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Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 22 hits

  • On 14 May 1856, Charles Darwin recorded in his journal that heBegan by Lyells advice  writing
  • by the preparation of this manuscript. Although advised by Lyell to publish only a brief outline
  • material into such a small compass and soon abandoned Lyells idea in favour of a full-length work
  • this process. Still prominent in his immediate circle were Charles Lyell and Joseph Dalton Hooker, …
  • only source of information about his preoccupations during 1856 and 1857. They reveal little noticed
  • and other domesticated animals. As Darwin explained to Lyell, his studies, particularly those on
  • of how selection might work in nature ( letter from Charles Lyell, 12 May 1856, n. 10 ). He was
  • remarked to Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 8 September [1856] ). I mean to make my
  • on plants. Expanding projects set up during 1855 and 1856 (see  Correspondence  vol. 5), he tried
  • first two chapters of his species book, completed by October 1856 (‘Journal’; Appendix II). …
  • Gray, vary in the United States ( letter to Asa Gray, 2 May 1856 )? What about weeds? Did they
  • hermaphrodite’ ( letter to to T. H. Huxley, 1 July [1856] ), which became a source of amusement in
  • that Asa Gray and Hooker confirmed during the course of 1856. Science at home: the botanical
  • many different experiments on plants through the summers of 1856 and 1857, particularly with garden
  • to William Erasmus Darwin, [26 February 1856] and to Charles Lyell, 3 May [1856] ). …
  • 21 [July 1857] ). The problem of careers for his six boys (Charles Waring Darwin, the sixth and
  • writing in part to establish his priority in this area, for Charles Lyell thought that Wallaces
  • All the available material seems to indicate that it was Lyell rather than Darwin who feared the
  • Darwins manuscript on species was begun only after Lyell had urged him to publish a preliminary
  • given on an occasion other than the one previously supposed. Charles and Mary Elizabeth Lyell
  • up to London to see Lyell to discuss it further ( letter to Charles Lyell, 3 May [1856] ). It was
  • not embrace the whole Lamarckian doctrine.’ ( letter from Charles Lyell, 12 May 1856, n. 7 ). The

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 21 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • by the publication in February of books by his friends Charles Lyell, the respected geologist, and
  • Britains scientific circles following the publication of Lyells and Huxleys books. Three
  • Origin had (see  Correspondence  vol. 8, letter to Charles Lyell, 10 January [1860] ). In the
  • with animals now extinct had been rapidly accumulating. Lyells argument for a greater human
  • as well as on evidence collected earlier in the century. Lyells  Antiquity of man  and Huxleys  …
  • arguments for species change. In this context, Lyells discussion of the origin of species
  • that of inferior animals made himgroan’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Darwin
  • out that species were not separately created’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 17 March [1863] ). Public
  • worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once thought Lyellcould do more to convert the Public
  • February [1863] ). Darwin did not relish telling Lyell of his disappointment; when he did
  • you, as my old honoured guide & master’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). …
  • stronger statements regarding species change ( letter from Charles Lyell, 11 March 1863 ). The
  • letter to J. D. Dana, 20 February [1863] , and letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). …
  • bookfrom which he hadgained nothing’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 1213 March [1863] ). …
  • that the Public shall see how far you go’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 April [1863] ). …
  • international interest in his theory ( see letter to Charles Lyell, 17 March [1863] ). In January
  • from Hooker that the French botanists Joseph Decaisne and Charles Naudin thought little of his
  • from T. H. Huxley, 25 February 1863 , and letter to Charles Lyell, 1213 March [1863] ). …
  • and the United States by Grays father-in-law, the lawyer Charles Greely Loring ( see letter to Asa
  • September 1863] ). When the Darwins returned home, Charles fared little better, and most

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 15 hits

  • … 1 Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by …
  • … from the correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, …
  • … following: Actor 1 – Asa Gray Actor 2 – Charles Darwin Actor 3 – In the dress …
  • … the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwin… made his home on the border …
  • … the year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a …
  • … at the expense of Agassiz. DARWIN:   20   Lyell told me, that Agassiz, having a …
  • … – to be false… Yours most sincerely and gratefully Charles Darwin. CREED AND FEVER: 1858 …
  • … forgetfuless of your darling. BOOKS BY THE LATE CHARLES DARWIN: 1863-1865 In which …
  • … and officially die. And then publish books ‘by the late Charles Darwin’. Darwin takes up …
  • …   173   Ever yours cordially (though an Englishman) Charles Darwin. GRAY:  174   …
  • … at an unexpected and probably transient notoriety… Charles Darwin died on the 19th April …
  • … 21 JULY 1855 14  C DARWIN TO A GRAY, 14 JULY 1856 15  A GRAY TO C DARWIN …
  • … 1855 23  JD HOOKER TO C DARWIN, 9 NOVEMBER 1856 24  C DARWIN TO JD …
  • … GRAY TO JD HOOKER, 18 FEBRUARY 1861 115 A GRAY TO CHARLES WRIGHT, 17 APRIL 1862 …
  • … TO ASA GRAY 20 APRIL 1863 174 FROM A GRAY TO CHARLES DARWIN, 24 JULY 1865 …

Charles Lyell

Summary

As an author, friend and correspondent, Charles Lyell played a crucial role in shaping Darwin's scientific life. Born to a wealthy gentry family in Scotland in 1797, Lyell had a classical and legal education but by the 1820s had become entranced by…

Matches: 10 hits

  • As an author, friend and correspondent, Charles Lyell played a crucial role in shaping Darwin's
  • than that allowed for by traditional Biblical criticismLyell believed, however, that the subject
  • that could be viewed in action at the present timeIn Lyell's view, this ruled out any sudden
  • to keep up with the subsidence of the ocean floorAlthough Lyell had originally suggested a
  • Darwin always believed that his books 'came half out of Lyell's brains'. The
  • against the transmutation of one species into another. (Lyell even suggested that looking for long
  • the incomplete character of the fossil record.) Darwin told Lyell of his species work in a letter
  • Alfred Russel Wallace did propose similar views, Lyell (with Joseph Hooker) engineered the &#039
  • in 1858. Darwin's views posed a terrible paradox for LyellIn his view, what set humans
  • from other forms of lifeAfter an agonized struggle, Lyell did come round to accepting a limited

Origin

Summary

Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of his wish to establish priority for the species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856 that he publish a short version of his …
  • … in persuading Darwin not to publish an abstract in 1856 , Darwin explained to whole affair to him …
  • … concern now was to find a suitable publisher, and once again Lyell came to his aid. In late March, …
  • … of Darwin’s work. In light of this, Darwin asked Lyell whether he should ‘tell Murray that my Book …
  • … you on the same terms as those on which I publish for Sir Charles Lyell ’. Darwin was uneasy. …
  • … & God knows I have never shirked a difficulty’, he told Lyell on 20 September 1859, ‘ I am …
  • … in this life. ’ ‘I have just finished your volume’, Lyell told Darwin on 3 October, ‘& right …
  • … facts on which you ground so many grand generalizations.’ Lyell not only thought Darwin’s book ‘ a …
  • … 14 to 21 September 1859. Darwin was confident that in time Lyell would be ‘ per verted’, telling …
  • … Selection is in the main safe ’. Darwin reassured Lyell on 11 October that he was aware that …
  • … in doing ’. By late October, Hooker assured Darwin that Lyell was becoming a convert. Darwin was …

Dates of composition of Darwin's manuscript on species

Summary

Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s manuscript on species (DAR 8--15.1, inclusive; transcribed and published as Natural selection). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s …
  • … as Natural selection ). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by June 1858. At …
  • … summary of Wallace’s theory of transmutation ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). Darwin …
  • … 2 13 October 1856 [Variation under domestication] [2] …
  • … 11 13 October 1856 Geographical distribution (DAR 14; …
  • … 3 16 December 1856 On the possibility of all organic …

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 21 hits

  • as he jokingly called it) to his views of close friends like Charles Lyell, Joseph Dalton Hooker, …
  • concepts of creation. ‘When I was in spirits’, he told Lyell at the end of 1859, ‘I sometimes
  • infinitely  exceeded my wildest hopes.—’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 25 [November 1859] ). This
  • work preparing hisbig bookon species. Begun in May 1856 at the urging of Lyell, the manuscript
  • his reason or his own opinion. Hewett Cottrell Watson and Charles Cardale Babington thought that in
  • and dismay is evident in the letter he subsequently wrote to Charles Lyell, as Wallace had requested
  • his terms now stand as Heads of my Chapters.’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). …
  • Following Francis DarwinLL 2: 11617) and relying on Charles Lyells endorsement, the editors
  • Then, on 18 June he forwarded Wallaces paper to Lyell (Brooks 1984, pp. 2623). It is of some
  • who is distressed, as Darwin clearly was in his letter to Lyell, at the prospect of losing priority
  • Gray in September 1857. The correspondence between Darwin, Lyell, and Hooker contains all of the
  • including a letter from Wallace to Hooker thanking him and Lyell fortheir kind offices on this
  • was during the days immediately following his letter to Lyell. On 18 June 1858, his eldest daughter, …
  • with scarlet fever, currently sweeping through the village. Charles Waring Darwins condition
  • work. Again, he called upon Lyell for advice ( letter to Charles Lyell, 28 March [1859] ). Lyell
  • from the title of the forthcoming book ( letter to Charles Lyell, 30 March [1859] ). Darwin next
  • on the origin of species and varieties’ (letters to Charles Lyell, 28 March [1859] , and to
  • selection thelaw of higgledy-piggledy’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, [10 December 1859] ). To each
  • convinced. Darwin was particularly interested in Charles Lyells response to his theory. He
  • on  Origin  by acelebrated author and divine’ (Charles Kingsley) thatit is just as noble a
  • the lacunas w h . he himself had made’ ( letter from Charles Kingsley, 18 November 1859 ). This

Descent

Summary

There are more than five hundred letters associated with the research and writing of Darwin’s book, Descent of man and selection in relation to sex (Descent). They trace not only the tortuous route to eventual publication, but the development of Darwin’s…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … concealed it . Just weeks after publication he wrote to Charles Lyell, ‘ I show that I believe man …
  • … is in fact impossible to doubt it ’. At the time, Lyell was himself writing about human …
  • … research notes, including letters going back to at least 1856 . Among them were accounts of …

Language: key letters

Summary

How and why language evolved bears on larger questions about the evolution of the human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the development of human speech from animal sounds in The Descent of Man (1871),…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … continents.” Letter 3054: Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 2 Feb [1861] If the …
  • … were separately created. Darwin writes to the geologist Charles Lyell about the views of the Harvard …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 28 hits

  • by H. W. Rutherford ( Catalogue of the library of Charles Darwin now in the Botany School, …
  • Louisiana [darby 1816] & Finch Travels [Finch 1833]. (Lyell) Maximilian in Brazil [Wied
  • of Mexico [W. H. Prescott 1843], strongly recommended by Lyell (read) Berkeleys Works
  • 1844] L d  Cloncurry Memm [Lawless 1849] Lady Lyell Sir J Heads Forest scenes in
  • round world 18036 [Lisyansky 1814]— nothing Lyells Elements of Geology [Lyell 1838] …
  • J 57  Brownes Religio Medici [T. Browne 1643] Lyells Book III 5th Edit 58  [Lyell 1837] …
  • … —— 30 th  Lyells Principles. 3. Vol. 6 th  Edit [Lyell 1840]— references at end.— April 6
  • abstracted 22 d  Lyells Elem. 2 d  Edit. [Lyell 1841] d[itt]o.— Jan 3 d . …
  • Miserable Aug. 5 th  Lyells Travels in N. America [Lyell 1845] Oct. Cosmos [A. von
  • … [DAR *128: 160] Mansfields Paraguay [Mansfield 1856] } read Chesterton Prison Life
  • Hutchison Dog Breaking 3 d . Edit [Hutchinson 1856] new information on Pointer & Retriever
  • Annal des Sc. Nat. 4 th  Series. Bot. Vol 6 [Naudin 1856]. Read Notes to Jardine & …
  • 1855 Sept. Tegetmeier on Poultry [Tegetmeier 18567] —— 27 th . Mem. de lAcad. …
  • Das Ganze der Landwirttschaft [Kirchhof 1835].— 1856. Jan 10 th  G. Colin Traite de
  • … [Rudolphi 1812] [DAR 128: 16] 1856 Jan 21. Hucs Chinese Empire [Huc
  • Mar 1 Veith Naturgeschichte Haussaugethiere [Veith 1856].— 3 d  Knox Races of Man.— 1850 [R
  • 174155] d[itt]o [DAR 128: 17] 1856 . Jan 28. Watts Life by Muirhead
  • … [Pepys 18489]— April 21 Sandwitt Kars [Sandwith 1856]. [DAR 128: 18] March
  • 18516] —— Wollaston on Variation [Wollaston 1856] F. Smith on Apidæ [F. Smith 1855] …
  • 1859]. (goodish) 1  The personal library of Charles Stokes from whom CD borrowed books
  • Erskine. 2 vols. London.  *119: 14 Babington, Charles Cardale. 1839Primitiæ floræ   …
  • of Useful Knowledge.) London.  *119: 13 Badham, Charles David. 1845Insect life . …
  • … [Abstract in DAR 205.3: 180.] 119: 21a Bell, Charles. 1806Essays on the anatomy of
  • of the London Clay . London.  *119: 12v. Brace, Charles Loring. 1852Hungary in 1851: …
  • life from 1838 to the present   time . Edited by John Charles Templer. 3 vols. London128: 9
  • … . 3 vols. Edinburgh and London128: 25 Bunbury, Charles James Fox. 1848Journal of a
  • nature of virtue . Cambridge.  *119: 13 Buxton, Charles. 1848Memoirs of Sir Thomas
  • Rural hours . 2 vols. London.  *119: 24 Coote, Charles. 1819The history of England, …

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 15 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and Charles Lyell . These events all inspired
  • claimed, important for his enjoyment of life. He wrote to Charles Lyell on 22 January [1865] , …
  • and those of Georges Louis Leclerc, comte de Buffon, and Charles Bonnet; Darwin wrote back: ‘I do
  • the Royal Society of Edinburgh criticising Origin . Like Charles Lyell, who wrote to Darwin on
  • for existence (ibid., pp. 27681). Darwin responded to Lyells account in some detail ( see letter
  • the correspondence. At the end of May, the dispute between Charles Lyell and John Lubbock over
  • human antiquity, adding a note to his preface asserting that Lyell in his  Antiquity of man , …
  • Natural History Review . He also cited a statement by Lyell in  Antiquity of man  that the pages
  • inadvertence’. Though Lubbock had raised the matter with Lyell before publishing, this statement, …
  • sent to Darwin and its enclosures have not been found, so Lyells letter to Hooker, which must have
  • Correspondence vol. 13. Hooker, while acknowledging Lyells fault, thought Lubbocks
  • of his must also have made the crisis particularly painful. Lyell had been to some extent his mentor
  • set up to support FitzRoys children ( see letter from Charles Shaw, 3 October 1865 ). …
  • are letters commenting on Origin , including two from Charles Lyell, who had been sent the proof

The writing of "Origin"

Summary

From a quiet rural existence at Down in Kent, filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on the transmutation of species, Darwin was jolted into action in 1858 by the arrival of an unexpected letter (no longer extant) from Alfred Russel Wallace outlining a…

Matches: 19 hits

  • infinitely exceeded my wildest hopes.— (letter to Charles Lyell25 [November 1859] ) …
  • work preparing hisbig bookon species. Begun in May 1856 at the urging of Lyell, the manuscript
  • his reason or his own opinion. Hewett Cottrell Watson and Charles Cardale Babington thought that in
  • and dismay is evident in the letter he subsequently wrote to Charles Lyell, as Wallace had requested
  • his terms now stand as Heads of my Chapters.’ (letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). …
  • Following Francis Darwin (LL2:11617) and relying on Charles Lyells endorsement, the editors have
  • Then, on 18 June he forwarded Wallaces paper to Lyell (Brooks 1984, pp. 2623). It is of some
  • who is distressed, as Darwin clearly was in his letter to Lyell, at the prospect of losing priority
  • Gray in September 1857. The correspondence between Darwin, Lyell, and Hooker in this volume contains
  • unpublished letter from Wallace to Hooker thanking him and Lyell fortheir kind offices on this
  • was during the days immediately following his letter to Lyell. On 18 June 1858, his eldest daughter, …
  • with scarlet fever, currently sweeping through the village. Charles Waring Darwins condition
  • to think of a publisher for the work. Again, he called upon Lyell for advice (letter to Charles
  • from the title of the forthcoming book (letter to Charles Lyell, 30 March [1859] ). Darwin next
  • essay on the origin of species and varieties’ (letters to Charles Lyell, 28 March [1859] , and to
  • selection thelaw of higgledy-piggledy’ (letter to Charles Lyell, [10 December 1859] ). To each
  • convinced. Darwin was particularly interested in Charles Lyells response to his theory. He
  • on  Origin  by acelebrated author and divine’ (Charles Kingsley) thatit is just as noble a
  • the lacunas w  h . he himself had made’ (letter from Charles Kingsley, 18 November 1859 ). This

Before Origin: the ‘big book’

Summary

Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the very day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles (Darwin's Journal). He had long considered the question of species. In 1842, he outlined a theory of transmutation in a…

Matches: 14 hits

  • naturalist Edward Forbes. Darwin declared to Hooker in July 1856y ou continental extensionists
  • him: none more so than that of his old friend, the geologist Charles Lyell, who, in May 1856, twenty
  • his theory ( Darwin's Journal ). Just a month earlier, Lyells brother-in-law Charles
  • Darwin also understood the urgency to publish and, following Lyells advice in May 1856, began to
  • without full details. ’ Writing to his cousin Fox in June 1856, Darwin openly confessed his fears
  • workhe haddesisted’. By November 1856, he had both good and bad news to report to Lyell: ‘ …
  • press. Although Darwin had decided in the autumn of 1856 to write only from the materials he
  • wrote ten and a half chapters of his Big Book between May 1856 and June 1858. With a total of
  • length ’, he had complained to Hooker in December 1856. By mid-1858, only the first chapter on
  • the Original Type', which Wallace asked to be forwarded to Lyell (Wyhe 2012). Writing to
  • called diphtheria. Then, on 23 June, Darwins infant son, Charles, ‘ commenced with Fever of some
  • his nurse had sickened. The following day, Darwin accepted Lyell and Hookers suggestion that they
  • now writing a great work. He showed it to Dr. Hooker and Sir Charles Lyell, who thought so highly of
  • and published in 1975 by R. C. Stauffer under the title Charles Darwins Natural Selection; …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … 9 November 1868] Darwin’s nephews, Edmund and Charles, write to Emma Darwin’s sister, …
  • … the Isle of White. Letter 4433  - Wright, Charles to Gray, A., [20, 25, 26 March …
  • … Letter 1836  - Berkeley, M. J. to Darwin, [7 March 1856] Clergyman and botanist …
  • … Letter 1836  - Berkeley, M. J. to Darwin, [7 March 1856] Clergyman and botanist Miles …

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … extract anything valuable from his letters to Darwin and Lyell for Athenæum . He mentioned Darwin …
  • … Letter 1979 — Darwin, C. R. to Lubbock, John, 27 Oct [1856] Darwin provides detailed …
  • … day with Henslow; much had to be done. His friend, Alexander Charles Wood, has written to Capt. …

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 6 hits

  • were not neglected either, as the correspondence with Charles Lyell, George Robert Waterhouse, John
  • his ideas on species mutability with Hooker, Horner, Jenyns, Lyell, Owen, and Charles James Fox
  • listed possible editors: at first he proposed any one of Lyell, Henslow, Edward Forbes, William
  • of elevation’, which formed the basis of discussions with Charles Lyell and Leonard Horner in
  • the geology of this vast area, reflecting the influence of Lyells  Principles of geology  (18303
  • Journal of researches  for a second edition in 1845. At Lyells recommendation, arrangements were

British Association meeting 1860

Summary

Several letters refer to events at the British Association for the Advancement of Science held in Oxford, 26 June – 3 July 1860. Darwin had planned to attend the meeting but in the end was unable to. The most famous incident of the meeting was the verbal…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … for a stomach that had “utterly broken down” (letter to Charles Lyell, 25 [June 1860] ). …
  • … Joseph Dalton Hooker (L. Huxley 1918, 1: 521–4); Charles Lyell (K. M. Lyell ed. 1881, 2: 335–6); …
  • … in the world. From his work on Physiology, published in 1856, he gave his views in support of the …

Darwin in letters, 1851-1855: Death of a daughter

Summary

The letters from these years reveal the main preoccupations of Darwin’s life with a new intensity. The period opens with a family tragedy in the death of Darwin’s oldest and favourite daughter, Anne, and it shows how, weary and mourning his dead child,…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … thought to proposing men of scientific eminence, such as Charles Lyell and Henri Milne-Edwards, for …
  • … the dispersal of animals and plants with Hooker who, with Charles Lyell and Edward Forbes, was one …