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Darwin's health

Summary

On 28 March 1849, ten years before Origin was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker from Great Malvern in Worcestershire, where Dr James Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to…

Matches: 19 hits

  • On 28 March 1849, ten years before  Origin  was published, Darwin wrote to his good
  • Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to Hookers letter which he put down to his exceptionally
  • I was rapidly going the way of all fleshSee the letter At various periods in his
  • headaches, fatigue, trembling, faintness, and dizziness. In 1849, Darwins symptoms became so severe
  • certain that the Water Cure is no quackery.—  See the letter After returning from
  • in the years around 1848, 1852, 1859, and 1863. In a letter to Hooker in April of 1861for example, …
  • of his critically ill  ‘master & friendJohn Stevens Henslow. Darwin was sure the journey from
  • as my retching is apt to be extremely loud.—  See the letter Besides experimenting
  • 1864, Darwin attributed his improved health to Dr Jenners advice: ‘ drinking very littleenormous
  • the vomiting wonderfully & I am gaining vigour .’ (letter to JDHooker, 13 April [1864] ) …
  • these grounds (see, for example, Correspondence vol. 2, letter to J. S. Henslow, 14 October
  • health diary (Down House MS), which he kept between 1 July 1849 and 16 January 1855, describes
  • vol. 2). He suffered from persistent sickness in 1849, describingincessant vomitingin his letter
  • decision to consult John Chapman.  In a letter to J. D. Hooker, [20-] 22 February [1864] ( …
  • 1995, pp. 428-9. On his difficulties reading, see letters to J. D. Hooker, 1 June [1865] and
  • discussed in Colp 1977, pp. 31-2, 47, 98. In his letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 March [1863] ( …
  • also Correspondence vol. 12, letter from Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1864] . …
  • Correspondence vol. 4, letter to W. D. Fox, 24 [March 1849] , and Correspondence vol. 7, …
  • where he and his family spent three months in March 1849 (see Correspondence vol. 4). He also

Darwin in letters, 1847-1850: Microscopes and barnacles

Summary

Darwin's study of barnacles, begun in 1844, took him eight years to complete. The correspondence reveals how his interest in a species found during the Beagle voyage developed into an investigation of the comparative anatomy of other cirripedes and…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … Light is shed on the close relationship between Darwin’s systematic descriptive work and the species …
  • … it is evident from his correspondence that Darwin’s two hours at the microscope did not preclude a …
  • … and Daniel Sharpe, demonstrating the extent of Darwin’s continued involvement in contemporary …
  • … the midst of all this activity, Hooker responds to Darwin’s particular queries and sends information …
  • … Geology, and geological controversy Hooker’s letters illuminate the role of the British …
  • … of an Admiralty  Manual of scientific enquiry  (1849) designed to guide the scientific work of …
  • … William Herschel, to write the chapter on geology ( letter to J. F. W. Herschel, 4 February [1848] …
  • … by Darwin on the use of microscopes on board ship ( see letter to Richard Owen, [26 March 1848] ). …
  • … to Milne directly, he sent a long rejoinder in the form of a letter for publication in the Scotsman. …
  • … asked for it to be destroyed. Only the draft of Darwin’s letter remains ( letter to the  Scotsman …
  • … that his original fieldwork was ‘time thrown away’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 8 [September 1847] ) …
  • … that it would be a ‘thorn in the side of É de B.’ (letter to Charles Lyell, 3 January 1850 ). …
  • … that such a monograph was a ‘desideratum’ ( letter to J. L. R. Agassiz, 22 October 1848 ), was …
  • … or pistils ( Correspondence  vol. 2, letter from J. S. Henslow, 21 November 1840 ). The sexual …
  • … you say, my species theory is all gospel.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 10 May 1848 ). Once …
  • … for the Advancement of Science in Birmingham in September 1849. At Birmingham, Darwin made …
  • … of expedience ( letter to H. E. Strickland, [4 February 1849] ), but in the end he adhered to the …
  • … History’ ( letter to H. E. Strickland, 29 January [1849] ). He also wrote a paper, which he sent …
  • … with Darwin’s letter to H. E. Strickland, 29 January [1849] . As Darwin wrote to J. D. Hooker, …
  • … fatigue and ill health ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 April 1849 ). Health and wealth …
  • … 1847 and during the last half of 1848 and the beginning of 1849. When his father Robert Waring died …
  • … to Down in June, is the subject of several letters in 1849. Darwin was convinced that it was a …

1.3 Thomas Herbert Maguire, lithograph

Summary

< Back to Introduction This striking portrait of Darwin, dating from 1849, belonged to a series of about sixty lithographic portraits of naturalists and other scientists drawn by Thomas Herbert Maguire. They were successively commissioned over a…

Matches: 17 hits

  • This striking portrait of Darwin, dating from 1849, belonged to a series of about sixty lithographic
  • science through the exhibits, and also through the museums library and lectures or classes held
  • natural history among the working classes’. The museums ethos was strongly religious and supportive
  • as its first president, and his friend Revd John Stevens HenslowDarwins Cambridge mentoras
  • embarrassment or difficulty on religious grounds. In return, Henslow persuaded Ransome to give
  • including Murchison, Yarrell, Gould, and Jardine as well as Henslow and Kirby. According to a report
  • prove most ungrateful if it does not second Mr Ransomes benevolent intentions by speedily carrying
  • Science, he was instrumental in securing the Associations decision to hold its July 1851 meeting in
  • celebrations, he too became a patron of the Museum, and Henslow presented him with a bound set of
  • photographic prints. Darwin thought that the portrait of Henslow wasvery like, but I am not quite
  • self-conscious and awkward in his pose. Darwin told Henslow, ‘My wife says she never saw me with the
  • and dated in the image, bottom right, ‘T.H. Maguire, 1849’. 
 date of creation 1849 
 …
  • … ‘Our weekly gossip’, Athenaeum , no. 1141 (8 Sept. 1849), pp. 913914. ‘Review. Portraits of
  • Secretary’, GardenersChronicle , 42 (20 October 1849), pp. 662663. Letters from Darwin to
  • 1849], DCP-LETT-1335, and 25 Oct. [1849], DCP-LETT-1261. Letter from Ransome to Michael Faraday, 6
  • Electrical Engineers, 19912012), vol. 4, pp. 305306, letter 2433. Report onBritish Association
  • Chicago Press, 1998), pp. 240287 (pp. 257263). Steven J. Plunkett, ‘Ipswich Museum moralities in

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 15 hits

  • Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • Observers Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August
  • silkworm breeds, or peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to
  • observations of catsinstinctive behaviour. Letter 4258 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, …
  • to artificially fertilise plants in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to
  • expression of emotion in her pet dog and birds. Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. …
  • is making similar observations for him. Letter 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. …
  • of wormholes. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] …
  • Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] Darwin thanks Hooker for
  • and orangs. Letter 5705 - Haast, J. F. J. von to Darwin, [4 December 1867] …
  • in a marble tablet”. Letter 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John
  • Men: Letter 385  - Wedgwood, S. E. &amp; J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] …
  • Hall, Staffordshire. Letter 1219  - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [3 February 1849] …
  • to look for more samples. Letter 4928  - Henslow, G. to Darwin, [11 November 1865] …
  • Men: Letter 378  - Darwin to Henslow, J. S., [20 September 1837] Darwin

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 12 hits

  • and colonial authorities. In the nineteenth-century, letter writing was one of the most important
  • in times of uncertainty, controversy, or personal loss. Letter writing was not only a means of
  • The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. Hooker. The second is between Darwin
  • to Hookerit is like confessing a murder”. Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D. …
  • wide-ranging genera. Darwin and Gray Letter 1674Darwin, C. R. to Gray, …
  • flora of the USA. He sends a list of plants from Grays Manual of botany [1848] and asks him to
  • Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] Darwin catches up on personal
  • Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 In this gossipy letter, Hooker
  • Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849 Darwin opens by discussing their
  • Mentors Darwin&#039;s close relationship with John Stevens Henslow, the professor of botany
  • Mentors This collection of letters documents Henslows mentoring while Darwin was on the
  • mail to Montevideo. He talks of being a sort of Protégé of Henslows and it is Henslowsbounden

Scientific Practice

Summary

Specialism|Experiment|Microscopes|Collecting|Theory Letter writing is often seen as a part of scientific communication, rather than as integral to knowledge making. This section shows how correspondence could help to shape the practice of science, from…

Matches: 17 hits

  • … | Microscopes | Collecting | Theory Letter writing is often seen as a part of …
  • … discussion was often the starting point for some of Darwin's most valuable and enduring …
  • … with detailed correspondence about barnacles. Letter 1514 — Darwin, C. R. to Huxley, T. …
  • … of one idea. – cirripedes morning & night.” Letter 1480 — Darwin, C. R. to Huxley, …
  • … of Living Cirripedia is published. He asks Huxley’s advice on presentation copies for …
  • … on embryological stages than Huxley thinks. Letter 1592 — Darwin, C. R. to Huxley, T. H …
  • … or the climbing habits of plants. One of Darwin's most important correspondents was the German …
  • … and difficulties of botanical experimentation. Letter 4895 — Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J …
  • … to be dichogamous. Letter 5429 — Müller, J. F. T. to Darwin, C. R., 4 Mar 1867 …
  • … of other species. Letter 5480 — Müller, J. F. T. to Darwin, C. R., 1 Apr 1867 …
  • Letter 5551 — Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J. F. T., 26 May [1867] Darwin thanks Müller for …
  • Letter 1018 — Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., [6 Nov 1846] Darwin tells Hooker, if he pays …
  • … Collecting specimens was an indispensable part of Darwin’s scientific method. In this collection of …
  • … 1262 — Darwin, C. R. to Hancock, Albany, [29–30 Oct 1849] Darwin thanks Hancock for specimens …
  • Letter 1251 — Darwin, C. R. to Gould, A. A., 20 Aug [1849] Darwin thanks J. D. Dana for …
  • Letter 1220 — Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 Hooker sends Darwin “a yarn about …
  • Letter 1260 — Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849 Darwin writes to Hooker about his …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … [A. von Humboldt 1811] Richardsons Fauna Borealis [J. Richardson 182937] …
  • Paper on consciousness in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on
  • worth studying in a metaphys. point of view Henslow has list of plants of Mauritius with
  • to White Nat. Hist of Selbourne [E. T. Bennett ed. 1837 and [J. Rennie] ed. 1833] read 19  : …
  • what have they written.? “Hunt” [J. Hunt 1806] p. 290
  • … [Reimarius 1760] The Highlands &amp; Western Isl ds  letter to Sir W Scott [MacCulloch 1824
  • chiefly on distribution of forms said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith
  • 183440]: In Portfolio ofabstracts34  —letter from Skuckard of books on Silk Worm
  • … [Gaertner 178891] (Plates on all seeds) R. Soc Henslow says there is a grand book with
  • Von. J. Metzger. Heidelberg 1841 [Metzger 1841] Read Henslow in Botanist 36  has written on
  • Life of Wilkie [Cunningham 1843] &amp; Chantry [G. Jones 1849]. Grotes History of Greece
  • M rs  Frys Life [Fry 1847] Horace Walpoles letter to C t . of Ossory [Walpole 1848] …
  • Universelle ou traité des Cepages Comte Odart 1849” [Odart 1849] read  very good . Rivers
  • Nat. Hist. of Sutherlanshire, Murray [C. W. G. Saint-John 1849] (read) Knox. Ornithological
  • on Pop. praised by Daily News. by M r  Hicks [Hickson 1849] Published separately Taylor &amp; …
  • Asiatic Society ]—contains very little Macleays letter to D r  Fleming [Macleay 1830] …
  • 1834]— d[itt]o d[itt]o d[itt]o. d[itt]o. 15 th  Henslows Botany [Henslow 1837].— d[itt]o d
  • … ] 4. Vol. references at End Feb. 23 rd . Henslow Pamph. on Wheat [Henslow 1841]— fact about
  • … [Heer 1854].— Hooker has it.— Very important Hookers letter Jan. 1859 Yules Ava [Yule 1858] …
  • of the material from these portfolios is in DAR 205, the letter from William Edward Shuckard to
  • years 18381842, under the command of Charles Wilkes, U.S.N. New York. [Abstract in DAR 71: 512.]  …
  • years 18381842, under the command of Charles Wilkes, U.S.N. Philadelphia. [Abstract in DAR 205.3: …
  • ou, iconographie de toutes les espèces et   variétés darbres, fruitiers cultivés dans cet   …
  • sur la distribution géographique des animaux vertébrés, moins les oiseauxJournal de Physique 94
  • Drury, Robert. 1729Madagascar; or, Robert Drurys   journal, during fifteen   years

What is an experiment?

Summary

Darwin is not usually regarded as an experimenter, but rather as an astute observer and a grand theorist. His early career seems to confirm this. He began with detailed note-taking, collecting and cataloguing on the Beagle, and edited a descriptive zoology…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … ‘all kinds of facts’ across a wide range of fields ( letter to W. D. Fox [25 January 1841] ). He …
  • … specimens for his own use. A portrait of Darwin in 1849 shows him with a specimen bag over …
  • … affinity. The two-fold division of Darwin’s science between observation and theory also seems …
  • … to travellers that was issued by the Navy (Herschel ed. 1849). He also treated many of his …
  • … on the wane, and it was gradually eclipsed in Darwin’s own lifetime by the more specialized, …
  • … men, with a curb on make far the best observers’ ( letter to C. H. L. Woodd , 4 March 1850 ). He …
  • … speculation there is no good & original observation’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 22 December …
  • … controlled space with specialized equipment. In Darwin’s day this was by no means the case. The …
  • … (small plots of land). Experimentation in Darwin’s day was not the monopoly of elite, highly …
  • … of an engineer on his early experiments with Drosera ( letter to Edward Cresy, 12 December …
  • … Foster. A final feature to note about Darwin’s experimental life is the pleasure that it …
  • … ‘I have become very fond of little experiments’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [21 March 1857] ; …
  • … ‘all nature is perverse & will not do as I wish it’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 7 May [1855] ). But …
  • … at Science … & am never happy except when at work’ ( letter to J. M. Herbert, 25 December [1880 …

Bibliography of Darwin’s geological publications

Summary

This list includes papers read by Darwin to the Geological Society of London, his books on the geology of the Beagle voyage, and other publications on geological topics.  Author-date citations refer to entries in the Darwin Correspondence Project’s…

Matches: 5 hits

  • … refer to entries in the Darwin Correspondence Project’s cumulative bibliography.  Where appropriate, …
  • … the coast of Chili, made during the survey of His Majesty’s Ship Beagle, commanded by Capt. FitzRoy, …
  • … F1660.] —Remarks on the preceding paper, in a letter from Charles Darwin, Esq., to Mr. …
  • … of scientific enquiry; prepared for the use of Her Majesty’s Navy: and adapted for travellers in …
  • … Suggestions for further reading… On Darwin’s work in geology: Herbert, Sandra. …