skip to content

Darwin Correspondence Project

Search: contains ""

400 Bad Request

Bad Request

Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand.


Apache/2.4.7 (Ubuntu) Server at cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk Port 443
Search:
in keywords
40 Items
Page:  1 2  Next

Leonard Jenyns

Summary

When Darwin returned from the Beagle voyage there was no-one available to describe the fish that he had collected. At Darwin’s request Jenyns, a friend from Cambridge days, took on the challenge. It was not an easy one: at that time Jenyns had only worked…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … first of John Stevens Henslow, and then of Leonard Jenyns, the vicar of Swaffham Bulbeck and Henslow …
  • … and the appointment confirmed’. Jenyns had known Darwin since he was an undergraduate at …
  • … drew them together. Jenyns noted that in those early days Darwin was ‘a most zealous Entomologist, …
  • … home. Indeed a friendly rivalry developed such that Darwin’s delight in seeing his name in print for …
  • … neighbourhood’. Some of the beetles that were collected by Darwin when he was an undergraduate are …
  • … whole science of Biology as then conceived’. When Darwin returned from the voyage there was …
  • … Cambridge. He humorously commented that just the mention of Darwin’s name brought on a fishy smell. …
  • … which remain of lasting value for scientists. After Darwin’s return from the voyage of the …

Leonard Darwin born

Summary

The Darwins' eighth child and fourth son, Leonard, is born

Matches: 1 hits

  • … The Darwins' eighth child and fourth son, Leonard, is born …

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … Octavian (3) Blomefield, Leonard (42) …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …
  • … Darwin, Horace (30) Darwin, Leonard (37) …
  • … Horner, K. M. (5) Horner, Leonard (13) …
  • … Jenyns, G. L. (1) Jenyns, Leonard (42) …
  • … Ruck, M. A. (2) Rudd, Leonard (2) …

The Voyage of the Beagle

Summary

It was a letter from his friend and former teacher, John Stevens Henslow, that brought the 22-year-old Charles Darwin news of the offer of a place on board the Admiralty surveying vessel, HMS Beagle, on a voyage to chart the coast of South America. It took…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … Professor of Botany, that brought the 22-year-old Charles Darwin news of the offer of a place on …
  • … companion to  Robert FitzRoy , the  Beagle 's captain; Darwin was not the first choice for …
  • … the top of the list when first Henslow himself, and then  Leonard Jenyns , was forced to turn it …
  • … around the world stretched to five.   During this time Darwin exchanged letters not only with his …

Photograph album of German and Austrian scientists

Summary

The album was sent to Darwin to mark his birthday on 12 February 1877 by the civil servant Emil Rade, and contained 165 portraits of German and Austrian scientists. The work was lavishly produced and bound in blue velvet with metal embossing. Its ornate…

Matches: 20 hits

  • … The album was sent to Darwin to mark his birthday on 12 February 1877 by the civil servant Emil …
  • … of zoology students at Jena. On receiving the album, Darwin wrote to Haeckel: The album …
  • … the right, and click on an entry to jump to the page. Darwin’s age was miscalculated by the …
  • … his 69th birthday, the start of his 70th year, but Darwin was only 68 in 1877. Despite this …
  • … On reading about the album in the journal Nature , one of Darwin's oldest friends Leonard
  • … first laid before the scientific world.— ( Letter from Leonard Blomefield, 12 March 1877 ) …
  • … in. The comparative anatomist exchanged over 90 letters with Darwin and was Darwin's most vocal …
  • … Haeckel was not satisfied with the final album. He wrote to Darwin on 9 February 1877 : ‘what …
  • … is not larger and the production is not more splendid’. Darwin replied: ' The album contains …
  • … physicians, and philosophers some were known personally to Darwin through correspondence. Ludwig …
  • … , Oskar Schmidt , and Fritz Schultze had all sent Darwin their works. Carl du Prel had …
  • … on his lectures on the theories of descent and selection. Darwin later praised the drawings in the …
  • … with his wife Carolina. Eduard Koch took over as Darwin's German publisher in 1867 and …
  • …  sent his observations on orchids and the oxslip for Darwin's work on Forms of flowers .  …
  • … Kosmos , a German journal of natural history founded in Darwin's and Haeckel's honour, …
  • … Caspari and Gustav Jäger . Krause wrote an essay on Darwin's grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, …
  • … More contributors to the album became correspondents of Darwin after it had been produced, including …
  • … Julius Wiesner .  Missing people Some of Darwin's German colleagues were missing …
  • … Victor Carus, who had translated most of Darwin's works into German, wrote that he had not sent …
  • … at Würzburg, Carl Gottfried Semper, who had disputed Darwin's theory of coral reefs, felt that …

Darwin’s Photographic Portraits

Summary

Darwin was a photography enthusiast. This is evident not only in his use of photography for the study of Expression and Emotions in Man and Animal, but can be witnessed in his many photographic portraits and in the extensive portrait correspondence that…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Darwin was a photography enthusiast. This is evident not only in his use of …
  • … portraits and in the extensive portrait correspondence that Darwin undertook throughout his lifetime …
  • … was jokingly lamenting his role as an intermediary for Darwin and his correspondents from around the …
  • … reinforced his experimental and scientific network. Darwin’s Portraits Darwin sat for …
  • … famous photographers to studio portraitists looking to sell Darwin’s image to the masses. Between …
  • … in nineteenth-century photography. Darwin’s first photo-chemical experience …
  • … This particular daguerreotype is unique in terms of Darwin’s collection of photographs – it is the …
  • … exchanged, but rather was an object of display placed on a Darwin family mantlepiece. The image …
  • … ten years before he sat for his next photograph. By 1853, Darwin’s life as a naturalist was well …
  • … in London and made at least four different exposures of Darwin between 1853 and 1857. They …
  • … Tommy. The man behind the camera was Darwin’s younger son, Leonard Darwin, who, six years later, …
  • … Image: Charles Darwin on his horse ‘Tommy’, 1868, Leonard Darwin, Dar 225:116, ©Cambridge University …
  • … and Fry return to make his  carte , he asked his son, Leonard, to produce a more private image. …
  • … was also made as a memento for both Darwin and for Leonard. Leonard was soon to depart on his long …
  • … a postman’s bag. Image: Charles Darwin, 1878, Leonard Darwin, Dar 225:119, ©Cambridge …
  • … but well-kept garden. It was on this new veranda that Leonard took another portrait of his father, …

Casting about: Darwin on worms

Summary

Earthworms featured in the news announcement in May 2014 that a citizen science project had been launched to map the distribution of earthworms across Britain (BBC Today programme, 26 May 2014). The general understanding of the role earthworms play in…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … for plants to flourish can be traced back to the last book Darwin wrote, snappily-titled The …
  • … on their habits, which was published in 1881. Despite Darwin’s fears that a book on earthworms might …
  • … out in his Natural History of Selborne of 1789 (a book Darwin claimed had ‘much influence on my …
  • … a new field in natural history, and almost a century later Darwin argued that all fields had passed …
  • … variety of strange things he persuaded people to do. Darwin concluded that worms had no sense …
  • … a metal whistle and to being shouted at, but also to Francis Darwin playing the bassoon, and to Emma …
  • … whether worms possessed the power to lift a pavement. Leonard and George made calculations about …
  • … existence of worms at that altitude. By the 1870s, Darwin was also drawing on the work of …
  • … him. Soon worm excrement was trusted to postal services, and Darwin acquired casts from India and …
  • … observations he had gathered to write a book on the subject. Darwin brought to the topic the …

Insectivorous plants

Summary

Darwin’s work on insectivorous plants began by accident. When he was on holiday in the summer of 1860, staying with his wife’s relatives in Hartfield, Sussex, he went for long walks in the heathland and became curious about the large number insects that…

Matches: 21 hits

  • Darwin’s work on insectivorous plants began by accident. When he was on …
  • … illness, probably typhoid fever. While caring for Etty, Darwin’s wife Emma wrote to a friend: …
  • …  In this song the lyrics are based on Darwin's statements about insectivorous plants in his …
  • … exchanging over twenty letters in the autumn of 1860 alone. Darwin started by asking Oliver to …
  • … as the Australian Drosera , and tried to reproduce Darwin’s results on the reaction of …
  • … certain nitrogenous compounds is marvellous. ’ Darwin turned his attention to the mechanism …
  • … viscid, dark red fluid. ’ By the end of November Darwin wrote to Charles Lyell: ‘ I will …
  • … of the Royal Society in February 1861 (Bonney 1919, p. 154), Darwin decided not to publish his …
  • … in Bournemouth in September 1862 for the sake of his son Leonard’s and wife’s recovery from …
  • … analogous in constitution & function to nervous matter. ’ Darwin wrote to the surveyor Edward …
  • … about Drosera & Dionæa ’. By August and September, Darwin was ordering essential oils and …
  • … New Jersey with these remarkable observations and Darwin asked her to observe the North …
  • … sundew) . As part of his medical training, Darwin’s son Francis studied histology at the …
  • … performing comparative experiments on animals. After Darwin had sent Burdon Sanderson an abstract of …
  • … Brown Institution’s staff, Thomas Lauder Brunton, assisted Darwin with the digestibility of chondrin …
  • … of Chemistry Edward Frankland supplied pure chemicals for Darwin’s study of digestion and …
  • … substance . After many careful experiments, in May 1874 Darwin proudly reported to his cousin …
  • … (the genus of tropical pitcher-plants) in parallel with Darwin’s study of Drosera and Dionaea …
  • … as your finger nail in 48 hours to lovely jelly ’, while Darwin could only reply: ‘ Poor Drosera …
  • … almost beyond their digestive power— ‘ Most of Darwin’s experimental work was on Drosera …
  • … , of all the other insectivorous plants he worked on, Darwin spent the most time studying …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 6 hits

  • … as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified …
  • … being a part of [an unpublished] manuscript. Darwin settles down to write. His tone is …
  • … THE CONCURRENCE OF BOTANISTS: 1855 In which Darwin initiates a long-running correspondence …
  • … gossip about difficult colleagues (Agassiz). Gray realizes Darwin is not revealing all of his …
  • … Journal, as a nut for [Professor] Agassiz to crack. Darwin and Gray share a joke at the …
  • … In which Gray, while continuing to provide stamps for Leonard Darwin’s collection, fails to be …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwin’s son George dominated the second …
  • … and traveller Alexander von Humboldt’s 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt …
  • … ). The death of a Cambridge friend, Albert Way, caused Darwin’s cousin, William Darwin Fox, to …
  • … from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one …
  • … I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a week’s visit to …
  • … Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that …
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in …
  • … 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and sceptics Darwin excused himself for reasons of …
  • … by George Henry Lewes and Marian Evans (George Eliot), but Darwin excused himself, finding it too …
  • … the month, another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwin’s cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those …
  • … imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin agreed that it was ‘all imposture’ …
  • … stop word getting to America of the ‘strange news’ that Darwin had allowed ‘a spirit séance’ at his …
  • … the first three months of the year and, like many of Darwin’s enterprises in the 1870s, were family …
  • … 21, letter to Smith, Elder & Co., 17 December [1873] ). Darwin himself had some trouble in …
  • … and letter to Charles Lyell, [13 January 1874] ). Darwin blamed his illness for the …
  • … . In his preface ( Coral reefs  2d ed., pp. v–vii), Darwin reasserted the priority of his work. …
  • … for the absence of coral-reefs in certain locations. Darwin countered with the facts that low …
  • … whole coastline of a large island. Dana also thought that Darwin had seen fringing reefs as proof of …
  • … in sympathy: ‘If anybody tries that on with my boy Leonard the old wolf will shew all the fangs he …
  • … [1874] ). At the end of June, Darwin’s fourth son, Leonard, who had joined the Royal …
  • … son of the Astronomer Royal, George Biddell Airy, to help Leonard gain the commission ( …
  • … took twelve weeks aboard the immigrant ship  Merope . Leonard joined a colourful collection of …
  • … son Francis married Amy Ruck, the sister of a friend of Leonard Darwin’s in the Royal Engineers, on …

Dining at Down House

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Dining, Digestion, and Darwin's Domestic Life While Darwin is best remembered for his scientific accomplishments, he greatly valued and was strongly influenced by his domestic life. Darwin's…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … Questions | Experiment Dining, Digestion, and Darwin's Domestic Life …
  • … and they partook in his scientific endeavours. One of Darwin's defining characteristics …
  • … provides into the bright and engaging personalities of the Darwin children and of family life in the …
  • … Dining at Down House Letter 259 —Charles Darwin to Caroline Darwin, 13 October …
  • … South American cities, cultures, geography, flora and fauna) Darwin complains to his sister Caroline …
  • … agreeable” for her sake. Letter 3626 —Emma Darwin to T. G. Appleton, 28 June [1862] …
  • … cod liver oil and moderate work, among other things, for Darwin’s complaints. Emma Darwin …
  • … suffers a bout of “rocking & giddiness”. Emma Darwin to Henrietta Darwin, [5 September …
  • … and is “absolutely gloating over puddings”. Leonard Darwin to George Darwin, 8 February …

Emma Darwin

Summary

Emma Darwin, Charles Darwin's wife and first cousin, was born Emma Wedgwood, the eighth and youngest child of Josiah Wedgwood II and Bessy Allen. Her father was the eldest son of the famous pottery manufacturer, Josiah Wedgwood I. Her mother was one…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … Emma Darwin, Charles Darwin's wife and first cousin, was born Emma Wedgwood, the eighth and …
  • … father's eldest sister, Susannah, had married Robert Waring Darwin of Shrewsbury, and had six …
  • … (Mary, Henrietta Emma, George Howard, Elizabeth, Francis, Leonard, Horace, and Charles Waring). Two …
  • … home. A great deal of her correspondence survives in the Darwin Archive–CUL, along with her …

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 25 hits

  • … results of the  Beagle  voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but throughout these …
  • … species and varieties. In contrast to the received image of Darwin as a recluse in Down, the letters …
  • … Down House was altered and extended to accommodate Darwin’s growing family and the many relatives …
  • … The geological publications In these years, Darwin published two books on geology,  Volcanic …
  • … papers for all these organisations. Between 1844 and 1846 Darwin himself wrote ten papers, six of …
  • … 2, letter to A. Y. Spearman, 9 October 1843, n. 1). Darwin's inner circle: first …
  • … not (it is like confessing a murder) immutable Darwin’s earlier scientific friendships …
  • … Lyell, George Robert Waterhouse, John Stevens Henslow, Leonard Horner, Leonard Jenyns, Edward Forbes …
  • … scientific issues that arose out of his work on species. Darwin discussed his ideas on species …
  • … Only two months after their first exchange, early in 1844, Darwin told Hooker that he was engaged in …
  • … correspondence that his close friends were not outraged by Darwin’s heterodox opinions and later in …
  • … But although eager for the views of informed colleagues, Darwin was naturally protective of his …
  • …  vol. 4, letter to J. D. Hooker, 8 [February 1847]). Darwin can be seen as a cautious strategist, …
  • … candidate, known to be working on species and varieties, was Darwin himself: as he told his cousin …
  • … the book to him. But, as his letters to Hooker show, Darwin carefully considered and then rejected …
  • … Perhaps the most interesting letter relating to Darwin’s species theory, which also bears on his …
  • … to his wife Emma, dated 5 July 1844 , just after Darwin had completed the final draft of his …
  • … who would undertake to see the work through the press. Darwin also listed possible editors: at first …
  • … on the work. But the list was subsequently altered after Darwin’s second, and possibly third, …
  • … Hooker’s was added. Much later, by the autumn of 1854 when Darwin began sorting out his notes in …
  • … the cover to that effect. The full consideration that Darwin gave to the future editing and …
  • … he was for much of the time too ill even to write letters, Darwin felt that his life was only too …
  • … in his health. Volcanoes, rocks, and fossils Darwin’s published work during this …
  • … elevation of extensive tracts of land relative to the sea. Darwin put forward a new explanation of …
  • … which formed the basis of discussions with Charles Lyell and Leonard Horner in letters in this …

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 28 hits

  • … The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle  voyage was one …
  • … a family Busy as he was with scientific activities, Darwin found time to re-establish family …
  • … close contact. In November 1838, two years after his return, Darwin became engaged to his cousin, …
  • … daughter, Anne Elizabeth, moved to Down House in Kent, where Darwin was to spend the rest of his …
  • … his greatest theoretical achievement, the most important of Darwin’s activities during the years …
  • … identifications of his bird and fossil mammal specimens, Darwin arrived at the daring and momentous …
  • … in species. With this new theoretical point of departure Darwin continued to make notes and explore …
  • … present in the version of 1859. Young author Darwin’s investigation of the species …
  • … the  Beagle  had returned to England, news of some of Darwin’s findings had been spread by the …
  • … great excitement. The fuller account of the voyage and Darwin’s discoveries was therefore eagerly …
  • … suitable categories for individual experts to work upon, Darwin applied himself to the revision of …
  • … of the surveying voyage of H.M.S. Adventure and Beagle. Darwin’s volume bore the title  Journal …
  • … visited by H.M.S. Beagle .  Also in November 1837, Darwin read the fourth of a series of papers to …
  • … to the Society of 9 March 1838), had been developed by Darwin from a suggestion made by his uncle, …
  • … Sedgwick, [after 15 May 1838] ). The new research Darwin undertook after 1837 was an …
  • … time, the parallel terraces, or ‘roads’, of Glen Roy. Darwin had seen similar formations on the …
  • … roads of Glen Roy’,  Collected papers  1: 88–137). Darwin later abandoned this view, calling it a …
  • … contemporaneous unstratified deposits of South America”, Darwin continued to defend his and Lyell’s …
  • … 1842, having heard of evidence of glaciation in North Wales, Darwin made a tour there in order to …
  • … more satisfactorily than any alternative explanation. Darwin eventually relinquished this theory and …
  • … the Beagle voyage In addition to his work on geology Darwin undertook to provide a …
  • … The correspondence provides a nearly complete record of Darwin’s arrangements with the Treasury, his …
  • … G. R. Waterhouse;  Birds , by John Gould;  Fish , by Leonard Jenyns; and  Reptiles , by Thomas …
  • … and habitats of the species. Mr Arthrobalanus Darwin had originally planned to include …
  • … Archipelago off the coast of Chile. These unexpectedly led Darwin to devote eight years (1846–54) …
  • … As the correspondence from these years shows, that work put Darwin in communication with most of the …
  • … and corals by William Lonsdale ( Collected papers , 2). Darwin’s crustacean specimens, originally …
  • … Only the plants were neglected. During the voyage Darwin had expected that J. S. Henslow would …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  …
  • … appeared at the end of 1866 and had told his cousin William Darwin Fox, ‘My work will have to stop a …
  • … material on emotional expression. Yet the scope of Darwin’s interests remained extremely broad, and …
  • … plants, and earthworms, subjects that had exercised Darwin for decades, and that would continue to …
  • … Carl von  Nägeli and perfectibility Darwin’s most substantial addition to  Origin  was a …
  • … a Swiss botanist and professor at Munich (Nägeli 1865). Darwin had considered Nägeli’s paper …
  • … principal engine of change in the development of species. Darwin correctly assessed Nägeli’s theory …
  • … in most morphological features (Nägeli 1865, p. 29). Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now …
  • … are & must be morphological’. The comment highlights Darwin’s apparent confusion about Nägeli’s …
  • … ‘purely morphological’. The modern reader may well share Darwin’s uncertainty, but Nägeli evidently …
  • … pp. 28–9). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical examples he could use …
  • … problems of heredity Another important criticism that Darwin sought to address in the fifth …
  • … prevailing theory of blending inheritance that Jenkin and Darwin both shared, would tend to be lost …
  • … ( Origin  5th ed., pp. 103–4). The terminology that Darwin and others employed in these matters ( …
  • … ‘I must have expressed myself atrociously’, Darwin wrote to Alfred Russel Wallace on 2 February , …
  • … of  Origin  was the result of correspondence between Darwin and the geologist James Croll. In the …
  • … but it was his theory of alternate ice ages that piqued Darwin’s interest the most. He wrote, ‘this …
  • … ( letter to James Croll, 31 January [1869] ). Darwin had argued ( Origin , pp. 377–8) that plant …
  • … would always exist. In  Origin  5th ed., pp. 450–61, Darwin accounted for the survival of tropical …
  • … James Croll,  31 January [1869] ). Croll could not supply Darwin with an estimate of the age of the …
  • … ( letter from James Croll, 4 February 1869 ).  Darwin did not directly challenge Thomson’s …
  • … 19 March [1869] ). Towards Descent Once Darwin had completed revisions of the …
  • … and overseas. The dog-breeder George Cupples worked hard on Darwin’s behalf, sending a steady stream …
  • … sexes in sheep, cattle, horses, and dogs, and circulating Darwin’s queries to various contacts. As …
  • … causing difficulties. The entomologist Frederick Smith, whom Darwin had asked to study the musical …
  • … grandfather, Erasmus, to two of Darwin’s sons (George and Leonard), who had recently excelled in …

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1876 on this website.  The full texts …
  • … The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the …
  • … games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wife … poor creature, has won …
  • … regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to …
  • … a serious concussion from a riding accident, and George Darwin’s ill-health grew worse, echoing …
  • … once, the labour of checking proofs proved a blessing, as Darwin sought solace for the loss of his …
  • … and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and …
  • … had involved much time and effort the previous year, and Darwin clearly wanted to focus his …
  • … When Smith, Elder and Company proposed reissuing two of Darwin’s three volumes of the geology of …
  • … single-volume edition titled Geological observations , Darwin resisted making any revisions at …
  • … meticulous correction of errors in the German editions made Darwin less anxious about correcting the …
  • … to Carus. ( Letter to J. V. Carus, 24 April 1876. ) Darwin focused instead on the second …
  • … concentrated on the ‘means of crossing’, was seen by Darwin as the companion to Cross and self …
  • … return to old work than part of the future work outlined by Darwin in his ‘little Autobiography’ ( …
  • … holiday after finishing Cross and self fertilisation , Darwin took up the suggestion made by a …
  • … for his family only. Writing for an hour every afternoon, Darwin finished his account on 3 August …
  • … dimittis.”’ (‘Recollections’, pp. 418–19). Darwin remained firm in his resolution to …
  • … ever return to the consideration of man.’ In particular, Darwin seemed eager to avoid issues that …
  • … wrote with the good news that he could restore Darwin to a religious life. This transformation would …
  • … enemies... Views such as these were easy enough for Darwin to dismiss, but it was more …
  • … Just four days later, Darwin had the hard task of telling Leonard that Amy, after seeming to recover …
  • … not by hiding the pain of the situation, but by reminding Leonard of how much his friendship had …
  • … & a Prof. Romer came to lunch’, Emma Darwin reported to Leonard Darwin on 29 September (DAR 239 …

Early Days

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment The young Charles Darwin From an early age, Darwin exhibited a keen interest in the natural world. His boyish fascination with naturalist pursuits deepened as he entered college and started to interact with…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … started to interact with fellow natural history enthusiasts. Darwin's correspondence from this …
  • … Under the mentorship of Robert Grant at Edinburgh, Darwin undertook original research about the …
  • … of bryazoan. In correspondence from his student days, Darwin negotiates complicated relationships …
  • … SOURCES Books Browne, Janet. Darwin's Origin of Species: A Biography. (2008 …
  • … so pleasant receiving letters.” Letter 68 —Darwin to William Darwin Fox [15 July 1829] …
  • … to their shared hobby, his rivalry with fellow naturalist Leonard Jennyns, and he expresses anxiety …
  • … visit beetling in Cambridgeshire. Letter 98 —Darwin to Caroline Darwin [28 Apr 1831] …
  • … DISCUSSION QUESTIONS 1. Do you think Darwin resented that his work was published under …
  • … letters to his brother Erasmus? 4. Why do you think Darwin was unable to take courses in …

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … activities for building and maintaining such connections. Darwin's networks extended from his …
  • … when strong institutional structures were largely absent. Darwin had a small circle of scientific …
  • … section contains two sets of letters. The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. …
  • … of wide-ranging species to wide-ranging genera. Darwin and Gray Letter 1674 …
  • … have in simple truth been of the utmost value to me.” Darwin believes species have arisen, like …
  • … or continuous area; they are actual lineal descendants. Darwin discusses fertilisation in the bud …
  • … exchange This collection of letters between Darwin and Hooker, while Darwin was writing his …
  • … followed automatically. On the issue of nomenclature reform, Darwin opposes appending first …
  • … offered the Beagle naturalist appointment first to Leonard Jenyns, who almost accepted, as did …

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children,[1] began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and Animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in…

Matches: 19 hits

  • … Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children,[1] began the …
  • … is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the …
  • … lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on …
  • … the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwin’s notes reveals, he closely …
  • … William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are …
  • … The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwin’s character clearly perceived by Emma during …
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6] For in these notes, Darwin’s deep scientific curiosity transcends his …
  • … that on occasion he refers to William as ‘it’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate …
  • … memories.[8] Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwin’s scientific goal, the notes here …
  • … the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had increased by five: …
  • … the onset of frowning, smiling, etc., as was the focus of Darwin’s attention on William and Anne, …
  • … of logical thought and language. On 20 May 1854, Darwin again took over the notebook and, …
  • … all the notes until July 1856, when the observations ceased. Darwin’s later entries, like Emma’s, …
  • … Transcription: 1 [9] W. Erasmus. Darwin born. Dec. 27 th . 1839.—[10] During first week. …
  • … [15] ‘Annie . . . fortnight’ was written by Emma Darwin on the verso of page 3 and opposite the …
  • … The name and address of a Mrs Locke are noted in Emma Darwin’s 1843 diary. [16] The following …
  • … and family memoirs and reminiscences. [61] Leonard Darwin, born 1850. [62] Francis …
  • … of her childhood, Henrietta Litchfield remembered Leonard Darwin saying this to their maid Jane and …
  • … CUL). [71] Horace Darwin, born 1851. [72] Leonard Darwin’s nickname. [73] Miss …
Page:  1 2  Next