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Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 18 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • me much’ ( letter to Francis Galton, 15 [June 1879] ). Even the prospect of a holiday in the Lake
  • … ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] ). From July, Darwin had an additional
  • … ‘a dismal time’ ( letter to Henry Johnson, 24 September 1879 ). He may have been consoled to learn
  • all over like a baked pear’ ( enclosure in letter from R. W. Dixon, 20 December 1879 ). The year
  • or gone some other way round?’ At least the last letter of 1879 contained a warmer note and the
  • marriage settlement ( letter from W. M. Hacon, 31 December 1879 ). Seventy years old
  • nice and good as could be’ ( letter from Karl Beger, [ c. 12 February 1879] ). The masters of
  • of the Admiralty described the unknown young man asA M r Darwin grandson of the well known
  • him on 9 June not toexpend much powder & shot on M r  Butler’, for he really was not worth
  • leaving Darwinmore perplexed than ever about life of D r . D’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, 12
  • the highest point, for hiswhy”—“what for” &c are incessant’, Darwin joked on 2 July (first
  • which is his profession thonot a profitable one; also D r  C[lark]’s opinion that he was so
  • greatly amused Darwin, who felt it wasvery acute of M r  Ruskin to know that I feel a deep & …
  • and preventCattle diseases, Potato diseases &c’, probably did not know that Darwin had already

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

‘My heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old Shrewsbury friend Henry Johnson on 14 November 1880. Darwin became fully devoted to earthworms in the spring of the year, just after finishing the manuscript of…

Matches: 23 hits

  • heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • Charles Harrison Tindal, sent a cache of letters from two of Darwins grandfathers clerical friends
  • divines to see a pigs body opened is very amusing’, Darwin replied, ‘& that about my
  • Darwins Life . ‘In an endeavour to explain away y r . treatment of [William Alvey Darwin],’ …
  • he had written for the German journal Kosmos in February 1879, an issue produced in honour of
  • Butler, Evolution old and new , which had appeared in May 1879. Krause wanted to correct Butlers
  • Correspondence vol. 27, letter from Ernst Krause, 7 June 1879 , and letter to Ernst Krause, 9
  • Darwin stated that Krauses piece had been written in 1879 (before Evolution old and new was
  • by anticipation the position I have taken as regards D r Erasmus Darwin in my book Evolution old
  • to the end’, added her husband Richard ( letter from R. B. Litchfield, 1 February 1880 ). Even the
  • had raised the plant from seeds sent by Asa Gray in December 1879. His observations differed, …
  • by Gray in an article and textbook (A. Gray 1877 and A. Gray 1879, pp. 201). ‘I think you cannot
  • shake their heads in the same dismal manner as you & M r . Murray did, when I told them my
  • in a book about beetles the impressive wordscaptured by C. Darwin”. … This seemed to me glory
  • … ‘but the subject has amused me’ ( letter to W. C. McIntosh, 18 June 1880 ). Members of the family
  • great doctrines …“Come of Age”‘ ( letter from W. C. Williamson to Emma Darwin, 2 September 1880 ). …
  • vol. 27, letter from J. D. Hooker, 18 December 1879 ). For some years, Wallaces main source of
  • his voice as clearly as if he were present’ (letters to C. W. Fox, 29 March 1880 and 10 [April

Movement in Plants

Summary

The power of movement in plants, published on 7 November 1880, was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which the assistance of one of his children, Francis Darwin, is mentioned on the title page. The research for this…

Matches: 28 hits

  • 7 November 1880was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which
  • about their research while he was away from home. Although Darwin lacked a state of the art research
  • the advantages of both while Francis was working abroad. Darwin was privy to the inner workings of
  • methods and use the most advanced laboratory equipment. Darwin also benefitted from the instrument
  • that Francis had been introduced to at Würzburg. Darwin described his experimental practice
  • plant physiology, but it was at its core informed by Darwins theory of evolution, particularly by
  • early 1860s, at a time when his health was especially bad, Darwin had taken up the study of climbing
  • reproduced as a small book, giving it a much wider audience. Darwin was not the first naturalist to
  • which eventually appeared in 1875. In the same year, Darwin published a much longer work,  …
  • about the nature of movement, so much so, that at one point Darwin had considered combining the
  • Francis worked in this laboratory in the summers of 1878 and 1879,  he encountered some of the most
  • … ‘ Frank & I are working very hard on bloom & sleep &c.; but I am horribly afraid all
  • that exhibited all three types of movement ( letter from RILynch, [before 28 July 1877] ). ‘ …
  • couple of days ( letter from A. F. Batalin28 February 1879 ). Darwin was especially keen for his
  • so much at odds ( letter to Hugo de Vries 13 February 1879 ). He was reassured by De Vries, who
  • When Francis spent a month in Algiers in early 1879, Darwin asked him to visit the botanist Gaetano
  • seeds ( letter to Francis Darwin, [4 February8 March 1879] ). He continued to write up the
  • … ’. The lull in experimental work continued into March 1879, and Darwin seemed weary when he told
  • to learn about cutting thin sections of soft leaves &c.— Lastly the instrument for making marks
  • the subject of bloom from his bookIn mid-June 1879, Darwin was pleased to get back to
  • and growth ( letter from Hugo de Vries7 August 1879 ). Darwin replied, ‘ I thank you much for
  • the Spring ’. Luckily, De Vries published two papers in 1879 and 1880 that Darwin was later able to
  • … ‘A horrid boreIn late October 1879, Darwin told Gray, ‘ I have written a rather big
  • bodies’ ( letter to WTThiselton-Dyer29 October 1879 ). Thiselton-Dyer, who had assisted in
  • the curious mode of germinationand concluded, ‘ M r  Rattan seems to be a real good observer, …
  • orThe Nature of the Movements of Plants’ ( letter to R. F. Cooke23 April [1880] ). Cooke
  • was willing to publish on the usual terms ( letter from R. F. Cooke15 July 1880 ). This was also
  • pay more for at the usual rate of charging per inch &c they w dbe over £40’; he suggested

Darwin’s student booklist

Summary

In October 1825 Charles Darwin and his older brother, Erasmus, went to study medicine in Edinburgh, where their father, Robert Waring Darwin, had trained as a doctor in the 1780’s. Erasmus had already graduated from Cambridge and was continuing his studies…

Matches: 15 hits

  • In October 1825 Charles Darwin and his older brother, Erasmus, went to study medicine in Edinburgh, …
  • London for further medical training (see letter from E. A. Darwin, [29 September 1826] ). However
  • of England. This list is difficult to date precisely. Darwin mentions reading  Granby  in a
  • The position of  Granby  on the list would suggest that Darwin was very busy reading in January
  • of chemistry in 1801. Other books illustrate Darwins wider scientific interests, and also
  • … , which was edited by David Brewster; and Robert Grant took Darwin to meetings of the Wernerian
  • university. There are several books of travel, and Darwin seems to have been particularly
  • arctic zoology. Two titles are closely connected with Darwins familyZoonomia  was
  • a week between March 1750 and March 1752. Both he and Dr Darwin had Lichfield connections, but the
  • Almacks ,  Granby  and Brambletye House.  Darwin wrote to his sister Susan on 29 January
  • … <Ni>tric Oxide?   (DAR 19: 34) Darwins student booklist - the text
  • Henry Chemistry 17  2 Vols 8 Vo Sewards memoirs of Darwin 18  1 Vol 8 Vo. Several
  • 3 Abernethy 1822. There is a lightly annotated copy in the Darwin LibraryCUL, bound with Abernethy
  • 14 Bostock 18247. Volume 1 is in the Darwin LibraryDown. 15 Jameson trans. 1827. There
  • times to the year 2000 . (Revised edition.) Edited by H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. 60 vols. …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 25 hits

  • Re: DesignAdaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and othersby Craig
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring
  • Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the dress of a modern day
  • Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as a sort
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwinmade his home on the border of the little
  • are kept in check by a constitutional weakness. DARWIN: A plain but comfortable brick
  • by every blessing except that of vigorous healthDARWIN4   My confounded stomach
  • pursuits and the simplicity of his character. DARWIN:   5   I am allowed to work now
  • own house, where he was the most charming of hosts. DARWIN:   6   My life goes on
  • being a part of [an unpublished] manuscript. Darwin settles down to write. His tone is
  • THE CONCURRENCE OF BOTANISTS: 1855 In which Darwin initiates a long-running correspondence
  • gossip about difficult colleagues (Agassiz). Gray realizes Darwin is not revealing all of his
  • man, more formally attired and lighter on his feet than Darwin. He has many more demands on his time
  • catches his attention. He opens the letter. DARWIN8   April 25 th 1855. My
  • filled up the paper you sent me as well as I could. DARWIN10   My dear Dr Gray. I
  • is condensed in that little sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat
  • surprising good. GRAY:   12   My dear Mr Darwin, I rejoice in furnishing facts to
  • of the sort to the advancement of scienceDARWIN13   I hopebefore [the] end of
  • paragraph, in which I quote and differ from you[r178   doctrine that each variation has been
  • ARTS AND SCIENCES, PROCEEDINGS XVII, 1882 4  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 10 MAY 1848
  • 1872 208  JD HOOKER TO C DARWIN, 29 NOVEMBER 1879 209 A GRAY, 1882, …

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Religion

Summary

Design|Personal Belief|Beauty|The Church Perhaps the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same can be said of the evolution controversy today; however the nature of the disputes and the manner in…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same …
  • … nineteenth century were different in important ways. Many of Darwin's leading supporters were …
  • … their religious beliefs with evolutionary theory. Darwin's own writing, both in print and …
  • … much as possible. A number of correspondents tried to draw Darwin out on his own religious views, …
  • … political contexts. Design Darwin was not the first to challenge …
  • … on the controversial topic of design. The first is between Darwin and Harvard botanist Asa Gray, …
  • … Origin . The second is a single letter from naturalist A. R. Wallace to Darwin on design and …
  • Darwin and Wallace Letter 5140 — Wallace, A. R. to Darwin, C. R., 2 July 1866 …
  • Darwin and Graham Letter 13230 — Darwin, C. R. to Graham, William, 3 July 1881 …
  • … Letter 12041 — Darwin, C. R. to Fordyce, John, 7 May 1879 In this letter marked “private”, …

People featured in the Dutch photograph album

Summary

Here is a list of people that appeared in the photograph album Darwin received for his birthday on 12 February 1877 from scientific admirers in the Netherlands. Many thanks to Hester Loeff for identifying and researching them. No. …

Matches: 5 hits

  • … list of people that appeared in the  photograph album Darwin received for his birthday on 12 …
  • … 20 june 1854 Middelburg 13 october 1879 Groningen 8 …
  • … 16 july 1815 Rotterdam 28 february 1879 Vucht 102 …
  • … Arnhem 7 june 1834   23 december 1879 Arnhem 117 …
  • … 21 september 1849 Den Bosch 13 oktober 1879 Groningen …

People featured in the Dutch photograph album

Summary

List of people appearing in the photograph album Darwin received from scientific admirers in the Netherlands for his birthday on 12 February 1877. We are grateful to Hester Loeff for providing this list and for permission to make her research available.…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … List of people appearing in the  photograph album Darwin received from scientific admirers in …
  • … 20 June 1854 Middelburg 13 October 1879 Groningen Feminist and …
  • … Died just a few months after the album was sent to Charles Darwin at the age of 53 …
  • … Geologist, Economist an Darwinist. Corresponded with Darwin and translated The descent of Man in …
  • … 16 July 1815 Rotterdam 28 February 1879 Vucht He was Med. Dr.  …
  • … Arnhem 7 June 1834   23 December 1879 Arnhem https://www …
  • … 21 September 1849 Den Bosch 13 October 1879 Groningen Partner of …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 25 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • editorsidentification of the book or article to which Darwin refers. A full list of these works is
  • page number (or numbers, as the case may be) on which Darwins entry is to be found. The
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian
  • in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on Geog. distrib: of Brit: …
  • Wiegman has pub. German pamphlet on crossing oats &c [Wiegmann 1828] Horticultural
  • in Library of Hort. Soc. [DAR *119:5v.] M c .Neil 16  has written good article
  • on the Dog with illustrations of about 100 varieties [?C. H. Smith 183940] 24 Flourens
  • … [Lindley 1840]— Chapter on Races improvement of &c &c important I should think
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • 9  CD did not follow his own advice. In 1879, he stated that he had unbounded respect for
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21

Suggested reading

Summary

  Contemporary writing Anon., The English matron: A practical manual for young wives, (London, 1846). Anon., The English gentlewoman: A practical manual for young ladies on their entrance to society, (Third edition, London, 1846). Becker, L. E.…

Matches: 7 hits

  • Buckley, A.,  The fairy-land of science , (London, 1879; Philadelphia 1888). Holmes, M. …
  • Huxley, T. H.,  Lectures to working men - Lecture 1: On Darwin's work, 'Origin of
  • scientific thinking  (London, 2006). Browne, JDarwins Origin of species : A b
  • … , pp. 84117Davidoff, L. & Hall, C.,  Family fortunes: Men and women of the
  • 1820 - 1885 , (Georgia, 2007). Harvey, J., ‘‘Darwins angels’: The women correspondents of
  • Review  19:2 (2009), pp. 197 - 210. Hubbard, R.,  The politics of womens biology , …
  • nature for new audiences  (Chicago, 2007). Numbers, R. L. & Stenhouse, J., (eds.),  …