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Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 25 hits

  • The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his
  • book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwins time for the rest of the year was devoted
  • way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from
  • offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be
  • a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate centred on Darwins evolutionary account of the
  • taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases
  • the page-proofs of  Descent , he wrote to Philip Lutley Sclater on 4 January , ‘Heaven knows, …
  • do to talk about it, which no doubt promotes the sale’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 26 March 1871 ) …
  • to her liking, ‘to keep in memory of the book’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 20 March 1871 ). …
  • and had forsaken his lunch and dinner in order to read it ( letter from James Crichton-Browne, 19
  • they believe to be the truth, whether pleasant or not’ (letter from W. W. Reade, 21 February 1871). …
  • and OldhamThey club together to buy them’ ( letter from W. B. Dawkins, 23 February 1871 ). …
  • ones n th . ancestor lived between tide-marks!’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 20 February 1871 ). …
  • and the heavy use of their arms and legs ( letter from C. L. Bernays, 25 February 1871 ). Samples
  • is a thing which I sh d  feel very proud of, if anyone c d . say of me.’ After the publication
  • of all times and all circumstances’ (8 April 1871, p. 5). Darwin condemned the author of the review
  • was achieved throughthe medium of opinion, positive law &c’, and transmitted by culture, not
  • in the world except. laughing. crying grinning pouting &c. &c’, he wrote to Hooker on 21
  • the mind on the circulation of the blood. The physiologist Michael Foster offered a lengthy
  • that could then produce physiological changes ( letter from Michael Foster, 4 June [1871] ). …
  • so giddy I can hardly sit up, so no more’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 4 August [1871] ). On 23
  • in natural history. He obtained a bottle of curare from Michael Foster in June. Curare was a
  • work on organisms without a nervous system ( letter from Michael Foster, [26 June 1871] ). …
  • raise annually on an acre of land at 16 tons (letter from L. C. Wedgwood, [20 November 1871] ). …
  • … ( letter to Asa Gray, 16 July [1871] , letter to S. R. S. Norton, 23 November [1871] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 23 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • be done by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August
  • pleasures of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such
  • Andone looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). …
  • was an illusory hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] …
  • inferred that he was well from his silence on the matter ( letter from Ernst Haeckel, 26 October
  • that the land had long remained stationary ( Coral reefs , p. vi). On receiving a presentation
  • retract his criticism in his own second edition (Dana 1875, p. 274). Descent
  • number of new facts and remarks’ ( Descent  2d ed., p. v). Among the many contributors was
  • practices might influence sex ratios ( Descent  2d ed., p. 258 n. 99). The former bishop of
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • and as displayingamazing ignorance’ ([Mivart] 1874b, p. 45). He also circuitously implicated
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • with extracts from a dogs stomach ( letter from T. L. Brunton, 28 February 1874 ), and Edward
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • details of an Australian variety of sundew ( letter from T. C. Copland, 23 June 1874 ). …
  • the face, with a physiological explanation ( letter from T. L. Brunton, [29] October [1874] ). …
  • Dohrn, 16 April and 9 August 1874 ). Darwin also helped Michael Foster to prepare a printed appeal
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He
  • to work in the physiological laboratory established by Michael Foster. He then studied under John