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Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 26 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect
  • ease of distribution sometime in late 1867 or early 1868. Darwin went over his questions, refining
  • was the collection of observations on a global scale. Darwin was especially interested in peoples
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • The Scottish botanist John Scott wrote from Calcutta, 4 May 1868 : “Shame isexpressed by an
  • and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such
  • the collection of information to its display in print. After Darwin received all of the replies to
  • exceptyesorno.” “The same state of mindDarwin would later assert in Expression of the
  • uniformity.” Table of Correspondence about Darwins Questionnaire (click on the letter
  • could available online ahead of schedule as part of theDarwin and Human Natureproject, funded by
  • nodding vertically Blair, R.H. 11 July
  • Fuegians Brooke, C.A.J. 30 Nov 1870
  • Dyaks Brooke, C.A.J. 30 April 1871
  • Southampton, England letter to W.E. Darwin shrugging/pouting of
  • blushing Darwin, Francis 20 June 1867
  • Bartlett and S. Sutton Darwin, Francis
  • pouting Darwin, W.E. [after 29 March 1868] …
  • blushing in blind students Darwin, W.E. [7
  • blushing Darwin, W.E. [22? April 1868] …
  • Foster, Michael 4 June [1871] Trinity College, …
  • Geach, F.F. 4 July 1868 Johore, Malaysia
  • Haast, J.F.J. von 4 Dec 1867 Christchurch, New
  • Reade, Winwood W. [c.8 or 9 Apr 1870] Accra, West
  • in Hottentots Smyth, R. Brough 13 Aug 1868

Darwin in letters, 1881: Old friends and new admirers

Summary

In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began writing about all the eminent men he had met. He embarked on this task, which formed an addition to his autobiography, because he had nothing else to do. He had…

Matches: 27 hits

  • In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began
  • a very old man, who probably will not last much longer.’ Darwins biggest fear was not death, but
  • sweetest place on this earth’. From the start of the year, Darwin had his demise on his mind. He
  • provision for the dividing of his wealth after his death. Darwins gloominess was compounded by the
  • and new admirers got in touch, and, for all his fears, Darwin found several scientific topics to
  • Evolution old and new when revising his essay on Erasmus Darwins scientific work, and that Darwin
  • Butler, as he told his daughter Henrietta Litchfield on 4 January , ‘would like its publication
  • as for its success’, Darwin told Arabella Buckley on 4 January . Buckley had suggested
  • … ‘500 more, making 2000’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 January 1881 ). Unlike Darwins other
  • publish, although he was sending his printersin 3 or 4 weeks the M.S. of a quite small book of
  • the sale of books beinga game of chance’ ( letter to R. F. Cooke, 12 April 1881 ). On 18 May
  • he would feelless sulky in a day or two’ ( letter to R. F. Cooke, 29 July 1881 ). The degree of
  • falls at this late period of the season’ ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 30 July 1881 ). Darwin gave in
  • with you’, a Swedish teacher told him ( letter from C. E. Södling, 14 October 1881 ), while H. M. …
  • to possibilities for women, judging from her organization &c’. When Darwin replied the following
  • … ‘bread-winners’ ( Correspondence vol. 30, letter to C. A. Kennard, 9 January 1882 ). …
  • publication & to acknowledge any criticism’ ( letter to C. G. Semper, 19 July 1881 ). He
  • pointing out that in science he considered2nd, 3rd and 4th rate men of very high importance’. …
  • … ‘an excellent Journal’ ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 4 July [1881] ). In these ways, Darwin kept up
  • … [1881] ). Feelingawfully guiltyfor doing so, on 4 August Hooker sent Darwin a list of queries
  • to bear thewear & tear of controversy’ ( letter to G. R. Jesse, 23 April 1881 ). Later in
  • everyone elses judgment on the subject ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 12 July 1881 ). However, some
  • … ‘I was a fool to go,’ he told William Darwin on 4 August , ‘but I could hardly have declined.’ He
  • do not be disappointed if the sale is small’ ( letter to R. F. Cooke, 5 October 1881 ). The
  • provedthe greatness of their power’ ( letter from M. C. Stanley, 16 October 1881 ). Hooker
  • men the true methods of investigation’ ( letter from C. V. Riley, 18 December 1881 ). …
  • new investigations’. Thanking Wiesner for the book on 4 October , Darwin warned him, ‘I read

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … (1) Alberts, Karl (4) Alberts, Maurice …
  • … (2) Allman, G. J. (4) Althaus, Julius …
  • … (1) Bailey, W. W. (4) Baillie, A. F. …
  • … (1) Behrens, Wilhelm (4) Beke, C. T. …
  • … (1) Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte …
  • … (1) Bianconi, G. G. (4) Bibliogr. Inst. …
  • … (8) Blackwall, John (4) Blackwell, A. L. B. …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 24 hits

  • Re: DesignAdaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and othersby Craig
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring
  • Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the dress of a modern day
  • Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as a sort
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwinmade his home on the border of the little
  • are kept in check by a constitutional weakness. DARWIN: A plain but comfortable brick
  • except that of vigorous healthDARWIN4   My confounded stomach. GRAY: …
  • ideas. A younger Asa Gray (now in his mid 40s) arrives in his Harvard study and removes his
  • DARWIN22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin
  • but I think an owl really might go in storm in this time 400 or 500 miles. Owls and Hawks have often
  • …   I daresay I may be quite in error: GRAY:   40   … what you say about extinction… …
  • to unfold more. Gray pushes for elaboration. 41   Your letters are always most
  • the inner circle. He preamblesDARWIN43   My dear Gray. Permit me to tell you, …
  • Darwin draws a deep breath. To business: 44   Nineteen years ago it occurred to me
  • which fever ultimately proves fatal. GRAY:   45   Philosophically, [I am] a convinced
  • Nicene, as the exponent of the Christian faith. 46   I believe in one God, the Father
  • for us under Pontius Pilate; … DARWIN47   My dear GrayIt is very unlikely, but
  • whose kingdom shall have no end. DARWIN:   48   So, all my originality, whatever it
  • paragraph, in which I quote and differ from you[r178   doctrine that each variation has been
  • ARTS AND SCIENCES, PROCEEDINGS XVII, 1882 4  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 10 MAY 1848

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 24 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • a holiday in the Lake District in August did little to raise Darwins spirits. ‘I wish that my
  • W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] ). From July, Darwin had an additional worry: the
  • that his grandfather had felt the same way. In 1792, Erasmus Darwin had written: ‘The worst thing I
  • all over like a baked pear’ ( enclosure in letter from R. W. Dixon, 20 December 1879 ). The year
  • contained a warmer note and the promise of future happiness: Darwin learned he was to be visited by
  • nice and good as could be’ ( letter from Karl Beger, [ c. 12 February 1879] ). The masters of
  • of the Admiralty described the unknown young man asA M r Darwin grandson of the well known
  • me’, Darwin wrote enthusiastically to Reginald Darwin on 4 April , declaring that reading it was
  • him on 9 June not toexpend much powder & shot on M r  Butler’, for he really was not worth
  • leaving Darwinmore perplexed than ever about life of D r . D’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, 12
  • independent of him as possible’, Francis told Darwin on 4 July, after reporting that he had
  • with Ubba about your return’, Darwin wrote to Francis on 4 July , ‘He saidit is likely he will
  • the highest point, for hiswhy”—“what for” &c are incessant’, Darwin joked on 2 July (first
  • neither cross nor ennuied’ (Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [4 August 1879] (DAR 219.1: 125)). Darwin
  • which is his profession thonot a profitable one; also D r  C[lark]’s opinion that he was so
  • has opposed it’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [4 August 1879] (DAR 219.1: 125)). Nothing
  • … ‘to be planted in my honour!’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 4 November [1879] ). While in Coniston, …
  • greatly amused Darwin, who felt it wasvery acute of M r  Ruskin to know that I feel a deep & …
  • frog be published in Nature ( letter to J. N. Lockyer, 4 and 6 March [1879] ). When Darwins
  • and preventCattle diseases, Potato diseases &c’, probably did not know that Darwin had already

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 21 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. Darwins transmutation theory continued to
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of
  • in August. There was also a serious dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and
  • jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin was ready to submit his paper on
  • a sudden illness. Falconer was 56, almost the same age as Darwin himself. Falconer had seconded
  • improvement to Joness diet ( see letter to T. H. Huxley, 4 October [1865] ). It was not until
  • for the press in the autumn’ ( letter to John Murray, 4 April [1865] ). In early June, he wrote to
  • from the Linnean Society ( letter to [Richard Kippist], 4 June [1865] ). The paper was published
  • Darwin had received a copy of Müllers bookFür Darwin , a study of the Crustacea with reference
  • … … inheritance, reversion, effects of use & disuse &c’, and which he intended to publish in
  • to high scientific account’ (A. Gray 18656, pp. 273-4). Darwin had also written to Gray on 19
  • for him to read attentively ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [4 June 1865] ). The fact that
  • He wrote to Hooker, ‘I doubt whether you or I or any one c d  do any good in healing this breach. …
  • Hookers behalf, ‘He asks if you saw the article of M r . Croll in the last Reader on the
  • keep out of contact with him’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 4 May [1865] ). Darwin contributed
  • … ‘As for your thinking that you do not deserve the C[opley] Medal,’ he rebuked Hooker, ‘that I

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Charles Darwins daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and
  • 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University
  • excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwins letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwins own discussion of religious belief in
  • of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his
  • of emotion (see letters from F. J. Wedgwood to H. E. and C. R. Darwin, [186772],  letter   nos. …
  • one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and
  • period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the
  • Two Mission priests Mr. Maclagan 3 & Mr. Wilkinson 4 had the bulk of the work. …
  • amongst whom of course was Lena had any knowledge of it. M r . W. spoke or preached as u like to
  • them of a higher lifeThe plan of the Mission is 3 or 4 services every day in the church with one
  • Father who w d  be waiting for herwhen down came M r . W. on his knees between them & said, …
  • worship of humanitythis I hope is only in its budI c d  conceive a life wh. was filled & …
  • taking away what they have no equivalent for. July 4th 1871. How hard it is to wait
  • his voice   10 years on how will it be when we are 50 & 40 respectively. Supposing we do not
  • Hampshire Advertiser , 21 January 1871, p. 7. 4 Probably John Bourdieu Wilkinson . …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 25 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • published in Paris (in 2 vols.), so long ago as 1839 4  [Pierquin de Gembloux 1839]. Said to
  • 1838] Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. Lawrence 1819] read Bory
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • et anim: on sleep & movements of plants  £ 1 ..s  4. [Dutrochet 1837] Voyage aux
  • in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on Geog. distrib: of Brit: …
  • observations on increase & decrease of different diseases 4 to . 1801 [Heberden 1801] quoted
  • worth reading [Dampier 1697] Sportsmans repository 4 to . [W. H. Scott 1820]— contains
  • Audubons Ornithol: Biography [Audubon 18319]— 4 Vols. well worth reading [DAR *119: 4v.] …
  • Wiegman has pub. German pamphlet on crossing oats &c [Wiegmann 1828] Horticultural
  • M me  Necker on Education [A. A. Necker 183943]— preeminently worth studying in a metaphys. point
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 25 hits

  • The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his
  • book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwins time for the rest of the year was devoted
  • way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from
  • offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be
  • a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate centred on Darwins evolutionary account of the
  • taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases
  • year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression. Darwin continued to investigate the
  • also brought a significant milestone for the family, as Darwins eldest daughter Henrietta was
  • during several past years, has been a great amusement’. Darwin had been working fairly continuously
  • work on species theory in the late 1830s. In recent years, Darwin had collected a wealth of material
  • to human evolution was comparatively small, reflecting Darwins aim of  showing kinship with animals
  • he istorn to piecesby people wanting copies’, Darwin wrote to his son Francis on 28 February
  • letter from J. D. Hooker, 26 March 1871 ). The profits for Darwin were considerable. After
  • man.’ Promoting the book As usual, Darwin did his best to obtain a wide and favourable
  • … (see Correspondence vol. 19Appendix IV). Four of Darwins five sons received a copy, and his
  • received a special acknowledgment in the form of a gift. Darwin credited her for whatever he had
  • and the heavy use of their arms and legs ( letter from C. L. Bernays, 25 February 1871 ). Samples
  • is a thing which I sh d  feel very proud of, if anyone c d . say of me.’ After the publication
  • was achieved throughthe medium of opinion, positive law &c’, and transmitted by culture, not
  • in the world except. laughing. crying grinning pouting &c. &c’, he wrote to Hooker on 21
  • produce physiological changes ( letter from Michael Foster, 4 June [1871] ). Pangenesis
  • so giddy I can hardly sit up, so no more’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 4 August [1871] ). On 23
  • annually on an acre of land at 16 tons (letter from L. C. Wedgwood, [20 November 1871] ). He also
  • … ( letter to Asa Gray, 16 July [1871] , letter to S. R. S. Norton, 23 November [1871] ). …
  • good as twice refined gold’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 September [1871] ). The months

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Darwin in letters, 1882: Nothing too great or too small

Summary

In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous October, and for the first time in decades he was not working on another book. He remained active in botanical research, however. Building on his recent studies in plant…

Matches: 22 hits

  • In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous
  • for scientific colleagues or their widows facing hardship. Darwin had suffered from poor health
  • of his scientific friends quickly organised a campaign for Darwin to have greater public recognition
  • Botanical observation and experiment had long been Darwins greatest scientific pleasure. The year
  • Müller, 1 January 1882 , and letter to Fritz Müller, 4 January 1882 ). These were topics that
  • working at the effects of Carbonate of Ammonia on roots,’ Darwin wrote, ‘the chief result being that
  • contents, if immersed for some hours in a weak solution of C. of Ammonia’. Darwins interest in root
  • London on 6 and 16 March, respectively. In January, Darwin corresponded with George John
  • letter from Arthur de Souza Corrêa, 28 December 1881 ). Darwin had a long-running interest in such
  • experiments had been conducted to lend support to Darwins theory of pangenesis (see
  • in apposition’, was read at the Linnean Society on 4 May, but not published. Darwin carried
  • which are asymmetric, thus facilitating cross-fertilisation. Darwins aim, he said, was just to
  • 3 April 1882 ). Earthworms and evolution Darwins last book, Earthworms , had been
  • Appendix V). The conservative Quarterly Review , owned by Darwins publisher John Murray, carried
  • of the newspaper press’ ( letter from A. T. Rice, 4 February 1882 ). Rice looked to Darwin to
  • our homes, would in this case greatly suffer’ ( letter to C. A. Kennard, 9 January 1882 ). Kennard
  • judged, intellectually his inferior, please ( letter from C. A. Kennard, 28 January 1882 ). …
  • Jamaicafor complete rest’ ( letter to Anthony Rich, 4 February 1882 ). Horace had settled in
  • dull aching in the chest’ (Emma Darwin to G. H. Darwin, [ c . 28 March 1882] (DAR 210.3: 45)). …
  • to some Estancia,’ wrote Hughes, ‘as the scenery &c. will amply repay your trouble’ ( letter
  • where he had witnessed an earthquake in 1835 ( letter from R. E. Alison, [MarchJuly 1835 ]). …
  • will be months before I am able to work’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [ c . 10 April 1864] ). To

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • fertilise plants in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • … “enthusiasm and indomitable patience”. Letter 4242 - Hildebrand, F. H. G. to Darwin
  • contained ina little treatise”. Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27
  • Letter 5705 - Haast, J. F. J. von to Darwin, [4 December 1867] Explorer and geologist
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • Letter 3681  - Wedgwood, M. S. to Darwin, [before 4 August 1862] Darwins niece, …
  • her sisters while on holiday in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, …
  • Letter 8144 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [5 January 1872] Darwin asks his niece, …
  • steep slopes with blunt knitting needles. Letter 4235 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [8
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 9606 - Harrison, L. C. to Darwin, [22 August 1874] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • through the Sikkim Himalaya and Tibet. Letter 4139  - Darwin, W. E. to Darwin, [4
  • Letter 1701