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Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 18 hits

  • On 14 May 1856, Charles Darwin recorded in his journal that heBegan by Lyells
  • in his immediate circle were Charles Lyell and Joseph Dalton Hooker, who were joined in 1856 by
  • only source of information about his preoccupations during 1856 and 1857. They reveal little noticed
  • might work in nature ( letter from Charles Lyell, 12 May 1856, n. 10 ). He was surprised that no
  • way before. ‘How very odd it is that no zoologist sh  d . ever have thought it worth while to look
  • to make my Book as perfect as ever I can.’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 8 February [1857] ). …
  • on plants. Expanding projects set up during 1855 and 1856 (see  Correspondence  vol. 5), he tried
  • first two chapters of his species book, completed by October 1856 (‘Journal’; Appendix II). …
  • Gray, vary in the United States ( letter to Asa Gray, 2 May 1856 )? What about weeds? Did they
  • than their lowland relatives. But a last-minute check with Hooker revealed that Darwin was mistaken: …
  • pretty effectuallycomplained Darwin in 1857 ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [2 May 1857] ). …
  • calculations and different ways of working, in letters to Hooker, Gray, and Watson. The results
  • hermaphrodite’ ( letter to to T. H. Huxley, 1 July [1856] ), which became a source of amusement in
  • an equally difficult problem that he took in turn to Watson, Hooker, George Bentham, and the Belfast
  • show a separation of the sexes, a proposal that Asa Gray and Hooker confirmed during the course of
  • zoological gardens in London. As he cheerfully explained to Hooker: ‘I must tell you another of my  …
  • bird had naturally eaten have grown well.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 10 December [1856] ). …
  • Lyell had pressed him to write up his views ( letters to J. D. Hooker, 9 May [1856] ). …

Darwin and Fatherhood

Summary

Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and over the next seventeen years the couple had ten children. It is often assumed that Darwin was an exceptional Victorian father. But how extraordinary was he? The Correspondence Project allows an unusually…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … many more railway lines were built to the area (Darwin to J. D. Hooker,  8 April [1856] ). This …
  • … period, as Darwin’s attempts to comfort his friend Joseph Hooker on the death of his six-year-old …
  • … his son William,  [30 October 1858] ). In one letter in 1856, he explained his paternal feelings …
  • … in this world.’ (Darwin to Syms Covington,  9 March 1856 ) In the late nineteenth century, …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 19 hits

  • writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring Gray Louis Agassiz, Adam
  • this actor uses the words of Jane Loring Gray, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Hugh Falconer, Louis Agassiz, …
  • of natural selection to his friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles
  • year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a part of
  • DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have beenengaged in a very presumptuous work
  • the opportunity I enjoyed of making your acquaintance at Hookers three years ago; and besides that
  • sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind
  • 22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin and Gray by
  • species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how pleased I am
  • on your bowels of immutability. Darwin passes to Hooker a brace of letters 25
  • there is a little rap for you. GRAY:   26   Hooker [is] dreadfully paradoxical to
  • as well as any man. I send itDarwin passes to Hooker an envelope of seeds. …
  • and Hawks have often been seen in mid Atlantic. HOOKER:   28   Thanks for your letter
  • pleased to have. DARWIN33   My dear Hooker. Thanks, also, for [your] Photograph, …
  • expression and so by no means does you justice. HOOKER:   34   I believe I have very
  • beguiled into shouldrileyou, as you say it doesHooker rightly tells me, I have no business to
  • 21 JULY 1855 14  C DARWIN TO A GRAY, 14 JULY 1856 15  A GRAY TO C DARWIN
  • 1855 23  JD HOOKER TO C DARWIN, 9 NOVEMBER 1856 24  C DARWIN TO JD
  • C DARWIN, 1819 AUGUST 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150

Origin

Summary

Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of his wish to establish priority for the species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856…

Matches: 22 hits

  • to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856 that he publish a short version of his
  • in the Linnean Societys journal , Joseph Dalton Hooker urged Darwin to prepare a longer abstract
  • length to just 30 pages of the Linnean Journal . In reply, Hooker provided reassurance by
  • supplemental numberof the journalBy this point, Hooker had also read the draft section of the
  • in persuading Darwin not to publish an abstract in 1856 , Darwin explained to whole affair to him
  • exact theory; & asking me to show it to Lyell. The latter & Hooker have taken on themselves
  • Abstract & I find it amusing & improving workhe told Hooker. ‘I hated the thought of the
  • also heard from John Stevens Henslow, his old mentor and Hookers father-in-law, who clearly had
  • … ‘I will try not to be too diffusivehe assured Hooker, ‘ I fear it will spoil all interest in my
  • you have done me in making me make this abstract’, he told Hooker, ’ for though I thought I had got
  • he actively sought criticism from trusted readers like Hooker, Lyell, and Thomas Henry Huxley. He
  • … & even contemptthat he momentarily forgot that Hooker was theone living soulwho was
  • that hisspeculations were ajam pot ”’ to HookerIndeed, when Hooker was writing his essay on
  • Chapter on transmigration of forms across tropics ’. When Hookers essay was published in 1859, it
  • will end by being perverted .’ The effect of Darwin of Hookers views were apparent when he
  • younger  men converts. My neighbour & excellent naturalist JLubbock is enthusiastic convert. …
  • on geographical distribution that Darwin had sent to Hooker for comments were accidentally placed in
  • chapters copied again. Darwin, however, bemoaned the loss of Hookers comments more than the time, …
  • dreamt that my Book was  entertaining ’, he wrote to Hooker, ‘ that dream is pretty well over
  • on 3 October, ‘& right glad I am that I did my best with Hooker to persuade you to publish it
  • partly by my Book & partly by their own reflexions, I sh d . feel that the subject was safe; …
  • of O rigin, which, he stated, ‘ if there be 2 d . Edit. I will attend to. ’ Darwin was

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 12 hits

  • for evaluation, and persuaded his friend Joseph Dalton Hooker to comment on a paper on  Verbascum
  • committed suicide at the end of April; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic
  • thriving, and when illness made work impossible, Darwin and Hooker read a number of novels, and
  • the Boys at home: they make the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin
  • kind friend to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] ). However, …
  • griefs & pains: these alone are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865 ). …
  • Sic transit gloria mundi, with a vengeance’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] ). …
  • know it is folly & nonsense to try anyone’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). He
  • and Darwin had given it up by early July ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865] ). In
  • … ‘able to write about an hour on most days’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 22 December [1865] ). …
  • willing to bear the expense of the woodcuts ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). After
  • loathe the whole subject like tartar emetic’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 19 January [1865] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … ‘some Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] . …
  • … the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once thought Lyell …
  • … that the colleague and friend who had first advised him in 1856 to write his essay on species could …
  • … lack of expertise in the subject. ‘The worst of it is’, Hooker wrote to Darwin, ‘I suppose it is …
  • … credit to his own research and that of Joseph Prestwich. Hooker wrote: ‘I fear L. will get scant …
  • … had contributed to the proofs of human antiquity. Darwin and Hooker repeatedly exchanged regrets …

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 10 hits

  • tapping into the networks of others, such as Joseph Dalton Hooker and Asa Gray, who were at leading
  • of face-to-face contact. His correspondence with Joseph Hooker and Asa Gray illustrates how close
  • The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. Hooker. The second is between Darwin
  • to conclusion that species are not immutable. He admits to Hookerit is like confessing a murder”. …
  • Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] Darwin catches up on personal
  • name to specific name. Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 In
  • Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849 Darwin opens by discussing their
  • lamination of gneiss. Letter 1319Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 6 & 7 Apr 1850
  • Letter 1339Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 13 June [1850] Darwin writes to Hooker from his
  • Letter 1979Darwin, C. R. to Lubbock, John, 27 Oct [1856] Darwin provides detailed

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 27 hits

  • 4  [Pierquin de Gembloux 1839]. Said to be good by D r  L. Lindsay 5 [DAR *119: 1v. …
  • … [A. von Humboldt 1811] Richardsons Fauna Borealis [J. Richardson 182937] …
  • Brown 1814] & at the end of Congo voyage [R. Brown 1818]. (Hooker 923) 7  read
  • on Annals of Nat. Hist. [Jenyns 1838] Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. …
  • Teneriffe. in Pers. Narr. [A. von Humboldt 181429] D r  Royle on Himmalaya types [Royle
  • reference to authors about E. Indian Islands 8 consult D r  Horsfield [Horsfield 1824] …
  • sheep [Youatt 1831, 1834, 1837]. Verey Philosophie dHist. Nat. [Virey 1835] read
  • Paper on consciousness in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on
  • Crawford Eastern Archipelago [Crawfurd 1820] Raffeles d[itt]o [T. S. B. Raffles 1817] …
  • to White Nat. Hist of Selbourne [E. T. Bennett ed. 1837 and [J. Rennie] ed. 1833] read 19  : …
  • what have they written.? “Hunt” [J. Hunt 1806] p. 290
  • He is Horticulturist in France. Michaux, according to Hooker has written on topography of N. …
  • chiefly on distribution of forms said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith
  • Butler. 3. first sermons [Butler 1834] recommended by Sir. J. Mackintosh J. Long Moral Nature
  • … ]. many very useful papers for me:— not in Hort. Soc. Hooker? Rogets Bridgewater Treatise
  • … —— Mauritius & C. of Good Hope Hooker recommends order [Backhouse
  • Decandolles Veg: Organ: } recommended by  Hooker . [A. P. de
  • C. Watson 1845]— gives up permanent species (alluded to by Hooker) Foreign & British Med. …
  • 43 Lindleys Vegetable Kingdom [Lindley 1846]. Hooker says very good for my purpose
  • Phytologist [ Phytologistmust be read . Hooker. read Fortunes Travels in China
  • … [DAR *128: 160] Mansfields Paraguay [Mansfield 1856] } read Chesterton Prison Life
  • Hutchison Dog Breaking 3 d . Edit [Hutchinson 1856] new information on Pointer & Retriever
  • Annal des Sc. Nat. 4 th  Series. Bot. Vol 6 [Naudin 1856]. Read Notes to Jardine & …
  • 1855 Sept. Tegetmeier on Poultry [Tegetmeier 18567] —— 27 th . Mem. de lAcad. …
  • Das Ganze der Landwirttschaft [Kirchhof 1835].— 1856. Jan 10 th  G. Colin Traite de
  • … [Rudolphi 1812] [DAR 128: 16] 1856 Jan 21. Hucs Chinese Empire [Huc
  • Mar 1 Veith Naturgeschichte Haussaugethiere [Veith 1856].— 3 d  Knox Races of Man.— 1850 [R

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 17 hits

  • in South Africa. Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May 1869] …
  • of wormholes. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] …
  • Darwins behalf. Letter 8683 - Roberts, D. to Darwin, [17 December 1872] …
  • little treatise”. Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] …
  • and orangs. Letter 5705 - Haast, J. F. J. von to Darwin, [4 December 1867] …
  • in a marble tablet”. Letter 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John
  • Men: Letter 385  - Wedgwood, S. E. & J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] …
  • at Maer Hall, Staffordshire. Letter 1219  - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [3 February
  • …  - Henslow, G. to Darwin, [11 November 1865] J. S. Henslows son, George, passes on the
  • Men: Letter 1836  - Berkeley, M. J. to Darwin, [7 March 1856] Clergyman and
  • The experiments were carried outat the suggestion of Dr Hookerand what little he has ascertained
  • to feed to them. Letter 2069  - Tenant, J. to Darwin, [31 March 1857] James
  • University of Bonn. Letter 6046  - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] …
  • Women: Letter 2345 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [20 October 1858] Darwin
  • of style. Letter 2461  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] Darwin
  • as such”. Letter 2475  - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [2 July 1859] Darwin
  • Letter 1836  - Berkeley, M. J. to Darwin, [7 March 1856] Clergyman and botanist Miles

Thomas Henry Huxley

Summary

Dubbed “Darwin’s bulldog” for his combative role in controversies over evolution, Huxley was a leading Victorian zoologist, science popularizer, and education reformer. He was born in Ealing, a small village west of London, in 1825. With only two years of…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Cuvier, Richard Owen, and Louis Agassiz (see letters to J. D. Hooker, 9 May 1856 and 21 May 1856). …

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 22 hits

  • his views of close friends like Charles Lyell, Joseph Dalton Hooker, and Thomas Henry Huxley, who
  • at the end of 1859, ‘I sometimes fancied that my book w  d  be successful; but I never even built
  • made on you (whom I have always looked at as chief judge) & Hooker & Huxley. The whole has  …
  • work preparing hisbig bookon species. Begun in May 1856 at the urging of Lyell, the manuscript
  • the load of curious facts on record.—’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 31 January [1858] ). In addition to
  • the interpretation of the statistics was still problematic. Hooker thought that Darwin was wrong to
  • up. With some trepidation, Darwin sent his manuscript off to Hooker for his comments. Darwins
  • that all was much alike, & if you condemned that you w d . condemn allmy lifes work—& …
  • … ‘Your words have come true with a vengeance that I sh  d . be forestalled’, he lamented to Lyell. …
  • some time away. On 16 May [1858], he arranged a meeting with Hooker to discuss his manuscript on
  • be dreadfully severe.—’ On 18 [May 1858], he again tells Hooker: ‘There is not least hurry in world
  • work. The story has often been told of how Lyell and Hooker suggested that Darwins years of
  • 1857. The correspondence between Darwin, Lyell, and Hooker contains all of the extant letters
  • Society on 1 July 1858, including a letter from Wallace to Hooker thanking him and Lyell fortheir
  • III and IV.) You will, & so will M rs Hooker, be most sorry for us when you
  • his material would require asmall volume’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 October [1858] ). Begun
  • appropriated the others ideas (see letters to J. D. Hooker, 2 March [1859] , 11 March [1859] …
  • Fox, ‘& I feel worse than when I came’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, [16 November 1859] ). It was
  • about the fine points of Darwins theory ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 6 May 1859 ). Among the
  • Priests at me & leaves me to their mercies’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 November 1859] ). …
  • sort of instinct to try to make out truth’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 24 [March 1859] ). Yet he
  • young & rising naturalists on our side.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 December [1859] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 20 hits

  • specimens by the young botanist and traveller, Joseph Dalton Hooker. More than 1200 letters between
  • and Richard Owen shows. These friends, with the addition of Hooker, were important to Darwin for
  • Darwin discussed his ideas on species mutability with Hooker, Horner, Jenyns, Lyell, Owen, and
  • after their first exchange, early in 1844, Darwin told Hooker that he was engaged in avery
  • … (it is like confessing a murder) immutable’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [11 January 1844] ). Nine
  • heterodox opinions and later in the year both Jenyns and Hooker were invited to read a manuscript
  • In the event, it was not until the beginning of 1847 that Hooker was given a fair copy of the essay
  • attributed the book to him. But, as his letters to Hooker show, Darwin carefully considered and then
  • Forbes, and Owen were deleted, Henslows was queried, and J. D. Hookers was added. Much later, by
  • on species ( Natural selection ), he had decided that Hooker was by far the best man for the task
  • an argument against the French palaeontologist Alcide dOrbigny, insisting that the vast pampas
  • Journal of researches , and his species work. Joseph Hooker and the Beagle plant
  • and apparently relieved to handover Darwins plants to Hooker, who had just returned from
  • of the Southern Hemisphere. Darwin was quick to spot in Hooker a man he judged could become the
  • laws of creation, Geographical Distribution’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 February 1845] ) and
  • and European botanists. Darwins questions challenged Hooker to apply his particular knowledge to
  • that is not touched upon in their correspondence. Hookers observations on classification provided
  • that of Waterhouse with respect to the animal kingdom. Hooker was also ready to discuss contemporary
  • from each other. The letters also document aspects of Hookers life: his search for a paid position, …
  • … - Darwin's work on barnacles It was also Hooker who helped Darwin in the first stages of

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 21 hits

  • … `big book’,  Natural selection , begun in 1856Coming hard on the heels of  The descent of man
  • Darwins best efforts, set the final price at 7 s.  6 d.  ( letter from RFCooke, 12
  • as I can make it’, he wrote to the translator ( letter to JJMoulinié, 23 September 1872 ). He
  • anatomist St George Jackson Mivart ( letter to St GJMivart,  11 January [1872] ). A
  • am made to appear’, complained Darwin ( letter to St GJMivart, 5 January 1872 ). Piqued, …
  • … `fundamental intellectual errors’ ( letter from St GJMivart, 6 January 1872 ). Darwin
  • to think he felt friendly towards me’ ( letter to St GJMivart, 8 January [1872] ).  Despite
  • if only `in another world’ ( letter from St GJMivart,  10 January 1872 ).  Darwin, determined
  • …  but asked Mivart not to acknowledge it ( letter to St GJMivart, 11 January [1872] ). 'I
  • selection is somewhat under a cloud’, he wrote to JETaylor on 13 January , and he complained
  • rather than offended by `that clever book’ ( letter to JMHerbert, 21 November 1872 ) and
  • dispute involving his close friend Joseph Dalton Hooker came to a headHooker, director of the
  • system in the glasshouses had escalated to the point where Hooker applied over Ayrtons head direct
  • your enemies be cursed, is my pious frame of mind Hookers cause was taken up by his
  • the independence of science from bureaucratic interference. Hooker had kept Darwin well informed: …
  • was Darwins wholeheartedly partisan reply ( letter to JDHooker, 14 May 1872 ). On 13 June, a
  • to make one turn into an old honest Tory’ ( letter to JDHooker, 12 July [1872] ). …
  • own muscles when attending women in labour ( letter from JTRothrock, 25 November 1872 ); …
  • of the microscope led his head to `fail’ ( letter to WDFox, 29 October [1872] ) he had begun
  • by hearing about Panagæus!’ Darwin wrote ( letter to WDFox,  16 July [1872] ).  I
  • my life which surprised & gratified me more’ ( letter to JMHerbert, 21 November 1872 ).  …

The writing of "Origin"

Summary

From a quiet rural existence at Down in Kent, filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on the transmutation of species, Darwin was jolted into action in 1858 by the arrival of an unexpected letter (no longer extant) from Alfred Russel Wallace outlining a…

Matches: 20 hits

  • When I was in spirits I sometimes fancied that my book w d  be successful; but I never even built
  • not mean the sale, but the impression it has made on you…& Hooker & Huxley. The whole has
  • work preparing hisbig bookon species. Begun in May 1856 at the urging of Lyell, the manuscript
  • the load of curious facts on record.—’ (letter to W. D. Fox, 31 January [1858] ). In addition to
  • the interpretation of the statistics was still problematic. Hooker thought that Darwin was wrong to
  • up. With some trepidation, Darwin sent his manuscript off to Hooker for his comments. Darwins
  • that all was much alike, & if you condemned that you w  d . condemn allmy lifes work—& …
  • … ‘Your words have come true with a vengeance that I sh  d . be forestalled’, he lamented to Lyell. …
  • time away. On 16 May [1858] , he arranged a meeting with Hooker to discuss his manuscript on
  • severe.—’ On 18 [May 1858] , he again tells Hooker: ‘There is not least hurry in world about my M
  • work. The story has often been told of how Lyell and Hooker suggested that Darwins years of
  • 1857. The correspondence between Darwin, Lyell, and Hooker in this volume contains all of the extant
  • 1858. It also includes an unpublished letter from Wallace to Hooker thanking him and Lyell for
  • his material would require asmall volume’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, 12 October [1858] ). Begun
  • to Fox, ‘& I feel worse than when I came’ (letter to W. D. Fox, [16 November 1859] ). It was
  • could produce all the effects Darwin ascribed to it. Hooker, though very much a convert, still
  • his theory. He often said that if he could convince Lyell, Hooker, and Huxley, he would rest content
  • the Priests at me & leaves me to their mercies’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 November 1859] ) …
  • a sort of instinct to try to make out truth’ (letter to W. D. Fox, 24 [March 1859] ). Yet he
  • all young & rising naturalists on our side.—’ (letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 December [1859] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1851-1855: Death of a daughter

Summary

The letters from these years reveal the main preoccupations of Darwin’s life with a new intensity. The period opens with a family tragedy in the death of Darwin’s oldest and favourite daughter, Anne, and it shows how, weary and mourning his dead child,…

Matches: 7 hits

  • in zoological matters, just as he did on Joseph Dalton Hookers in botany. Moreover, this circle of
  • in his health was indicated by his comment in a letter to Hooker on 29 [May 1854] : ‘Very far
  • also drawing the botanist Miles Joseph Berkeley, his friend Hooker, and various readers of the
  • such speculative, large-scale geological changes. As he told Hooker in a letter of 5 June [1855] …
  • arguments for the dispersal of animals and plants with Hooker who, with Charles Lyell and Edward
  • out his species essay in full. In 1850, he had written to Hooker ( Correspondence  vol. 4, …
  • is perverse & will not do as I wish it’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 7 May [1855] ). But, whether

Sexual selection

Summary

Although natural selection could explain the differences between species, Darwin realised that (other than in the reproductive organs themselves) it could not explain the often marked differences between the males and females of the same species.  So what…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … Darwin with information and bird specimens since at least 1856, read  Origin  through at least …
  • … females are worn not by men but women, and he joked with Hooker about the consequences of both …