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Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 25 hits

  • On 14 May 1856, Charles Darwin recorded in his journal that heBegan by Lyells advice  writing
  • more for the sake of priority than anything elseDarwin was reluctant to squeeze his expansive
  • Natural selection . Determined as he was to publish, Darwin nevertheless still felt cautious
  • Charles Lyell and Joseph Dalton Hooker, who were joined in 1856 by Hookers friend the American
  • in London. Natural Selection Not all of Darwins manuscript on species has been
  • only source of information about his preoccupations during 1856 and 1857. They reveal little noticed
  • of pigeons, poultry, and other domesticated animals. As Darwin explained to Lyell, his studies, …
  • might work in nature ( letter from Charles Lyell, 12 May 1856, n. 10 ). He was surprised that no
  • remarked to Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 8 September [1856] ). I mean to make my
  • on domestic animals in India and elsewhere. William Darwin Fox supplied information about cats, dogs
  • mastiffs. The disparate facts were correlated and checked by Darwin, who adroitly used letters, …
  • can.’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 8 February [1857] ). Darwin also attempted to test ideas
  • on plants. Expanding projects set up during 1855 and 1856 (see  Correspondence  vol. 5), he tried
  • garden species with their wild congeners. Many of Darwins conclusions about the variation of
  • first two chapters of his species book, completed by October 1856 (‘Journal’; Appendix II). …
  • or lost during the process. Before the publication of Darwin's correspondence from these years, …
  • Gray, vary in the United States ( letter to Asa Gray, 2 May 1856 )? What about weeds? Did they
  • hermaphrodite’ ( letter to to T. H. Huxley, 1 July [1856] ), which became a source of amusement in
  • that Asa Gray and Hooker confirmed during the course of 1856. Science at home: the botanical
  • many different experiments on plants through the summers of 1856 and 1857, particularly with garden
  • …  not a bird be killed (by hawk, lightning, apoplexy, hail &c) with seeds in crop, & it would
  • have grown well.’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 10 December [1856] ). His faith in his ideas
  • trees (see letters to William Erasmus Darwin, [26 February 1856] and to Charles Lyell, 3 May
  • Waring Darwin, the sixth and last, was born on 6 December 1856) was a constant worry, particularly
  • and the preparation of his manuscript ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 1 May 1857 ) seem innocuous and

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 17 hits

  • Re: DesignAdaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and othersby Craig
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring
  • Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the dress of a modern day
  • Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as a sort
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwinmade his home on the border of the little
  • are kept in check by a constitutional weakness. DARWIN: A plain but comfortable brick
  • by every blessing except that of vigorous healthDARWIN4   My confounded stomach
  • pursuits and the simplicity of his character. DARWIN:   5   I am allowed to work now
  • own house, where he was the most charming of hosts. DARWIN:   6   My life goes on
  • paragraph, in which I quote and differ from you[r178   doctrine that each variation has been
  • ARTS AND SCIENCES, PROCEEDINGS XVII, 1882 4  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 10 MAY 1848
  • 21 JULY 1855 14  C DARWIN TO A GRAY, 14 JULY 1856 15  A GRAY TO C DARWIN
  • 1855 23  JD HOOKER TO C DARWIN, 9 NOVEMBER 1856 24  C DARWIN TO JD

Origin

Summary

Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of his wish to establish priority for the species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856…

Matches: 21 hits

  • Darwins most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew
  • species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, …
  • of the first public presentation of documents relating to Darwins species theory together with
  • Down for a few weeks to the Isle of Wight. Although Darwin and Wallaces papers were
  • … . In reply, Hooker provided reassurance by suggesting that Darwin might be able to have 100 to 150
  • the big book on large and small genera, and was able to tell Darwinyou overrate the extent of my
  • than I now do. ’  Even with this endorsement, Darwins spirits remained low. ‘ We are too
  • on 18 July. Just two days later, he told his cousin William Darwin FoxAfter all, I am now
  • because Fox had been instrumental in persuading Darwin not to publish an abstract in 1856 , …
  • … & I shall have separate copies & will send you one . Darwins weariness in
  • the Isle of Wight, and having started work on his abstract, Darwin was in an altogether more
  • continued in August, while he was still away from DownDarwin knew that these puzzles had to be
  • to hear your objections to my species speculations’, Darwin wrote to Henslow, ‘ The difficulties
  • full abstract of all my notions on this subject. ’ Darwin evidently continued to fret about the
  • published. ’ It was clear that the big book remained Darwins focus of attention for the full
  • skeletonising them and completing hisPigeon M.S.’ ( Darwin's Journal ) ‘At last, thank God, …
  • him to take any of the pure birds that were left. Although Darwin looked forward to the visit and
  • pamphlet. ’ On the 4 October, in a letter to T. C. Eyton explaining his change of plans regarding
  • views were apparent when he reported to Wallace thatD r . Hooker has become almost as
  • I have been thinking that if I am much execrated as atheist &c, whether the admission of
  • of all living beings,—on their lines of migration &c &c. ’   Reference: …

Dates of composition of Darwin's manuscript on species

Summary

Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwin’s manuscript on species (DAR 8--15.1, inclusive; transcribed and published as Natural selection). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by…

Matches: 9 hits

  • Many of the dates of letters in 1856 and 1857 were based on or confirmed by reference to Darwins
  • as Natural selection ). This manuscript, begun in May 1856, was nearly completed by June 1858. At
  • transmutation ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [June 1858] ). Darwin recorded in hisJournalthe
  • in theJournaland the chapter headings as supplied by Darwin, followed by the reference of the
  • also given. Chapter 1 is not extant nor was it recorded in Darwin'sJournal’. Chapter 2 is not
  • 2 13 October 1856 [Variation under domestication] [2] …
  • 11 13 October 1856 Geographical distribution (DAR 14; …
  • 3 16 December 1856 On the possibility of all organic
  • chapter has been taken from a table of contents to which Darwin added the names of chapters as he

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] …
  • … . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] Mary Barber
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] …
  • Letter 8144 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [5 January 1872] Darwin asks his niece, …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 9606 - Harrison, L. C. to Darwin, [22 August 1874] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • Letter 1836  - Berkeley, M. J. to Darwin, [7 March 1856] Clergyman and botanist
  • garden ”. Letter 6083  - Casparay, J. X. R. to Darwin, [2 April 1868] …
  • the future. Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [12-13 March 1863] Darwin
  • … . Several reviewers speak of thelucid, vigorous style, &c.” for which he owes her a great debt
  • Letter 7858 - Darwin to Wa llace, A. R., [12 July 1871] Darwin tells Wallace that
  • Letter 1836  - Berkeley, M. J. to Darwin, [7 March 1856] Clergyman and botanist Miles

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 27 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian
  • in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on Geog. distrib: of Brit: …
  • Wiegman has pub. German pamphlet on crossing oats &c [Wiegmann 1828] Horticultural
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • … [DAR *128: 160] Mansfields Paraguay [Mansfield 1856] } read Chesterton Prison Life
  • Hutchison Dog Breaking 3 d . Edit [Hutchinson 1856] new information on Pointer & Retriever
  • Annal des Sc. Nat. 4 th  Series. Bot. Vol 6 [Naudin 1856]. Read Notes to Jardine & …
  • 1855 Sept. Tegetmeier on Poultry [Tegetmeier 18567] —— 27 th . Mem. de lAcad. …
  • Das Ganze der Landwirttschaft [Kirchhof 1835].— 1856. Jan 10 th  G. Colin Traite de
  • … [Rudolphi 1812] [DAR 128: 16] 1856 Jan 21. Hucs Chinese Empire [Huc
  • Mar 1 Veith Naturgeschichte Haussaugethiere [Veith 1856].— 3 d  Knox Races of Man.— 1850 [R
  • 174155] d[itt]o [DAR 128: 17] 1856 . Jan 28. Watts Life by Muirhead
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21

Before Origin: the ‘big book’

Summary

Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the very day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles (Darwin's Journal). He had long considered the question of species. In 1842, he outlined a theory of transmutation in a…

Matches: 21 hits

  • Darwin begansorting notes for Species Theoryon 9 September 1854, the
  • day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles ( Darwin's Journal ). He had long
  • to paper in a more substantial essay. By this point, Darwin had also admitted to his close friend
  • he acknowledged, ‘ like confessing a murder ’. While Darwin recognised he had far more work to do
  • reaction to the transmutation theory it contained convinced Darwin that further evidence for the
  • of Vestiges to him. It took another ten years before Darwin felt ready to start collating his
  • six months before he started sorting his species notes, Darwin had worried that the process would
  • I shall feel, if I when I get my notes together on species &c &c, the whole thing explodes
  • immutability of species ’, he told his cousin William Darwin Fox. Experimental work
  • set up to provide crucial evidence for his arguments. Fox, Darwin assumed, would have bred pigeons
  • intensely bred to exaggerate particular characters, would, Darwin believed, clearly exhibit the
  • naturalist Edward Forbes. Darwin declared to Hooker in July 1856y ou continental extensionists
  • geograph. distribution, geological historyaffinities &c &c &c.. And it seems to me, …
  • of his old friend, the geologist Charles Lyell, who, in May 1856, twenty months after Darwin had
  • urgency to publish and, following Lyells advice in May 1856, began to write a sketch his theory. ‘I
  • without full details. ’ Writing to his cousin Fox in June 1856, Darwin openly confessed his fears
  • workhe haddesisted’. By November 1856, he had both good and bad news to report to Lyell: ‘ …
  • press. Although Darwin had decided in the autumn of 1856 to write only from the materials he
  • wrote ten and a half chapters of his Big Book between May 1856 and June 1858. With a total of
  • length ’, he had complained to Hooker in December 1856. By mid-1858, only the first chapter on
  • and a half chapters were edited and published in 1975 by R. C. Stauffer under the title Charles

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 13 hits

  • activities for building and maintaining such connections. Darwin's networks extended from his
  • when strong institutional structures were largely absent. Darwin had a small circle of scientific
  • section contains two sets of letters. The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. …
  • about Hookers thoughts. Letter 729Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., [11 Jan 1844] …
  • confessing a murder”. Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 23 Feb [1844] …
  • Darwin and Gray Letter 1674Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 25 Apr [1855] Darwin
  • species. Letter 1685Gray, Asa to Darwin, C. R., 22 May 1855 Gray recalled
  • flora in the USA. Letter 2125Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 20 July [1857] Darwin
  • information exchange. Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] …
  • name. Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 In this gossipy
  • species descriptions. Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849
  • Letter 1319Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 6 & 7 Apr 1850 Hooker apologises for the
  • Letter 1979Darwin, C. R. to Lubbock, John, 27 Oct [1856] Darwin provides detailed

Language: key letters

Summary

How and why language evolved bears on larger questions about the evolution of the human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the development of human speech from animal sounds in The Descent of Man (1871),…

Matches: 14 hits

  • human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the
  • he first began to reflect on the transmutation of species. Darwins correspondence reveals the scope
  • he exchanged information and ideas. Letter 346Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, C. S., 27 Feb 1837
  • one stock.” Letter 2070Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [before 29 Sept 1857] …
  • because we can trace the elements into Latin, German &c. but I see much the same sort of thing
  • down of former continents.” Letter 3054Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 2 Feb [1861] …
  • that languages, like species, were separately created. Darwin writes to the geologist Charles Lyell
  • I tell him is perfectly logical.” Letter 5605Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J. F. T., 15 Aug
  • Letter 7040Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [1868-70?] As Darwin began to work on
  • growing to such a stageLetter 8367Darwin, C. R. to Wright, Chauncey, 3 June [1872] …
  • altering the breed. Letter 8962Darwin, C. R. to Max Müller, Friedrich, 3 July 1873
  • Letter 10194Max Müller, Friedrich to Darwin, C. R., 13 Oct [1875] For Müller, human and
  • … […]” Letter 9887Dawkins, W. B. to Darwin, C. R., 14 Mar 1875 The relationship
  • … […]” Letter 11074Sayce, A. H. to Darwin, C. R., 27 July 1877 Darwins study of

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 28 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little
  • of   On the origin of   species , intended to be Darwins last, and of  Expression of the
  • … `big book’,  Natural selection , begun in 1856Coming hard on the heels of  The descent of man
  • books brought a strong if deceptive sense of a job now done: Darwin intended, he declared to Alfred
  • on 'so difficult a subject, as evolution’ ( letter to ARWallace,  27 July [1872] ). …
  • of books and papers, and the latter formed the subject of Darwins last bookThe formation of   …
  • worms , published in the year before his deathDespite Darwins declared intention to take up new
  • begun many years before. In his private life also, Darwin was in a nostalgic frame of mind, …
  • The last word on Origin The year opened with Darwin, helped by his eldest son William, …
  • on 30 January , shortly after correcting the proofs, and Darwins concern for the consolidation of
  • and sixth editions were costly to incorporate, and despite Darwins best efforts, set the final
  • remained unpublished at the end of the year ( letter from C.-FReinwald, 23 November 1872 ). …
  • to bring out the new edition in the United States, Darwin arranged with Murray to have it
  • had to be resetThe investment in stereotype reinforced Darwins intention to make no further
  • A worsening breach The criticisms against which Darwin had taken the greatest trouble to
  • objections to the theory of natural selection’, Darwin refuted point by point assertions published
  • Whale  & duck  most beautiful’ ( letter from ARWallace, 3 March 1872 ). I
  • Although Mivart was among those who wrote in January to wish Darwin a happy new year, before the
  • … `chiefly perhaps because I do it badly’ ( letter to ARWallace, 3 August [1872] ).  …
  • from his ignorance, he feels no doubts’ ( letter to FCDonders, 17 June 1872 ). Right up to the
  • Charlton Bastians recent book on the origin of life (HCBastian 1872; Wallace 1872d) left him
  • … & new views which are daily turning up’ ( letter to ARWallace, 28 August [1872] ).  …
  • Lord Sackville Cecil, to attend a séance ( letter from MCStanley, 4 June 1872 ). There was
  • you agreed to let them have it for love!!!’ ( letter from RFCooke, 1 August 1872 ). It
  • …  & have not taken care of ourselves’ ( letter from RFCooke, 20 November 1872 ). A
  • gift, although he doubted he would ever use it ( letter to CLDodgson, 10 December 1872 ). …
  • try `with straight blunt knitting needle’ ( letter to LCWedgwood, 5 January [1872] ) to
  • to which any scientific man can look’ ( letter to FCDonders, 29 April [1872] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 25 hits

  • 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwins life. From a quiet rural existence
  • Russel Wallace. This letter led to the first announcement of Darwins and Wallaces respective
  • the composition and publication, in November 1859, of Darwins major treatise  On the origin of
  • …  exceeded my wildest hopes By the end of 1859, Darwins work was being discussed in
  • Charles Lyell, 25 [November 1859] ). This transformation in Darwins personal world and the
  • The 'big book' The year 1858 opened with Darwin hard at work preparing hisbig
  • his ninth chapter, on hybridism, on 29 December 1857, Darwin began in January 1858 to prepare the
  • appropriate. The correspondence shows that at any one time Darwin was engaged in a number of
  • The chapter on instinct posed a number of problems for Darwin. ‘I find my chapter on Instinct very
  • … ). In addition to behaviour such as nest-building in birds, Darwin intended to discuss many other
  • celebrated as a classic example of divine design in nature. Darwin hypothesised that the instinct of
  • of construction as it took place in the hive. As with Darwins study of poultry and pigeons, …
  • founder and president of the Apiarian Society, provided Darwin with information and specimens. His
  • For assistance with mathematical measurements and geometry, Darwin called upon William Hallowes
  • from the  Beagle voyage; on his brother, Erasmus Alvey Darwin; and his son William. Even his
  • bees and bee-hives. Variation and reversion Darwin also continued the botanical work
  • of smaller genera? The inquiry was of great importance to Darwin, for such evidence would support
  • of the statistics was still problematic. Hooker thought that Darwin was wrong to assume that
  • were not certain. This was a question new to the experts. Darwin was delighted to hear from Asa Gray
  • completed and his results written up. With some trepidation, Darwin sent his manuscript off to
  • work—& that I confess made me a little lowbut I c d . have borne it, for I have the
  • in the letters of 1858 also relate to questions that Darwin had begun to explore earlier. Letters to
  • rush to publish With much of his research completed, Darwin began in mid-June 1858 to write
  • Wallace enunciated his own theory of natural selection. Darwins shock and dismay is evident in the
  • it is impossible that men like Lyell, Hooker, Huxley, H. C. Watson, Ramsay &c would change their

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 26 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters
  • am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • letter-writing dwindled considerably. The correspondence and Darwins scientific work diminished
  • of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • to mans place in nature  both had a direct bearing on Darwins species theory and on the problem
  • detailed anatomical similarities between humans and apes, Darwin was full of praise. He especially
  • in expressing any judgment on Species or origin of man’. Darwins concern about the popular
  • Lyells and Huxleys books. Three years earlier Darwin had predicted that Lyells forthcoming
  • first half of 1863 focused attention even more closely on Darwins arguments for species change. …
  • … ‘groan’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Darwin reiterated in a later letter that it
  • of creation, and the origin of species particularly, worried Darwin; he told Hooker that he had once
  • letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] ). Darwin did not relish telling Lyell of his
  • … ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 March [1863] ). Nevertheless, Darwins regret was profound that the
  • thebrutes’, but added that he would bring many towards Darwin who would have rebelled against
  • from Charles Lyell, 11 March 1863 ). The botanist Asa Gray, Darwins friend in the United States, …
  • off ( see letter from Asa Gray, 20 April 1863 ). In May, Darwin responded to Gray that Lyells and
  • or   Modification, ’. Faction fighting Darwin was not alone in feeling disaffected
  • in the subject. ‘The worst of it is’, Hooker wrote to Darwin, ‘I suppose it is virtually Huxleys
  • that he had contributed to the proofs of human antiquity. Darwin and Hooker repeatedly exchanged
  • appeared in the  Natural History Review  in January, Darwin, who was already ill-disposed towards
  • January [1863] ). Archaeopteryx Falconer, Darwin, and others found an additional
  • sentence from the second edition of  Antiquity of man  (C. Lyell 1863b, p. 469), published in
  • very slowly recovering, but am very weak’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [29 September? 1863] ). …
  • Thomass Hospital, London ( letter from George