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Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 25 hits

  • writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring Gray Louis Agassiz, Adam
  • this actor uses the words of Jane Loring Gray, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Hugh Falconer, Louis Agassiz, …
  • of his paper on Darwin.   THE SAND WALK: 1844 In which Darwin, at home in
  • of natural selection to his friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles
  • year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a part of
  • a murder. DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have beenengaged in a
  • the opportunity I enjoyed of making your acquaintance at Hookers three years ago; and besides that
  • sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind
  • 22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin and Gray by
  • species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how pleased I am
  • on your bowels of immutability. Darwin passes to Hooker a brace of letters 25
  • there is a little rap for you. GRAY:   26   Hooker [is] dreadfully paradoxical to
  • as well as any man. I send itDarwin passes to Hooker an envelope of seeds. …
  • and Hawks have often been seen in mid Atlantic. HOOKER:   28   Thanks for your letter
  • pleased to have. DARWIN33   My dear Hooker. Thanks, also, for [your] Photograph, …
  • expression and so by no means does you justice. HOOKER:   34   I believe I have very
  • beguiled into shouldrileyou, as you say it doesHooker rightly tells me, I have no business to
  • make a very audacious remark in opposition to what I imagine Hooker has been writing and to your own
  • to tell you, that before I had ever corresponded with you, Hooker had shown me several of your
  • … – a Scottish paleobotanist and contemporary of Darwin and HookerspluttersFALCONER: …
  • I can see that you have already corrupted and half-spoiled Hooker!! DARWIN: Now when I see
  • which is not written out much fuller in my sketch copied in 1844, and read by Hooker some dozen
  • world to come. DARWIN:   56   My dearest Hooker, You will, and so will Mrs Hooker, be
  • 1846 7  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 11 JANUARY 1844 8  C DARWIN TO A GRAY, 25
  • C DARWIN, 1819 AUGUST 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 19 hits

  • published two books on geologyVolcanic islands  (1844) and  Geological observations on South
  • edition in 1845, having already provided corrections in 1844 for a German translation of the first
  • Society of London, acting as one of four vice-presidents in 1844 and remaining on the council from
  • and refereed papers for all these organisations. Between 1844 and 1846 Darwin himself wrote ten
  • specimens by the young botanist and traveller, Joseph Dalton Hooker. More than 1200 letters between
  • and Richard Owen shows. These friends, with the addition of Hooker, were important to Darwin for
  • Darwin discussed his ideas on species mutability with Hooker, Horner, Jenyns, Lyell, Owen, and
  • others. Only two months after their first exchange, early in 1844, Darwin told Hooker that he was
  • … (it is like confessing a murder) immutable’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [11 January 1844] ). Nine
  • heterodox opinions and later in the year both Jenyns and Hooker were invited to read a manuscript
  • … , pp. 57255), an expanded version, completed on 5 July 1844, of a pencil sketch he had drawn up
  • In the event, it was not until the beginning of 1847 that Hooker was given a fair copy of the essay
  • the natural history of creation , published anonymously in 1844. His old friend Adam Sedgwick
  • attributed the book to him. But, as his letters to Hooker show, Darwin carefully considered and then
  • future, is that addressed to his wife Emma, dated 5 July 1844 , just after Darwin had completed
  • Forbes, and Owen were deleted, Henslows was queried, and J. D. Hookers was added. Much later, by
  • on species ( Natural selection ), he had decided that Hooker was by far the best man for the task
  • an argument against the French palaeontologist Alcide dOrbigny, insisting that the vast pampas
  • laws of creation, Geographical Distribution’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 February 1845] ) and

Joseph Dalton Hooker

Summary

The 1400 letters exchanged between Darwin and Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) account for around 10% of Darwin’s surviving correspondence and provide a structure within which all the other letters can be explored.  They are a connecting thread that spans…

Matches: 22 hits

  • with his closest friend, the botanist Joseph Dalton Hooker. The 1400 letters exchanged
  • that period. They illuminate the mutual friendships he and Hooker shared with other scientists, but
  • two menTheir correspondence began in 1843 when Hooker, just returned from James Clark Ross
  • main elements of his species theory, and within a few months Hooker was admitted into the small and
  • perhaps his most famous letter of all , Darwin wrote to Hooker in January 1844 of his growing
  • 1858 outlining an almost identical theory to his own, it was Hooker, together with Charles Lyell, …
  • Darwin callednatural selection”. It was also to Hooker that Darwin, writing furiously in
  • of  On the Origin of Species  for comment, and Hooker continued to be a sounding board for
  • which various plants are nourished, reproduce, and colonise. Hooker, who after ten years as
  • global networks of well-informed correspondents. Hooker was a frequent visitor to Darwin at
  • as well as to the patient ”. It was to Darwin that Hooker wrote just an hour after the death of his
  • the many hundreds of letters that passed between Darwin and Hooker all but a handful of those that
  • in 1888 and 1902, the second of which he dedicated to Hookerin remembrance of his lifelong
  • letters is also obvious, for example in his annotations to Hookers comments on the first edition of
  • Key letters Developing a theory: Darwin to J. D. Hooker, [11 January 1844] : Darwin
  • day, distracted by grief, Darwin sent two letters to Hooker who was in the midst of arranging
  • The writing of  Origin  and its reception: Hooker was one of the few to whom Darwin sent
  • …  for commentwith close to disastrous results when Hookers children used some of it for scrap
  • response of the old fogies of CambridgeRead  Hookers description of the famous 1860
  • … . Friendship, gossip, and shared jokes: Hooker started a running joke in their
  • being the result of natural selectionWhen Hooker had his family silver stolen by a man
  • had resulted in neuter humans who would not flirt. Hooker suggested they should give up

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 8 hits

  • tapping into the networks of others, such as Joseph Dalton Hooker and Asa Gray, who were at leading
  • of face-to-face contact. His correspondence with Joseph Hooker and Asa Gray illustrates how close
  • The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. Hooker. The second is between Darwin
  • to conclusion that species are not immutable. He admits to Hookerit is like confessing a murder”. …
  • Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] Darwin catches up on personal
  • name to specific name. Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 In
  • Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849 Darwin opens by discussing their
  • lamination of gneiss. Letter 1319Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 6 & 7 Apr 1850

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 25 hits

  • 4  [Pierquin de Gembloux 1839]. Said to be good by D r  L. Lindsay 5 [DAR *119: 1v. …
  • … [A. von Humboldt 1811] Richardsons Fauna Borealis [J. Richardson 182937] …
  • Brown 1814] & at the end of Congo voyage [R. Brown 1818]. (Hooker 923) 7  read
  • on Annals of Nat. Hist. [Jenyns 1838] Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. …
  • Teneriffe. in Pers. Narr. [A. von Humboldt 181429] D r  Royle on Himmalaya types [Royle
  • reference to authors about E. Indian Islands 8 consult D r  Horsfield [Horsfield 1824] …
  • sheep [Youatt 1831, 1834, 1837]. Verey Philosophie dHist. Nat. [Virey 1835] read
  • Paper on consciousness in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on
  • Crawford Eastern Archipelago [Crawfurd 1820] Raffeles d[itt]o [T. S. B. Raffles 1817] …
  • to White Nat. Hist of Selbourne [E. T. Bennett ed. 1837 and [J. Rennie] ed. 1833] read 19  : …
  • what have they written.? “Hunt” [J. Hunt 1806] p. 290
  • He is Horticulturist in France. Michaux, according to Hooker has written on topography of N. …
  • chiefly on distribution of forms said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith
  • Butler. 3. first sermons [Butler 1834] recommended by Sir. J. Mackintosh J. Long Moral Nature
  • 1841].— L d . Dudleys Correspondence [Dudley 1844]. Hallam Constitut Hist: Hen VII
  • Halls voyage in the Nemesis to China [Bernard 1844]. The Emigrant, Head [F. B. Head 1846] …
  • … ]. many very useful papers for me:— not in Hort. Soc. Hooker? Rogets Bridgewater Treatise
  • Observ. on Instinct [Etherington 18413]. Whittaker 1844. in Parts. cheap. 1.6 a part. 38
  • Jesses new Book. (April 44) on Nat. Hist [Jesse 1844] must be studied. J. JarvesScenes in
  • Traite Elementair  Palæontologie M. Pictet [Pictet 18445]— Forbes?? Waterhouse has it1844read
  • … —— Mauritius & C. of Good Hope Hooker recommends order [Backhouse
  • Decandolles Veg: Organ: } recommended by  Hooker . [A. P. de
  • C. Watson 1845]— gives up permanent species (alluded to by Hooker) Foreign & British Med. …
  • 43 Lindleys Vegetable Kingdom [Lindley 1846]. Hooker says very good for my purpose
  • Phytologist [ Phytologistmust be read . Hooker. read Fortunes Travels in China

Capturing Darwin’s voice: audio of selected letters

Summary

On a sunny Wednesday in June 2011 in a makeshift recording studio somewhere in Cambridge, we were very pleased to welcome Terry Molloy back to the Darwin Correspondence Project for a special recording session. Terry, known for his portrayal of Davros in Dr…

Matches: 0 hits

Natural Selection: the trouble with terminology Part I

Summary

Darwin encountered problems with the term ‘natural selection’ even before Origin appeared.  Everyone from the Harvard botanist Asa Gray to his own publisher came up with objections. Broadly these divided into concerns either that its meaning simply wasn’t…

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  • … enclosure to Gray , along with extracts from Darwin’s 1844 species essay , that was read to the …

Darwin in letters, 1851-1855: Death of a daughter

Summary

The letters from these years reveal the main preoccupations of Darwin’s life with a new intensity. The period opens with a family tragedy in the death of Darwin’s oldest and favourite daughter, Anne, and it shows how, weary and mourning his dead child,…

Matches: 8 hits

  • in zoological matters, just as he did on Joseph Dalton Hookers in botany. Moreover, this circle of
  • in his health was indicated by his comment in a letter to Hooker on 29 [May 1854] : ‘Very far
  • order to supplement views already expressed in his essay of 1844 ( Foundations ; Correspondence
  • also drawing the botanist Miles Joseph Berkeley, his friend Hooker, and various readers of the
  • such speculative, large-scale geological changes. As he told Hooker in a letter of 5 June [1855] …
  • arguments for the dispersal of animals and plants with Hooker who, with Charles Lyell and Edward
  • out his species essay in full. In 1850, he had written to Hooker ( Correspondence  vol. 4, …
  • is perverse & will not do as I wish it’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 7 May [1855] ). But, whether

Darwin in letters, 1847-1850: Microscopes and barnacles

Summary

Darwin's study of barnacles, begun in 1844, took him eight years to complete. The correspondence reveals how his interest in a species found during the Beagle voyage developed into an investigation of the comparative anatomy of other cirripedes and…

Matches: 15 hits

  • Darwin wrote to his friend and confidant Joseph Dalton Hooker: ‘I hope this next summer to finish my
  • my species-work’ ( Correspondence  vol. 3, letter to J. D. Hooker, [5 or 12 November 1845] ). …
  • Of special interest are the nine letters from Joseph Dalton Hooker written during his expedition in
  • and frequently dangerous travels through the mountains. Hooker writes of the complicated geology of
  • of the Sikkim Himalaya. In the midst of all this activity, Hooker responds to Darwins particular
  • other. Geology, and geological controversy Hookers letters illuminate the role of the
  • Herschel, to write the chapter on geology ( letter to J. F. W. Herschel, 4 February [1848] ). …
  • intended that invertebrates be included in Zoology, but by 1844 it had become clear that the
  • that such a monograph was adesideratum’ ( letter to J. L. R. Agassiz, 22 October 1848 ), was
  • are clearly expressed in his letters; he also pointed out to Hooker that it was his species theory
  • of the sexes from an ancestral hermaphrodite in his Notebook D ( Notebooks ) and had subsequently
  • or pistils ( Correspondence  vol. 2, letter from J. S. Henslow, 21 November 1840 ). The sexual
  • this importance comes through in his happy protestations to Hooker: ‘But I can hardly explain what I
  • you say, my species theory is all gospel.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 10 May 1848 ). Once
  • to H. E. Strickland, 29 January [1849] . As Darwin wrote to J. D. Hooker, who had warned him

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 16 hits

  • of Darwins findings had been spread by the publication by J. S. Henslow and Adam Sedgwick of
  • results of the  Beagle  voyage. With the help of J. S. Henslow, William Whewell, and other
  • during the autumn of 1843, and  Planariae, described in 1844. Another important specimen was the
  • by Adam White; infusoria by C. G. Ehrenberg; fungi by M. J. Berkeley; and corals by William Lonsdale
  • were neglected. During the voyage Darwin had expected that J. S. Henslow would describe his
  • the end of 1843, he increasingly hoped that William Jackson Hooker or his son Joseph might be
  • were discovered that contain lists of Darwins plants (see D. M. Porter 1981). Charles Lyell
  • … . . . on the origin & variation of species” ( Letter to J. S. Henslow, [November 1839] ).   …
  • filled, with facts It is true that, until he took J. D. Hooker into his confidence in
  • to convince anyone that he had a sound solution to what J. F. W. Herschel in a letter to Lyell had
  • clearly  under sub-laws.' To his cousin, W. D. Fox, [25 January 1841] , he wrote: & …
  • this field and on friends like Henslow, T. C. Eyton, and W. D. Fox, who were knowledgeable about
  • distributed ( Correspondence vol. 2, Appendix V). As P. J. Vorzimmer has pointed out (Vorzimmer
  • … [20 February 1840] , ‘as usual has been my enemybut D r . Holland tells me he thinks it is only
  • for Kemp, based on Kemps letters, and published in 1844 almost entirely as Darwin wrote it (see
  • so-calledscience of morphology’, first set forth by J. W. von Goethe. Though widely accepted in

Darwin’s study of the Cirripedia

Summary

Darwin’s work on barnacles, conducted between 1846 and 1854, has long posed problems for historians. Coming between his transmutation notebooks and the Origin of species, it has frequently been interpreted as a digression from Darwin’s species work. Yet…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … influential essay on classification (Milne-Edwards 1844). Like von Baer, Milne-Edwards recognised …
  • … paper on classification by Gaspard Auguste Brullé (Brullé 1844). In this work, Brullé argued that …
  • … of embryological development, as outlined in his essay of 1844 ( Foundations , pp. 57–255), …
  • … to hermaphrodite cirripedes, for example,  Darwin informed Hooker of this interesting discovery and …
  • … Toward the end of his study of Balanus , in a letter to Hooker on 25 September [1853] ( …
  • … of his theory of evolution can be recognised. Indeed, both Hooker and Huxley believed that the …
  • … p. 45). See also the fuller discussion of this topic in the 1844 essay ( Foundations , p. 229).   …
  • … and body of a mammal.   ^5^ In his species essay of 1844, for example, CD stated: ‘The cause …
  • … CD had arrived at such a view of cirripede systematics by 1844, judging by statements in the essay …

Hunt for new letters: last chance!

Summary

Think you know of a letter to or from Darwin that we haven’t found? Let us know! Although we already know of more than 15,000 letters that Darwin exchanged with nearly 2000 correspondents around the world, letters continue to come to light in both…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Think you know of a letter to or from Darwin that we haven’t found? Let us know! Although …

Controversy

Summary

The best-known controversies over Darwinian theory took place in public or in printed reviews. Many of these were highly polemical, presenting an over-simplified picture of the disputes. Letters, however, show that the responses to Darwin were extremely…

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  • … between Darwin and his close friends, Joseph Dalton Hooker and Charles Lyell, show that Darwin, who …
  • … in Wallace’s sketch also appears in his sketch of 1844. A year ago Darwin sent a short sketch of his …

New material added to the American edition of Origin

Summary

A ‘revised and augmented’ American edition of Origin came on the market in July 1860, and was the only authorised edition available in the US until 1873. It incorporated many of the changes Darwin made to the second English edition, but still contained…

Matches: 12 hits

  • way toward publishing the book. Indeed, by early in January D. Appleton & Co. had Origin in
  • Acting on Darwins behalf, Gray duly contacted D. Appleton to inquire about authors copyright and
  • … [17 January 1860], and 23 January 1860). Although D. Appleton was not obliged by United
  • changed his mind. On 31 January he told Joseph Dalton Hooker that he was preparing ahistorical
  • to Asa Gray, 1 February [1860]). By 1 May 1860, D. Appleton had sold the bulk of the 2250
  • the only one available in the United States until 1873, when D. Appleton prepared a new edition
  • side of change. The Vestiges of Creation appeared in 1844. In the last or tenth and much
  • prejudices. In 1846, the veteran geologist, M. J. dOmalius dHalloz, published in an
  • du monde, la forme, le volume et la durée de chacun deux, en raison de sa destinée dans lordre de
  • edition of this work was published. In December, 1859, Dr. Hooker published his Introduction to the
  • inordinate increase of specific forms throughout the world. Hooker has recently shown that in the S. …
  • having read the discussions on this subject by Lyell and by Hooker in regard to plants, concur only