six years Darwin lived in London were among the most
  • urged him to publish his views on evolution in 1858, when Darwin learned by letter that Alfred
  • specimens in the Malay Archipelago.  At home in Downe, Darwin spent the last two decades of his life
  • of the most renowned names in Victorian BritainDarwin died in April 1882; he was buried in

About Darwin

Summary

To many of us, Darwin’s name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural selection.  But even before the publication of On the Origin of Species in 1859, he was publicly known through his popular book about the voyage of the Beagle, and he was…

Matches: 16 hits

  • To many of us, Darwins name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural
  • of his career, the Origin was the point of departure for Darwins important works on variation, …
  • of religion. Born on 12 February 1809, Charles Darwin was the son of two noteworthy families. …
  • renowned physician, poet, and natural philosopher Erasmus DarwinCharles grew up in Shrewsbury
  • an older brotherErasmus Alvey Darwin, and a younger sisterCatherineTheir mother died in 1817, …
  • cousin Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and they had ten childrenDarwin spent most of his life working from
  • by serving as research subjects themselves).  The depth of Darwins affection for his children is
  • the Cambridge professor of botanyJohn Stevens Henslow, Darwin was offered the chance to travel
  • to this five-year journey, which began when he was just 22, Darwin wrote, “The voyage of the Beagle
  • my whole career.”  While circumnavigating the globe, Darwin remained in constant contact with
  • life at seaBy the time he returned to England in 1836, Darwin had unearthed enormous mammalian
  • and plants that fuelled much of his later work. Darwins achievements during the voyage
  • heroes, the geologist Charles LyellThe six years Darwin lived in London were among the most
  • urged him to publish his views on evolution in 1858, when Darwin learned by letter that Alfred
  • specimens in the Malay Archipelago.  At home in Downe, Darwin spent the last two decades of his life
  • him one of the most renowned names in Victorian BritainDarwin died in April 1882; he was buried

Charles Darwin born

Summary

Charles Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, the fifth of six children of Robert Waring Darwin, a doctor, and his wife Susannah, daughter of Josiah Wedgwood I.

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Charles Darwin was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire, the fifth of six children of Robert Waring Darwin …

Journal of researches

Summary

Within two months of the Beagle’s arrival back in England in October 1836, Darwin, although busy with distributing his specimens among specialists for description, and more interested in working on his geological research, turned his mind to the task of…

Matches: 22 hits

  • The Journal of researches , Darwins account of his travels round the world in H.M.S. Beagle , …
  • The circumstances of its publication were not shaped by Darwin, however, but by the Beagles
  • of the globe , with the title Journal and remarks . Darwins volume was soon issued separately
  • of the Beagle , although this title was never used in Darwins lifetime. Conception
  • form the basis of his publicationAfter Henry Holland, Darwins second cousin, pointed out there
  • confessed, ‘ but I found no part of yours tedious ’. Darwins sister Catherine also reported that
  • to criticize ’. By the end of 1836, the matter of whether Darwins journal would form a separate
  • the narrative be divided into three volumes with one for Darwin alone, and theprofits if
  • cut out too much for fear it would becomedryer ’. Darwins revisions did not involve only
  • the hodge-podge complete .’ Shortly after this, Darwin outlined the same plan to his
  • information from others. ‘I have been going steadily,’ Darwin told Henslow, ‘and have already made a
  • will much add to the value of the whole .’ By July 1837, Darwin had finished the draft of his book
  • work, cramming up learning to ornament my journal with ’. Darwins methods for acquiring
  • of activity had been spurred by assurances in May 1837 that Darwins volume wouldbegin to print in
  • … ‘ not be published till November 1 st . ’ By 18 May, Darwin was workingvery steadily’, but
  • at the workhis progress was slow ’. Nonetheless, Darwin kept to the schedule, even though the
  • Since books were sent to the printer in sections, Darwin still had a few days to complete later
  • with the thistles, which will go a few days afterwards ’. Darwin also warned Henslow that he hoped
  • was something he wasbound to doas he had sent Darwin out on the voyage. If Darwin found
  • late August, as the proof sheets began totumble in’, Darwins view was confirmed and he foresaw
  • America provided by the naturalist John Richardson, but Darwin did notsucceed in burying the
  • all work & go and live in the country, for a few weeks ’, Darwin moaned to Henslow, who had

Darwin and Down

Summary

Charles and Emma Darwin, with their first two children, settled at Down House in the village of Down (later ‘Downe’) in Kent, as a young family in 1842.   The house came with eighteen acres of land, and a fifteen acre meadow.  The village combined the…

Matches: 8 hits

  • think London is only 16 miles off.— To E. C. Darwin,  [24 July 1842] Charles
  • village combined the benefits of rural surroundings, where Darwin could make observations and
  • of access to London, and was the environment within which Darwins work over the last forty years of
  • circular sandwalk, all contributed at one time or another to Darwins researchThe countryside
  • from his letters and papers remain largely as they were in Darwin's lifetime, and comparisons
  • by English Heritage to reflect their state shortly before Darwins death. Selected letters: …
  • On the house and surroundings: To his sister, Catherine Darwin,  [24 July 1842] To
  • for existence: To J. D. Hooker5 June [1855] : Darwin describes the systematic collection

Orundellico (Jemmy Button)

Summary

Orundellico was one of the Yahgan, or canoe people of the southern part of Tierra del Fuego.  He was the fourth hostage taken by Robert FitzRoy, captain of HMS Beagle, in 1830 following the theft of the small surveying boat. This fourteen-year old boy was…

Matches: 4 hits

  • as a member of a seafaring people, he could not understand Darwins seasickness, he would often
  • contain his feelings at seeing the alteration in Jemmy, and Darwin lamentedso complete and
  • joined the captains table for dinner, and, according to Darwin, wasvery happy, did not wish to
  • with the Yamana people of Cape Horn, before and after Darwin.  Cambridge: Cambridge University

Race, Civilization, and Progress

Summary

Darwin's first reflections on human progress were prompted by his experiences in the slave-owning colony of Brazil, and by his encounters with the Yahgan peoples of Tierra del Fuego. Harsh conditions, privation, poor climate, bondage and servitude,…

Matches: 26 hits

  • Letters | Selected Readings Darwin's first reflections on human progress were
  • human progress or cause degeneration. In the "Fuegians", Darwin thought he had witnessed
  • several years earlier as part of a missionary enterprise. Darwin was struck by the progress that had
  • been returned to their native land. After the voyage, Darwin began to question the
  • After the publication of Origin of Species , many of Darwin's supporters continued to
  • or extermination of other peoples and cultures. When Darwin wrote about the human races and
  • on human and animal behavior accumulated over three decades. Darwin argued forcefully for the unity
  • and beyond. Letters Darwins first observations of the peoples
  • Cambridge, John Stevens Henslow. Letter 204 : Darwin to Henslow, J. S., 11 April 1833
  • wildness." Charles wrote to his sister, Emily Catherine Darwin, about witnessing
  • effect in the following year. Letter 206 : Darwin to Darwin, E. C., 22 May [– 14 July] …
  • descent. Letter 4933 : Farrar, F. W. to Darwin, 6 November 1865 "so
  • this a very strong argument for the Polygenist?" Darwin asked the English settler
  • of replies from the South African native, Christian Gaika. Darwin was impressed by Gaika's
  • of civilization of the natives. Letter 5617 , Darwin to Weale, J. P. M., 27 August
  • civilization" Letter 5722 , Weale, J. P. M. to Darwin, [10 December 1867] …
  • Just prior to the publication of Origin of Species , Darwin discussed his views on progress in a
  • structure. This remained a point of dispute between many of Darwins scientific supporters, …
  • Alpheus Hyatt. In the last edition of Origin (1872), Darwin tried to clarify his position: &quot
  • … ( Origin , 6 th ed, p. 98). Letter 2503 : Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, C., 11 October
  • which I have briefly discussed in the Origin." Darwin discussed the role of
  • the philosopher William Graham. Letter 2503 : Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, C., 11 October
  • races being exterminated." Letter 3439 : Darwin to Kingsley, Charles, 6 February
  • a unit, will have risen in rank." Letter 4510 : Darwin to Wallace, A. R., 28 [May
  • … & moral qualities. Letter 13230 : Darwin to Graham, William, 3 July 1881
  • Selected Readings Primary Charles Darwin, Notebooks, B 18-29; E 95-7 [ …

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 14 hits

  • activities for building and maintaining such connections. Darwin's networks extended from his
  • when strong institutional structures were largely absent. Darwin had a small circle of scientific
  • section contains two sets of letters. The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. …
  • about Hookers thoughts. Letter 729Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., [11 Jan 1844] …
  • is like confessing a murder”. Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 23 Feb [1844
  • of wide-ranging species to wide-ranging genera. Darwin and Gray Letter 1674
  • of the species. Letter 1685Gray, Asa to Darwin, C. R., 22 May 1855 Gray
  • of alpine flora in the USA. Letter 2125Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 20 July [1857] …
  • have in simple truth been of the utmost value to me.” Darwin believes species have arisen, like
  • or continuous area; they are actual lineal descendants. Darwin discusses fertilisation in the bud
  • exchange This collection of letters between Darwin and Hooker, while Darwin was writing his
  • to information exchange. Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] …
  • followed automatically. On the issue of nomenclature reform, Darwin opposes appending first
  • He reports on his fathers health, as well as sister Catherines and his own. He also notes that

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 23 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • editorsidentification of the book or article to which Darwin refers. A full list of these works is
  • page number (or numbers, as the case may be) on which Darwins entry is to be found. The
  • in the bibliography that other editions were available to Darwin. While it is likely that Darwin
  • where we are not certain that the work cited is the one Darwin intended, we have prefixed the
  • mark. Complete or partial runs of journals which Darwin recorded as having read or skimmed
  • to the journal appear, and the location of abstracts in the Darwin archive and journals included in
  • no means a complete representation of the books and journals Darwin read. The Darwin archive
  • are not found listed here. The description given by Francis Darwin of his fathers method of
  • number and the general orientation of the works upon which Darwin drew, particularly in the process
  • Fellows Lycia (1 st  Travels) [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins
  • to Khiva  (James Abbott 1843). 48  Emily Catherine Darwin. 49  Almost
  • list of the books read by CD (DAR 120), which was begun by Catherine Darwin and continued by CD. …
  • … . 2 vols. London. [Other eds.]  119: 8a Gore, Catherine Grace Frances. 1838The rose
  • … . 2 vols. London. [Other eds.]  119: 22b [Marsh, Catherine M.]. 1858English hearts and
  • …   Franklin . London119: 23b [Spence, Catherine Ellen]. 1856Tender and true. A   …

Darwin & coral reefs

Summary

The central idea of Darwin's theory of coral reef formation, as it was later formulated, was that the islands were formed by the upward growth of coral as the Pacific Ocean floor gradually subsided. It overturned previous ideas and would in itself…

Matches: 20 hits

  • formation of barrier-reefs and atolls. Charles Darwin describing how he arrived at his
  • notes on geological observations that survive from the time Darwin spent on the west coast of South
  • which, though fragmentary and indirect, give evidence that Darwin had the main points of the theory
  • A letter from Robert Edward Alison, who had assisted Darwin in his observations on the elevation of
  • before leaving for the Galapagos early in September, Darwin jotted down some notes about coral
  • medium is ink, which indicates that the notes were made when Darwin was in residence ashore or on
  • which is concerned with subjects of primary interest to Darwin during his time in Chile: crustal
  • these notes on global crustal changes strongly suggests that Darwins theory of coral reef formation
  • at the time: the elevation of the South American continent. Darwin had by that time become a
  • of the elevation of South America. Paradoxically, Darwins adoption of the principle of
  • far too deep for reef-building corals to grow. Darwin was certainly familiar with Lyells
  • 32 coral islands, and the Frenchmen Quoy and GaimardAs Darwin wrote to his sister Catherine, …
  • rapidly growing in Low islands’. From his reading Darwin must also have been aware that his
  • Stoddart 1962,  DAR 41: 22a.] The impact of Darwins first sighting of a coral island
  • to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands of the Indian Ocean. What Darwin saw there strengthened his
  • a monstrous hypothesis.’ While at Cocos (Keeling) Darwin wrote an entry in his diary that
  • …   Shortly after returning to England, Darwin told Lyell of his theory. Lyell was immediately
  • … (Wilson 1972, p. 449). At Lyells urging, Darwin read a paper on his coral theory before the
  • of feet.   Selected letters: Darwin tells his sister Susan that has told
  • 1831] . The first evidence of ideas that led to Darwins theory of coral reef formation: A

Darwin’s hothouse and lists of hothouse plants

Summary

Darwin became increasingly involved in botanical experiments in the years after the publication of Origin. The building of a small hothouse - a heated greenhouse - early in 1863  greatly increased the range of plants that he could keep for scientific…

Matches: 24 hits

  • Towards the end of 1862, Darwin resolved to build a small hothouse at Down House, forexperimental
  • hothouse early in 1863 marked something of a milestone in Darwins botanical work, since it greatly
  • …  vol5, letter to JD. Hooker, 19 April [1855] ). Darwin became increasingly involved in
  • Though his greenhouse was probably heated to some extent, Darwin found himself on several occasions
  • make observations and even experiments on his behalf. Darwins decision to build a hothouse
  • Hooker, 12 [December 1862] and n13). Initially, Darwin purchased for this purpose a glass
  • of 24 December [1862] ( Correspondence  vol10) Darwin told Hooker: I have
  • Encyclopedia of gardening  (Loudon 1835), a copy of which Darwin signed in 1841 (see the copy in
  • of heat’ (p1100). The latter was the sense in which Darwin used the word. The building of
  • accounts (Down House MS)). When it was completed, Darwin told Turnbull that without Horwoods aid he
  • … ). Even before work on the hothouse started, however, Darwin began making preparations to
  • plants’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] ). Darwin apparently refers to the catalogues
  • whom he had dealt over many years. In his letter to Hooker, Darwin mentioned that he hoped to be
  • … (letter from JD. Hooker, [15 January 1863] ). Darwin agreed to send Hooker his list of
  • … (letter to JD. Hooker, 30 January [1863] ). Darwin probably gave his list of plants to
  • … [1863] ). On 20 February, the plants from Kew had arrived. Darwin was delighted, telling Hooker: ‘I
  • moss, peat, and charcoal (see the letter from Henrietta Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [22
  • … (see letter from JD. Hooker, [6 March 1863] ). Darwin derived enormous pleasure from his
  • … (letter to JD. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] ). Darwins aesthetic appreciation of the
  • the tropics. Even before he left on the Beagle  voyage, Darwin used the hothouses in the
  • … (see  Correspondence  vol1, letter to Caroline Darwin, [28 April 1831] ), and when, on the  …
  • old friends again’ ( Correspondence  vol1, letter to Catherine Darwin, MayJune [1832] ). …
  • 8 October [1845] ). Having indulged his senses, Darwin soon began the more serious work of
  • department at Kew, had helped select the plants for Darwin). Hooker had also sent seeds, and was

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 20 hits

  • Charles Darwins observations on the development of his children,[1began the
  • is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the
  • lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on
  • the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwins notes reveals, he closely
  • William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting