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Darwin’s study of the Cirripedia

Summary

Darwin’s work on barnacles, conducted between 1846 and 1854, has long posed problems for historians. Coming between his transmutation notebooks and the Origin of species, it has frequently been interpreted as a digression from Darwin’s species work. Yet…

Matches: 25 hits

  • Darwins work on barnacles, conducted between 1846 and 1854, has long posed
  • … , it has frequently been interpreted as a digression from Darwins species work. Yet when this study
  • anomalous. Moreover, as the letters in this volume suggest, Darwins study of cirripedes, far from
  • classification using the most recent methods available, Darwin was able to provide a thorough
  • his views on the species question (Crisp 1983).    Darwins interest in invertebrate zoology
  • Robert Edmond Grant. In his Autobiography (pp. 4950), Darwin recalled: ‘Drs. Grant and
  • numerous references to the ova of various invertebrates, and Darwins first scientific paper, …
  • marine organisms was exercised during the Beagle voyage. Darwin expressed his current enthusiasm
  • earlier researches in Edinburgh on the ova of invertebrates, Darwin was particularly well prepared
  • In 1835, in the Chonos Archipelago off the coast of Chile, Darwin foundmost curiousminute
  • In the zoological notes made during the Beagle voyage, Darwin recorded: ‘The thick shell of some
  • the absence of a shell and its unusual parasitic nature, Darwin recognised that it differed greatly
  • Such a revaluation had not been undertaken when, in 1846, Darwin began to examine several
  • of as many genera as I could procure.’ For fourteen months Darwin pursued an anatomical study of
  • British Museum and himself a cirripede expert, suggested to Darwin that he prepare a monograph of
  • and advised him on procuring other collections. At the time Darwin committed himself to this study, …
  • his attention for the next seven years. To appreciate why Darwin would have undertaken such a study, …
  • correspondence with George Robert Waterhouse. On [26 July 1843] ( Correspondence vol. 2), for
  • such questions as yours,—whether number of species &c &c should enter as an element in
  • from common stocksIn this view all relations of analogy &c &c &, consist of those
  • metamorphoses, as we shall see presently in Hippoboscus &c  states that in Crust, antennæ & …
  • 1852) or elevating it to a separate class altogether (R. Owen 1855). Milne-Edwards and Owen also
  • as a distinct class between the Crustacea and the Annelida (R. Owen 1855).^7^ Darwin, however, with
  • spirits  Every cirriped that I dissect I preserve the jaws &c. &c. in this manner, which
  • CDs specimen has remained unique. (The editors thank Drs R. W. Ingle and G. Boxshall of the British

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 28 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian
  • in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on Geog. distrib: of Brit: …
  • Wiegman has pub. German pamphlet on crossing oats &c [Wiegmann 1828] Horticultural
  • … [DAR *119: 13v.] Yarrels Birds [Yarrell 1843] (1 Vol read) Last Edit of Malthus
  • 182536] Prescott. Hist. of Mexico [W. H. Prescott 1843], strongly recommended by Lyell (read
  • Travels into the interior of New Zealand [Dieffenbach 1843]. Capt. Porter, Journ of Cruize in
  • Prichards. Nat: History of Man. Bailliere. 1.10 [Prichard 1843must be studied . London Library
  • Essay on serpent (1844). 6 s . 6 d . Edinburgh [Schlegel 1843]. Geograph. Distrib &c &c. …
  • … “Scenes in Sandwich Isl d  & Central America [Jarves 1843] contains good account of Silkworm, …
  • … } Much Botany & [Backhouse 1843] Nat: Hist.— …
  • …  be read. Paper on transmutation of shells [Haldeman 18434] already (1844) VI. vols. …
  • … . 42  [P. Miller 1724] Life of Wilkie [Cunningham 1843] & Chantry [G. Jones 1849]. …
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …
  • Peacock, George. 1855Life of Thomas Young, M.D., F.R.S.  London.  *128: 172; 128: 21

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 26 hits

  • The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle  voyage was one
  • of the living species he had collected. By the end of 1843 he had also completed the writing of a
  • a family Busy as he was with scientific activities, Darwin found time to re-establish family
  • close contact. In November 1838, two years after his return, Darwin became engaged to his cousin, …
  • daughter, Anne Elizabeth, moved to Down House in Kent, where Darwin was to spend the rest of his
  • his greatest theoretical achievement, the most important of Darwins activities during the years
  • identifications of his bird and fossil mammal specimens, Darwin arrived at the daring and momentous
  • ideas on a wide range of topics. Then, in September 1838, T. R. Malthus’  An essay on the principle
  • in species. With this new theoretical point of departure Darwin continued to make notes and explore
  • present in the version of 1859. Young author Darwins investigation of the species
  • the  Beagle  had returned to England, news of some of Darwins findings had been spread by the
  • the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle  from February 1838 to October 1843. The correspondence provides a
  • Fossil Mammalia , by Richard OwenMammalia , by G. R. WaterhouseBirds , by John Gould;  …
  • in articles on  Sagitta , finished during the autumn of 1843, and  Planariae, described in 1844
  • publications. The beetles were described by F. W. Hope, G. R. Waterhouse, and C. C. Babington; the
  • unless they went to some other authority. Towards the end of 1843, he increasingly hoped that
  • all crosses between all domestic birds & animals dogs, cats &c &c very valuable—' …
  • on literature in this field and on friends like Henslow, T. C. Eyton, and W. D. Fox, who were
  • the practice of systematists. As the correspondence with G. R. Waterhouse during the 1840s shows, …
  • thinking during this period and in his letters of 1843, Darwin was clearly testing his evolutionary
  • same, though I know what I am looking for' ( Letter to G. R. Waterhouse, [26 July 1843] ).  …
  • to how one ought to act’ ( Letter from Emma Darwin, [  c.  February 1839] ). These are not
  • … [20 February 1840] , ‘as usual has been my enemybut D r . Holland tells me he thinks it is only
  • twelve letters from Darwin to Kemp in the years 1840 to 1843 have come to light; they were published
  • flowersto the  GardenersChronicle , [late August 1843], expresses his interest inunity of
  • relation of fossil with recent. the fabric falls!' (Notebook C : 767). …

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 12 hits

  • activities for building and maintaining such connections. Darwin's networks extended from his
  • when strong institutional structures were largely absent. Darwin had a small circle of scientific
  • section contains two sets of letters. The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. …
  • about Hookers thoughts. Letter 729Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., [11 Jan 1844] …
  • confessing a murder”. Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 23 Feb [1844] …
  • Darwin and Gray Letter 1674Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 25 Apr [1855] Darwin
  • species. Letter 1685Gray, Asa to Darwin, C. R., 22 May 1855 Gray recalled
  • flora in the USA. Letter 2125Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 20 July [1857] Darwin
  • information exchange. Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] …
  • name. Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 In this gossipy
  • species descriptions. Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849
  • Letter 1319Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 6 & 7 Apr 1850 Hooker apologises for the

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] …
  • … . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] Mary Barber
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] …
  • Letter 8144 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [5 January 1872] Darwin asks his niece, …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 9606 - Harrison, L. C. to Darwin, [22 August 1874] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • garden ”. Letter 6083  - Casparay, J. X. R. to Darwin, [2 April 1868] …
  • the future. Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [12-13 March 1863] Darwin
  • … . Several reviewers speak of thelucid, vigorous style, &c.” for which he owes her a great debt
  • Letter 7858 - Darwin to Wa llace, A. R., [12 July 1871] Darwin tells Wallace that
  • as errors of fact. Letter 2501   - Lyell, C. to Darwin, [3 October 1859] …
  • Letter 717  - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [28 November 1843] Hooker thanks Darwin for his

People featured in the Dutch photograph album

Summary

Here is a list of people that appeared in the photograph album Darwin received for his birthday on 12 February 1877 from scientific admirers in the Netherlands. Many thanks to Hester Loeff for identifying and researching them. No. …

Matches: 5 hits

  • … list of people that appeared in the  photograph album Darwin received for his birthday on 12 …
  • … University   Utrecht 14 november 1843 Leipzig 20 may 1909 …
  • … School   Dordrecht 22 january 1843 Franeker 28 december 1896 …
  • … Publisher   Amsterdam 18 oktober 1843 Dordrecht  30 march …
  • …     Amsterdam 3 october 1843 Amsterdam 29 march 1913 …

Suggested reading

Summary

  Contemporary writing Anon., The English matron: A practical manual for young wives, (London, 1846). Anon., The English gentlewoman: A practical manual for young ladies on their entrance to society, (Third edition, London, 1846). Becker, L. E.…

Matches: 7 hits

  • Huxley, T. H.,  Lectures to working men - Lecture 1: On Darwin's work, 'Origin of
  • domestic influence and social obligations ,  (London, 1843). Somerville, M.,  On
  • scientific thinking  (London, 2006). Browne, JDarwins Origin of species : A b
  • … , pp. 84117Davidoff, L. & Hall, C.,  Family fortunes: Men and women of the
  • 1820 - 1885 , (Georgia, 2007). Harvey, J., ‘‘Darwins angels’: The women correspondents of
  • Review  19:2 (2009), pp. 197 - 210. Hubbard, R.,  The politics of womens biology , …
  • nature for new audiences  (Chicago, 2007). Numbers, R. L. & Stenhouse, J., (eds.),  …

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 26 hits

  • results of the  Beagle  voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but throughout these
  • species and varieties. In contrast to the received image of Darwin as a recluse in Down, the letters
  • Down House was altered and extended to accommodate Darwins growing family and the many relatives
  • The geological publications In these years, Darwin published two books on geologyVolcanic
  • papers for all these organisations. Between 1844 and 1846 Darwin himself wrote ten papers, six of
  • …  vol. 2, letter to A. Y. Spearman, 9 October 1843, n. 1). Darwin's inner circle: first
  • not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable Darwins earlier scientific friendships
  • friends, with the addition of Hooker, were important to Darwin foramong other thingsthey were the
  • scientific issues that arose out of his work on species. Darwin discussed his ideas on species
  • Only two months after their first exchange, early in 1844, Darwin told Hooker that he was engaged in
  • correspondence that his close friends were not outraged by Darwins heterodox opinions and later in
  • But although eager for the views of informed colleagues, Darwin was naturally protective of his
  • …  vol. 4, letter to J. D. Hooker, 8 [February 1847]). Darwin can be seen as a cautious strategist, …
  • candidate, known to be working on species and varieties, was Darwin himself: as he told his cousin
  • the book to him. But, as his letters to Hooker show, Darwin carefully considered and then rejected
  • Perhaps the most interesting letter relating to Darwins species theory, which also bears on his
  • to his wife Emma, dated 5 July 1844 , just after Darwin had completed the final draft of his
  • who would undertake to see the work through the press. Darwin also listed possible editors: at first
  • on the work. But the list was subsequently altered after Darwins second, and possibly third, …
  • Hookers was added. Much later, by the autumn of 1854 when Darwin began sorting out his notes in
  • the cover to that effect. The full consideration that Darwin gave to the future editing and
  • he was for much of the time too ill even to write letters, Darwin felt that his life was only too
  • in his health. Volcanoes, rocks, and fossils Darwins published work during this
  • elevation of extensive tracts of land relative to the sea. Darwin put forward a new explanation of
  • whose subsequent work led to the general acceptance of Darwins viewsSouth America  drew
  • with drawings of his first dissection. The barnacle—‘M r  Arthrobalanusin Hookers and Darwins

People featured in the Dutch photograph album

Summary

List of people appearing in the photograph album Darwin received from scientific admirers in the Netherlands for his birthday on 12 February 1877. We are grateful to Hester Loeff for providing this list and for permission to make her research available.…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … List of people appearing in the  photograph album Darwin received from scientific admirers in …
  • … Died just a few months after the album was sent to Charles Darwin at the age of 53 …
  • … University   Utrecht 14 November 1843 Leipzig 20 May 1909 …
  • … School   Dordrecht 22 January 1843 Franeker 28 December 1896 …
  • … Geologist, Economist an Darwinist. Corresponded with Darwin and translated The descent of Man in …
  • … Publisher   Amsterdam 18 October 1843 Dordrecht  30 March …
  • …     Amsterdam 3 October 1843 Amsterdam 29 March 1913 …

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 27 hits

  • Charles Darwins observations on the development of his children,[1began the
  • is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the
  • lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on
  • the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwins notes reveals, he closely
  • William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are
  • The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwins character clearly perceived by Emma during
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6For in these notes, Darwins deep scientific curiosity transcends his
  • that on occasion he refers to William asit’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate
  • memories.[8Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwins scientific goal, the notes here
  • the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had increased by five: …
  • the onset of frowning, smiling, etc., as was the focus of Darwins attention on William and Anne, …
  • of logical thought and language. On 20 May 1854, Darwin again took over the notebook and, …
  • all the notes until July 1856, when the observations ceased. Darwins later entries, like Emmas, …
  • Transcription: 1 [9W. Erasmus. Darwin born. Dec. 27 th . 1839.—[10During first week. …
  • of muscles, without a corresponding sensation. D r . Holland[12informs me children do not
  • in exact manner of grown up person.— March 1 st . 1843. Annie shows no signs of skill in
  • trowsers. Emma one morning put on an unconspicuous bonnet of C. Langton,[52W. instantly observed
  • was natural acting & deceit. 39v. [54Jan. 20 1843 Willy 3 years & a month. …
  • to something he used to say when a baby. 40  Feb 1843. Willy saysNoin the fiercest way
  • she added an s to the end of every wordEttis & Bettis &c afterwards all the ws were turned
  • goed dawn to the willage”. Fish for Smith. Kaw for cow. &c. Lenny[612 years old speaks
  • any thing with my egg. Miss Th. Shall I cut up y r  meat? L. I dont care whether you do or
  • … “But I could not help it”— I saidLenny you c d  help it, dont say that”. “I could not help it a
  • written in pencil by CD and subsequently overwritten by Emma Darwin. The transcription throughout
  • … [15] ‘Annie . . . fortnightwas written by Emma Darwin on the verso of page 3 and opposite the
  • later; Anne Elizabeth was born in 1841 and Henrietta Emma in 1843. Mrs Locke was probably the
  • The name and address of a Mrs Locke are noted in Emma Darwins 1843 diary. [16The following

Bibliography of Darwin’s geological publications

Summary

This list includes papers read by Darwin to the Geological Society of London, his books on the geology of the Beagle voyage, and other publications on geological topics.  Author-date citations refer to entries in the Darwin Correspondence Project’s…

Matches: 12 hits

  • This list includes papers read by Darwin to the Geological Society of London, his books on the
  • topicsAuthor-date citations refer to entries in the Darwin Correspondence Projects cumulative
  • given to reprints available in John van Wyhe ed.,  Charles Darwins shorter publications, 1829-1883
  • numbers refer to R. B. Freemans standard bibliography of Darwins works. —Extracts from
  • of His Majestys Ship Beagle, commanded by Capt. FitzRoy, R.NProceedings of the Geological
  • FitzRoy RN, during the years 1832 to 1836 . By Charles Darwin. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1842. …
  • … —Remarks on the preceding paper, in a letter from Charles Darwin, Esq., to Mr. Maclaren. Edinburgh
  • FitzRoy RN, during the years 1832 to 1836.  By Charles Darwin. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1844. …
  • FitzRoy RN, during the years 1832 to 1836By Charles Darwin. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1846. …
  • The structure and distribution of coral reefs . By Charles Darwin. Revised edition. London: Smith, …
  • History of Science  24: 13357. Stoddart, David R. 1976. Darwin, Lyell, and the geological
  • On the history of geology: Greene, Mott C. 1982Geology in the nineteenth century . …

Suggested reading

Summary

There is an extensive secondary literature on Darwin's life and work. Here are some suggested titles that focus Darwin’s correspondence, as well as scientific correspondence and letter-writing more generally. Collections of Darwin’s letters …

Matches: 8 hits

  • There is an extensive secondary literature on Darwin's life and work. Here are some suggested
  • al ., eds. 2008. Evolution: selected letters of Charles Darwin 18601870 . Cambridge: Cambridge
  • on scientific correspondence and letter-writing On Darwins correspondence: …
  • New Perspectives in British Cultural History , edited by R. Crone. Cambridge Scholars Press. …
  • Reception and Appropriation, in The reception of Charles Darwin in Europe , edited by Thomas
  • Studies 23 : 30117. Spary, E. C. 2000. Utopias garden: French natural history from
  • Philadelphia: John Benjamins. Pp. 1529. Chartier, R. 1997. An ordinary kind of writing: model
  • Edinburgh Review 183 : 30635. Roberts, W. 1843. History of letter-writing from the

Introduction to the Satire of FitzRoy's Narrative of the Voyages of the Adventure and Beagle

Summary

'a humble toadyish follower…': Not all pictures of Darwin during the Beagle voyage are flattering.  Published here for the first time is a complete transcript of a satirical account of the Beagle’s brief visit in 1836 to the Cocos Keeling islands…

Matches: 24 hits

  • obtain such a one I was (in a manner) compelled to take Mr Darwin on a far too independent footing. …
  • fond of Natural History”… Not all pictures of Darwin during the Beagle voyage are
  • in 1836 to the Cocos Keeling islands, the only coral atoll Darwin observed first-hand.  The satire, …
  • didnt meet them personally, Ross took bitter exception to Darwin and FitzRoys later accounts of
  • Anderson John Clunies Rosssatire, written c.1848, is a fascinating document. It is
  • captain, Robert FitzRoy and his naturalist companion Charles Darwin. Rossunique perspective on the
  • foreman on the one hand and the texts written by FitzRoy and Darwin on the other. We can certainly
  • but by no means least, the coral reef theories of Charles Darwin. (For that particular concern see
  • interest. Rosspicture of both FitzRoy and Darwin on this voyage is unlike any others we
  • influenced Rossown enterprises. His attitude to Darwin was somewhat less resentful, but still
  • at home. Finally, according to Ross, neither man wrote well: Darwin was trite and conventional , …
  • in FitzRoys voice, but some footnotes are signedJ.C.R.” and there are editorial interventions in
  • and are marked in roman numerals. Others relate to Darwins 1839 or 1845 volumes and Belchers
  • He went to sea first in a Greenland whaler aged thirteen, c.1800. In 1812, aged 25, while on a
  • until the late twentieth century. Alexander Hare (c.1770-1834) was a British merchant who
  • also refers to the second stage of FitzRoys career. In 1843, FitzRoy became the second governor of
  • as John Murrays publication of the new edition of Darwins Beagle journal was achieving success
  • to depression and died by suicide in 1865. Charles Darwin (1809-1882) A young naturalist, …
  • prone to rash speculations. Ross was conscious that Darwin was a rising star in the scientific world
  • Voyage of HMS Beagle Around the World . At Cocos Keeling, Darwin was keenly interested in the
  • of the Samarang voyage. Capt. Belcher was knighted in 1843, and in the ms. “FitzRoyusually
  • to his death. Capt. Alexander Albert Sandilands, R.N. (c.1786-1832) of HMS Comet
  • Gleanings in Science . Capt Francis Harding, R.N. (1799 - 1875) In HMS Pelorus , …
  • to Bencoolen in his ship Harriet . Joseph C. Raymond, a seaman from a British ship

Satire of FitzRoy's Narrative of the Voyages of the Adventure and Beagle, by John Clunies Ross. Transcription by Katharine Anderson

Summary

[f.146r Title page] Voyages of the Adventure and Beagle Supplement / to the 2nd 3rd and Appendix Volumes of the First / Edition Written / for and in the name of the Author of those / Volumes By J.C. Ross. / Sometime Master of a…

Matches: 29 hits

  • N o II of the foresaid works. By Captain Robert Fitzroy R.N. In the first Edition Mr
  • he is ready to admitthat althomany Captains R.N. do not hesitate to (unofficially) give the
  • obtain such a one I was (in a manner) compelled to take Mr Darwin on a far too independent footing. …
  • of this Supplement exhibit evidence to that effectin