skip to content

Darwin Correspondence Project

Search: contains ""

400 Bad Request

Bad Request

Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand.


Apache Server at dcp-public.lib.cam.ac.uk Port 443
Search:
in keywords
13 Items

Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

Matches: 24 hits

  • … is to lessen injury to leaves from radiation In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his …
  • … in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of experiments to …
  • … plant laboratories in Europe. While Francis was away, Darwin delighted in his role as …
  • … from botanical research was provided by potatoes, as Darwin took up the cause of an Irish …
  • … would rid Ireland of famine. Several correspondents pressed Darwin for his views on religion, …
  • … closed with remarkable news of a large legacy bequeathed to Darwin by a stranger as a reward for his …
  • … scientific man’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 December [1878] ). Writing to Ernst Haeckel on …
  • … Expression ), and the final revision of Origin (1872), Darwin had turned almost exclusively to …
  • … plants.’ Movement in plants In the spring of 1878, Darwin started to focus on the …
  • … were enrolled as researchers, as were family members. Darwin asked his niece Sophy to observe …
  • … come up arched’ ( letter to Sophy Wedgwood, 24 March [1878–80] ). While Darwin was studying the …
  • … on one side, then another, to produce movement in the stalk. Darwin compared adult and young leaves …
  • … after growth has ceased or nearly ceased.’ Finally, Darwin turned to plant motion below the …
  • … of apex’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, [11 May 1878] ). Having found plants responsive to …
  • … at my blunder’ ( letter to John Tyndall, 22 December [1878] ). Son abroad Darwin’s …
  • … kind to him’ ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 18 June [1878] ). While Francis was away, Darwin …
  • … work, I scribble to you ( letter to Francis Darwin, 7 [July 1878] ). Two weeks later he wrote: ‘I …
  • … to discuss it with’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, 20 [July 1878] ). It is unclear why the …
  • … reported ( letter from Francis Darwin, [after 7 July 1878] ): ‘The oats have only just begun to …
  • … Francis wrote ( letter from Francis Darwin, [before 17 July 1878] ), ‘a strong horizontal axis …
  • … rather’ ( letter from Francis Darwin, [before 3 August 1878] ). One day Francis observed that the …
  • … out one’ ( letter from Francis Darwin, [after 7 July 1878] ). Sachs’s confidence was apparently …
  • … Record”’ ( letter from Edmund Mojsisovics von Mojsvár, 28 April 1878 ). ‘What a wonderful change …
  • … secretary, Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil ( letter to R. A. T. Gascoyne-Cecil, 18 May 1878 ). …

Darwin and the Church

Summary

The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It shows another side of the man who is more often remembered for his personal struggles with faith, or for his role in large-scale controversies over the…

Matches: 24 hits

  • The story of Charles Darwins involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It
  • unique window into this complicated relationship throughout Darwins life, as it reveals his
  • belief (and doubt) than many non-conformist denominations. Darwins parents attended a Unitarian
  • the necessary studies to be a clergyman. During Darwins lifetime, the vast majority of the
  • income was essential to enjoy a gentlemanly lifestyle. For Darwin, who could rely on the financial
  • compatible with the pursuit of scientific interests. Indeed, Darwins Cambridge mentorJohn Stevens
  • … (Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine (1887): 321). Darwin started on his journey around the world
  • it even through a grove of Palms.—’ (letter to Caroline Darwin, 256 April [1832] ). Darwins
  • Museum or some other learned place’ (letter from E. A. Darwin, 18 August [1832] ). Writing to Fox
  • about—’ (letter to W. D. Fox, [912 August] 1835 ). Darwins doubts about orthodox belief, and
  • in 1838 and 1839, as can be read here. In the end, Darwin chose a middle coursea life of ease in
  • within six years of his return from the  Beagle  voyage, Darwin moved to Down House, in the
  • where their children Mary and Charles were buried; later Darwins brother Erasmus, Emmas sister
  • of Emma, whose religious scruples are discussed here. But Darwins correspondence reveals his own
  • Although he was not the principal landowner in Down, Darwin was a gentleman of means, and clearly
  • made inroads on Anglican authority in the countryside. The Darwin family took an interest in, and
  • Many of the letters highlighted in this section focus on Darwins long-standing relationship with
  • To the end of his life Innes refused to be persuaded by Darwins theory of evolution, but
  • cordial; in the first extant letter of the correspondence, Darwin wrote to Innes expressing concern
  • letter of 1854 in which he saidFrom all I have seen of M r  Innesconduct towards the poor &amp
  • a high opinion of Darwins character that he claimed in 1878 to have made the following declaration
  • of himself. Letter from J. B. Innes, 1 December 1878 This was a stirring
  • Innes informed Darwin that though heheard all good of M r . Ffindens moral character, his
  • an interesting letter from Darwin to the evangelist J. W. C. Fegan. Darwin whole-heartedly supported

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 22 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • a holiday in the Lake District in August did little to raise Darwins spirits. ‘I wish that my
  • W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] ). From July, Darwin had an additional worry: the
  • that his grandfather had felt the same way. In 1792, Erasmus Darwin had written: ‘The worst thing I
  • all over like a baked pear’ ( enclosure in letter from R. W. Dixon, 20 December 1879 ). The year
  • contained a warmer note and the promise of future happiness: Darwin learned he was to be visited by
  • Hacon, 31 December 1879 ). Seventy years old Darwins seventieth birthday on 12
  • the veteran of Modern Zoology’, but it was in Germany that Darwin was most fêted. A German
  • nice and good as could be’ ( letter from Karl Beger, [ c. 12 February 1879] ). The masters of
  • accepted in Germany. ‘On this festive day’, Haeckel told Darwin, ‘you can look back, with justified
  • of the Admiralty described the unknown young man asA M r Darwin grandson of the well known
  • him on 9 June not toexpend much powder & shot on M r  Butler’, for he really was not worth
  • leaving Darwinmore perplexed than ever about life of D r . D’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, 12
  • … ). Francis in Würzburg As he had done in 1878, Francis Darwin spent the summer of 1879
  • the highest point, for hiswhy”—“what for” &c are incessant’, Darwin joked on 2 July (first
  • which is his profession thonot a profitable one; also D r  C[lark]’s opinion that he was so
  • greatly amused Darwin, who felt it wasvery acute of M r  Ruskin to know that I feel a deep & …
  • and preventCattle diseases, Potato diseases &c’, probably did not know that Darwin had already
  • cross-fertilisation, had first contacted Darwin in 1876. By 1878, Darwin was sufficiently impressed

Movement in Plants

Summary

The power of movement in plants, published on 7 November 1880, was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which the assistance of one of his children, Francis Darwin, is mentioned on the title page. The research for this…

Matches: 27 hits

  • 7 November 1880was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which
  • about their research while he was away from home. Although Darwin lacked a state of the art research
  • the advantages of both while Francis was working abroad. Darwin was privy to the inner workings of
  • methods and use the most advanced laboratory equipment. Darwin also benefitted from the instrument
  • that Francis had been introduced to at Würzburg. Darwin described his experimental practice
  • plant physiology, but it was at its core informed by Darwins theory of evolution, particularly by
  • early 1860s, at a time when his health was especially bad, Darwin had taken up the study of climbing
  • reproduced as a small book, giving it a much wider audience. Darwin was not the first naturalist to
  • which eventually appeared in 1875. In the same year, Darwin published a much longer work,  …
  • about the nature of movement, so much so, that at one point Darwin had considered combining the
  • digestive processes. With his final great botanical work, Darwin would attemptto bring all the
  • emotions had their origins in non-human animal expression. Darwin had not done experimental work in
  • viewed the division between animals and plants as absolute, Darwin was interested in similarities. …
  • become adapted to perform new functions, like climbing? For Darwin, physiology was a way of seeing
  • attracting students from all over Europe and beyond. When Darwins son Francis worked in this
  • …   ‘Mad about drops of waterDarwins interest in the diversified movements of
  • connection is revealed only though correspondence because Darwin never published on bloom. In August
  • … ‘ Frank & I are working very hard on bloom & sleep &c.; but I am horribly afraid all
  • that exhibited all three types of movement ( letter from RILynch, [before 28 July 1877] ). ‘ …
  • Movement in plants , p. 179. In May 1878, Darwin had pointed out the importance of
  • his experiments on the function of bloom. By December 1878, Darwin was thinking about the
  • accuracy ( letter from JDCooper13 December 1878 ). The method would be expensive, so Darwin
  • to learn about cutting thin sections of soft leaves &c.— Lastly the instrument for making marks
  • the curious mode of germinationand concluded, ‘ M r  Rattan seems to be a real good observer, …
  • orThe Nature of the Movements of Plants’ ( letter to R. F. Cooke23 April [1880] ). Cooke
  • was willing to publish on the usual terms ( letter from R. F. Cooke15 July 1880 ). This was also
  • pay more for at the usual rate of charging per inch &c they w dbe over £40’; he suggested

Darwin in letters, 1882: Nothing too great or too small

Summary

In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous October, and for the first time in decades he was not working on another book. He remained active in botanical research, however. Building on his recent studies in plant…

Matches: 26 hits

  • In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous
  • for scientific colleagues or their widows facing hardship. Darwin had suffered from poor health
  • of his scientific friends quickly organised a campaign for Darwin to have greater public recognition
  • Botanical observation and experiment had long been Darwins greatest scientific pleasure. The year
  • to Fritz Müller, 4 January 1882 ). These were topics that Darwin had been investigating for years, …
  • working at the effects of Carbonate of Ammonia on roots,’ Darwin wrote, ‘the chief result being that
  • contents, if immersed for some hours in a weak solution of C. of Ammonia’. Darwins interest in root
  • London on 6 and 16 March, respectively. In January, Darwin corresponded with George John
  • letter from Arthur de Souza Corrêa, 28 December 1881 ). Darwin had a long-running interest in such
  • experiments had been conducted to lend support to Darwins theory of pangenesis (see
  • He was eager to write up the results on Brazilian cane, with Darwin providing a detailed outline: ‘I
  • at the Linnean Society on 4 May, but not published. Darwin carried on with botanical work in
  • which are asymmetric, thus facilitating cross-fertilisation. Darwins aim, he said, was just to
  • 3 April 1882 ). Earthworms and evolution Darwins last book, Earthworms , had been
  • Appendix V). The conservative Quarterly Review , owned by Darwins publisher John Murray, carried
  • themselves’ ( Quarterly Review , January 1882, p. 179). Darwin commented at length on the review
  • our homes, would in this case greatly suffer’ ( letter to C. A. Kennard, 9 January 1882 ). Kennard
  • judged, intellectually his inferior, please ( letter from C. A. Kennard, 28 January 1882 ). …
  • dull aching in the chest’ (Emma Darwin to G. H. Darwin, [ c . 28 March 1882] (DAR 210.3: 45)). …
  • to some Estancia,’ wrote Hughes, ‘as the scenery &c. will amply repay your trouble’ ( letter
  • where he had witnessed an earthquake in 1835 ( letter from R. E. Alison, [MarchJuly 1835 ]). …
  • will be months before I am able to work’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [ c . 10 April 1864] ). To
  • experiments. Francis went to Germany in the summer of 1878 for more experience in physiological
  • this to you’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, [1 August 1878] ). The last years also saw Darwin
  • and Earthworms , pp. 2218). Darwin resumed contact in 1878. On receiving Darwins letter, …
  • at wormbs”’ ( letter from Mary Johnson, [after 22 July 1878] ).   Edition complete

Cross and self fertilisation

Summary

The effects of cross and self fertilisation in the vegetable kingdom, published on 10 November 1876, was the result of a decade-long project to provide evidence for Darwin’s belief that ‘‘Nature thus tells us, in the most emphatic manner, that she abhors…

Matches: 28 hits

  • the result of a decade-long project to provide evidence for Darwins belief that ‘‘Nature thus tells
  • on plants with two or three different forms of flowers, Darwin had focused on the anatomical and
  • of different forms of pollen. Although many plants that Darwin observed had flowers with adaptations
  • rates, growth, and constitutional vigour. Although Darwin was no stranger to long months and years
  • … … is highly remarkableIn September 1866, Darwin announced to the American botanist
  • several years ( To Édouard Bornet, 1 December 1866 ). Darwin began a series of experiments, …
  • … ). It was only after a new season of experiments that Darwin would confirm that this poppy shed its
  • access to flowers was only the tip of the iceberg. Darwin next focused on the California
  • conditions’ ( From Fritz Müller, 1 December 1866 ). Darwins interest was piqued and he described
  • when self-fertilised, although fewer than crossed plants. Darwin sent some of these seeds to Müller, …
  • … [1868] ). Müller, in turn, sent seeds from his plants to Darwin and both men continued to
  • Müller remarked, on receiving a new batch of seeds from Darwin, ‘that it wascurious to see, on
  • … ( From Fritz Müller, 15 June 1869 ). By May 1870, Darwin reported that he wasrearing crossed
  • From a fairly early stage in his experimental programme, Darwin began to pay more attention to the
  • seeds of Ipomœa. I remember saying the contrary to you & M r  Smith at Kew. But the result is
  • the sweet pea ( Lathyrus odoratus ), and in October 1867, Darwin wrote to James Moggridge to ask
  • of the year ( To JTMoggridge, 1 October [1867] ). Darwin was beginning to suspect that the
  • simply did not exist in Britain. During a visit to Darwin in May 1866, Robert Caspary, a
  • by the former ( From Robert Caspary, 18 February 1868 ). Darwin eagerly requested seed from both
  • was published on 30 January 1868. In April 1868, Darwin informed George Bentham, ‘I am
  • to elongate when the pollen touches the stigmatic surface. Darwin was able to discern that
  • plant sexual relations, Müller, who sent the publication to Darwin, reported that he was surprised
  • the fertility of the offspring (F. Müller 1868b, p. 629). Darwin urged further experimentation. ‘I
  • the Abutilon sterile with some individuals is remarkable’, Darwin replied, adding that he had sown
  • I am already plagued by foreign Translators, Reviewers, &c.’ ( To John Murray, 4 May [1873] ). …
  • the set of all my works, I would suggest 1,500’ ( To R. F. Cooke, 16 September 1876 ). In the
  • of hybrids, has not yet been produced’ ( From ARWallace, 13 December 1876 ). No reply to this
  • A. W. Rimpau, 10 December 1877 ). By the end of February 1878, Murray was ready to print the second

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 24 hits

  • The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to
  • four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11
  • once, the labour of checking proofs proved a blessing, as Darwin sought solace for the loss of his
  • and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and
  • had involved much time and effort the previous year, and Darwin clearly wanted to focus his
  • of the second edition of Climbing plants ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 23 February 1876 ). When
  • single-volume edition titled Geological observations , Darwin resisted making any revisions at
  • volume, Coral reefs , already in its second edition. Darwin was neverthelessfirmly resolved not
  • meticulous correction of errors in the German editions made Darwin less anxious about correcting the
  • to Carus. ( Letter to J. V. Carus, 24 April 1876. ) Darwin focused instead on the second
  • concentrated on themeans of crossing’, was seen by Darwin as the companion to Cross and self
  • return to old work than part of the future work outlined by Darwin in hislittle Autobiography’ ( …
  • holiday after finishing Cross and self fertilisation , Darwin took up the suggestion made by a
  • for his family only. Writing for an hour every afternoon, Darwin finished his account on 3 August
  • dimittis.”’ (‘Recollections’, pp. 41819). Darwin remained firm in his resolution to
  • ever return to the consideration of man.’ In particular, Darwin seemed eager to avoid issues that
  • effected by his forthcoming pamphlet, Darwin confounded (C. OShaughnessy 1876), which, he
  • and who had succeeded in giving him pain ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 17 June 1876 ). Although
  • years experiments’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [ c . 19 March 1876] ). A less welcome reaction
  • anyone who wrote a lot, but the novelty soon wore off and in 1878 the machine was given away. …
  • because of along and terrible illness’ ( letter to C. S. Wedgwood, 20 April 1876 ). By the time
  • in harmony with yours’ ( letter from George Henslow, [ c. 7 December 1876] ). A more typical

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 25 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). The death of a
  • from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one
  • I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a weeks visit to
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in
  • 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and sceptics Darwin excused himself for reasons of
  • by George Henry Lewes and Marian Evans (George Eliot), but Darwin excused himself, finding it too
  • the month, another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwins cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those
  • imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin agreed that it wasall imposture’ …
  • stop word getting to America of thestrange newsthat Darwin had alloweda spirit séanceat his
  • the first three months of the year and, like many of Darwins enterprises in the 1870s, were family
  • 21, letter to Smith, Elder & Co., 17 December [1873] ). Darwin himself had some trouble in
  • and letter to Charles Lyell, [13 January 1874] ). Darwin blamed his illness for the
  • … . In his preface ( Coral reefs  2d ed., pp. vvii), Darwin reasserted the priority of his work. …
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • details of an Australian variety of sundew ( letter from T. C. Copland, 23 June 1874 ). …
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He
  • head that M r  Spencers terms of equilibration &c always bother me & make everything less
  • M. M. Radovanović, 17 September 1874 ), which appeared in 1878. Books and articles were

Fool's experiments

Summary

‘I love fools' experiments. I am always making them’, was one of the most interesting things the zoologist E. Ray Lankester ever heard Darwin say. ‘A great deal might be written as comment on that statement’, Lankester later recorded, but he limited…

Matches: 24 hits

  • interesting things the zoologist E. Ray Lankester ever heard Darwin say. ‘A great deal might be
  • the dark into great discoveries.’ [1] What were Darwinsfoolsexperimentsand did they
  • great discoveries’? The fools experiment that Darwin had described to Lankester involved
  • see whether one would act in any way upon the other. [2]  Darwin could hardly have expected that
  • surprised by nature typified his fools experiments. While Darwin was cautious about speculation, he
  • knowledge that might be limited in some wayDarwins fools experiments, however, were more
  • or mysterious aspects of the natural world and were, for Darwin, a form of wishful thinking. When
  • send him some tropical mosses for his experiments. In 1878, Darwin, deep into his
  • those of the Polish botanist Theophil Ciesielski. Darwin wondered whether hot and dry radicles might
  • before proceeding to more complex explanations guided Darwins experimental practice in this case.  …
  • on etiolated leavesbut they would not turn white. ’ Darwin was delighted to hear thatSachs
  • the results of many fools experiments were negative, Darwins enthusiasm for them did not wane. …
  • to the Scottish botanist Alexander Stephen Wilson in 1878, ‘ I have often incidentally observed
  • of silk. While not labelling this a fools experiment, Darwin did admit that in theeyes of all
  • Hannays attempts to produce artificial diamonds in 1881, Darwin suggested a modification to the
  • of the carbon for diamonds in their natural place. ’ Darwin had long wishedthat some one w d
  • … ‘ side-resulthad emerged from a fools experiment Darwin carried out in June 1842. While
  • he hadplantedin 1842Unexpectedly, it was Darwins three-year old son William, whose early
  • meant that the record of the experiment ended up not in Darwins accounts of bees but in the
  • … (DAR 210.11: 37).  One of those children, Francis Darwin, when recalling Darwins love of
  • the problem of free will and determinism.’ This involved Darwin following the pattern of many other
  • in self-experimentation. Over several weeks in 1879, Darwin found thatwith practice he could
  • a creative act, or by inspiration.”’  [3] Darwin also engaged in empathetic
  • a wild experiment. ’   [1]  E. R. Lankester. 'Charles Robert Darwin' …

4.35 Frederick Sem, caricature

Summary

< Back to Introduction A caricature drawing of Darwin by Frederick Sem was one of a series of his portrait caricatures acquired by Queen Alexandra for her scrapbook or album, which has been preserved in the Royal Collection. Darwin is shown leaning…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … &lt; Back to Introduction A caricature drawing of Darwin by Frederick Sem was one of a
  • album, which has been preserved in the Royal Collection. Darwin is shown leaning on a lectern with
  • At bottom left is an inscription, ’ScienceProff r Darwin’.   Frederick Sem was French
  • on the basis of the allusions in their inscriptions to c.1880-1, i.e. some years later than the
  • singly represents a field of activity and achievement. Darwin isScience’, CarlylePhilosophy’, …
  • with no reference to the knighthood which he received in 1878. A date in the 1870s is certainly the
  • date of creation unknown; probably mid-1870s to c. 1880 
 medium and material pencil and

Before Origin: the ‘big book’

Summary

Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the very day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles (Darwin's Journal). He had long considered the question of species. In 1842, he outlined a theory of transmutation in a…

Matches: 22 hits

  • Darwin begansorting notes for Species Theoryon 9 September 1854, the
  • day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles ( Darwin's Journal ). He had long
  • to paper in a more substantial essay. By this point, Darwin had also admitted to his close friend
  • he acknowledged, ‘ like confessing a murder ’. While Darwin recognised he had far more work to do
  • reaction to the transmutation theory it contained convinced Darwin that further evidence for the
  • of Vestiges to him. It took another ten years before Darwin felt ready to start collating his
  • six months before he started sorting his species notes, Darwin had worried that the process would
  • I shall feel, if I when I get my notes together on species &amp;c &amp;c, the whole thing explodes
  • immutability of species ’, he told his cousin William Darwin Fox. Experimental work
  • set up to provide crucial evidence for his arguments. Fox, Darwin assumed, would have bred pigeons
  • intensely bred to exaggerate particular characters, would, Darwin believed, clearly exhibit the
  • amusementand be ahorrid bore ’. Contrary to Darwins expectations, however, the pigeon
  • Henrietta . In April 1855, at the same time as Darwin began his pigeon breeding programme, …
  • Hoping to benefit from Hookers botanical expertise, Darwin inquired: ‘ will you tell me at a
  • land bridges suggested by the naturalist Edward Forbes. Darwin declared to Hooker in July 1856y
  • to me, &amp; yet I cannot honestly admit the doctrine ’. Darwin thought Forbeshypothesisan
  • of untying it. ’ Persuading men of science Darwins patient untying of the knot of
  • geograph. distribution, geological historyaffinities &amp;c &amp;c &amp;c.. And it seems to me, …
  • about the permanence of species.— By 1857, Darwin had found the confidence to describe his
  • of fellow naturalists. Grays response was everything Darwin must have hoped for. Stating that his
  • longer chapter on Instinct’, Darwin told Romanes in June 1878, ‘ I have never had time to work it
  • and a half chapters were edited and published in 1975 by R. C. Stauffer under the title Charles

People featured in the Dutch photograph album

Summary

Here is a list of people that appeared in the photograph album Darwin received for his birthday on 12 February 1877 from scientific admirers in the Netherlands. Many thanks to Hester Loeff for identifying and researching them. No. …

Matches: 4 hits

  • … list of people that appeared in the  photograph album Darwin received for his birthday on 12 …
  • … 6 october 1806 Amsterdam 31 july 1878 Amsterdam 73 …
  • … 16 february 1805 Wurzburg 23 january 1878 Den Haag 99 …
  • … 24 february 1820 Middelstum 19 november 1878 Beek 124 …

People featured in the Dutch photograph album

Summary

List of people appearing in the photograph album Darwin received from scientific admirers in the Netherlands for his birthday on 12 February 1877. We are grateful to Hester Loeff for providing this list and for permission to make her research available.…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … List of people appearing in the  photograph album Darwin received from scientific admirers in …
  • … Died just a few months after the album was sent to Charles Darwin at the age of 53 …
  • … 6 October 1806 Amsterdam 31 July 1878 Amsterdam   …
  • … Geologist, Economist an Darwinist. Corresponded with Darwin and translated The descent of Man in …
  • … 16 February 1805 Wurzburg 23 January 1878 Den Haag …
  • … 24 February 1820 Middelstum 19 November 1878 Beek   …