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Darwin Correspondence Project
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To J. J. Weir   18 April [1868]

Summary

Discusses rapid replacement of mates among birds. "I begin to think that the pairing of birds must be as delicate and tedious an operation as the pairing of young gentlemen and ladies. If I can convince myself that there are habitually many unpaired birds it will be a great aid to me in sexual selection". Notes rivalry of singing birds.

Heard from George Rolleston of the inherited effects of an eye injury.

Disagrees with A. R. Wallace’s idea "that birds learn to make their nests from having seen them whilst young" ["The philosophy of birds’ nests", Intellect. Obs. 11 (1867): 413–20].

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  John Jenner Weir
Date:  18 Apr [1868]
Classmark:  Duke University, Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library (RL.10387)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-6128

From George Thurber   18–20 April 1868

Summary

About an American edition of Variation.

Author:  George Thurber; (Orange Judd & Co.)
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  18–20 Apr 1868
Classmark:  DAR 178: 120
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-6129
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William Darwin Fox

Summary

Charles Darwin’s cousin, William Darwin Fox, was admitted to Christ’s College, Cambridge, in 1824, three years before Darwin; the two men became close friends. They corresponded throughout their lives, exchanging accounts of their growing families…

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  • … Charles Darwin’s cousin, William Darwin Fox, was admitted to Christ’s College, Cambridge, in 1824, …

St George Jackson Mivart

Summary

In the second half of 1874, Darwin’s peace was disturbed by an anonymous article in the Quarterly Review suggesting that his son George was opposed to the institution of marriage and in favour of ‘unrestrained licentiousness’. Darwin suspected, correctly,…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … from the children would be a peculiarly bitter blow’ (p. 418). The next steps would be to …
  • … are elsewhere expressly approved by him. Thus he remarks (p. 418): ‘A next step, and one to my mind …