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Emma Darwin

Summary

Emma Darwin, Charles Darwin's wife and first cousin, was born Emma Wedgwood, the eighth and youngest child of Josiah Wedgwood II and Bessy Allen. Her father was the eldest son of the famous pottery manufacturer, Josiah Wedgwood I. Her mother was one…

Matches: 10 hits

  • Emma Darwin, Charles Darwin's wife and first cousin, was born Emma Wedgwood, the eighth and …
  • … children brought up in a remote country house in Wales. Emma was part of a large and lively extended …
  • … father's eldest sister, Susannah, had married Robert Waring Darwin of Shrewsbury, and had six …
  • … found Maer at times more cheerful than his own home. It was Emma's father he turned to for …
  • … by fields. Eight more children were born (Mary, Henrietta Emma, George Howard, Elizabeth, Francis, …
  • … Charles Waring), and Anne died at the age of 10. Charles and Emma also cared for their grandson …
  • … London to stay with relatives two or three times a year, and Emma also managed to organise holidays …
  • … on the American Civil War). After Charles's death, Emma divided her time between Down …
  • … Horace also lived in Cambridge. Despite the fact that Emma and Charles were rarely separated …
  • … home. A great deal of her correspondence survives in the Darwin Archive–CUL, along with her …

Henrietta Emma Darwin

Summary

Henrietta “Etty” Darwin (1843–1927) was the eldest of Charles Darwin’s daughters to reach adulthood. She married Richard Buckley Litchfield in 1871. She was a valued editor to her father as well as companion and correspondent to both of her parents.…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … Henrietta “Etty” Darwin (1843–1927) was the eldest of Charles Darwin’s daughters to reach adulthood. …
  • … Henrietta provided far more than grammatical assistance; Darwin asked her to help clarify and …
  • … or brothers, Henrietta was an essential lynchpin in the Darwin circle, and helped anchor both the …

Dining at Down House

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Dining, Digestion, and Darwin's Domestic Life While Darwin is best remembered for his scientific accomplishments, he greatly valued and was strongly influenced by his domestic life. Darwin's…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … Questions | Experiment Dining, Digestion, and Darwin's Domestic Life …
  • … and they partook in his scientific endeavours. One of Darwin's defining characteristics …
  • … provides into the bright and engaging personalities of the Darwin children and of family life in the …
  • … Dining at Down House Letter 259 —Charles Darwin to Caroline Darwin, 13 October …
  • … South American cities, cultures, geography, flora and fauna) Darwin complains to his sister Caroline …
  • … traveling on horseback while ill. Letter 465 —Emma Wedgwood (Emma Darwin) to Charles …
  • … agreeable” for her sake. Letter 3626 —Emma Darwin to T. G. Appleton, 28 June [1862] …
  • … on the difficulties of finding a suitable cook. Emma Darwin to Henrietta Darwin, [4 …
  • … among other things, for Darwin’s complaints. Emma Darwin to Henrietta Darwin, [14 April …
  • … who was travelling in the south of France at the time, Emma describes typical nineteenth-century …
  • … Scottish medium, Daniel Dunglass Home, with Galton. Emma Darwin to Henrietta Darwin, [4 …
  • … taste of Darwin's life at Down House, recreate recipes from Emma Darwin's cookbook and …

Interview with Randal Keynes

Summary

Randal Keynes is a great-great-grandson of Charles Darwin, and the author of Annie’s Box (Fourth Estate, 2001), which discusses Darwin’s home life, his relationship with his wife and children, and the ways in which these influenced his feelings about…

Matches: 17 hits

  • … University Library - in the Keynes Room! - visiting the Darwin Correspondence Project. Randal is a …
  • … Your book seems to counter prevailing popular portraits of Darwin as the solitary genius, and of …
  • … any historian of science, that the great achievements, like Darwin's, and many others, are not …
  • … [of] all the scientist's colleagues. 6. Darwin's poetic sensibility …
  • … Yes. 7. How, and what, do we know of Darwin's opinions about religion? …
  • … out from letters that other people wrote to him, especially Emma. We have her side of a small …
  • … was questioning hard. He also had to think very hard because Emma wanted him to share her belief; …
  • … through the 1830s after he really sort of engaged with Emma, into the 1840s, through the 1850s with …
  • … put my faith in?. The big difference between him and Emma was that while he based his beliefs …
  • … there for the explanation of the difficulties Darwin and Emma had with each other's beliefs and …
  • … to.? Dr White: Right. 9. Emma Darwin's influence and struggle …
  • … but within this context of a marriage and family life, and Emma, who's often been portrayed as …
  • … Randal Keynes: Yes. I think the first point about Emma is that she was almost a year older than …
  • … Randal Keynes: And there's one comment [about Emma] by their daughter Henrietta that in her …
  • … 10. Parallels between Darwin's occupation and Emma's faith Dr White: …
  • … mainly a morality that he could accept. He felt always, with Emma, that there was no argument about …
  • … I think that you draw a contrast, in your book, between Emma's Christian belief that suffering …

Engagement to Emma Wedgwood

Summary

Darwin proposes to his cousin, Emma Wedgwood, and is accepted

Matches: 1 hits

  • Darwin proposes to his cousin, Emma Wedgwood, and is accepted …

'An Appeal' against animal cruelty

Summary

The four-page pamphlet transcribed below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [29 September 1863]). The pamphlet, which protested against the cruelty of steel vermin…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see …
  • … of steel vermin-traps, was privately printed in July, and Emma organised the distribution of the …
  • … 1872, pp. 99–100, 1 April 1874, p. 56). Charles and Emma distributed the 'Appeal' …
  • … that a prize should be offered for a humane trap, and Emma accordingly sent out papers for …
  • … for distributing the 'cruelty pamphlet', and letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, 8 …
  • … paper Animal World , and prominently linked Charles Darwin"s name to the offer of a prize …
  • … campaign had little direct effect (Moss 1961, pp. 146–7, Emma Darwin 2: 200). Although …
  • … than the possible alternatives (see letter from E. L. Darwin, 7 September 1863, letter from Emma
  • … in 1877 ( Spectator , 6 January 1877, p. 15, and Emma Darwin 2: 200–1). While Emma

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

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  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …
  • … Elizabeth (9) Darwin, Emma (191) …
  • … Hermenegildo (1) Gisborne, Emma (1) …
  • … J.-B. P. (1) Gärtner, Emma (2) …
  • … Niven, James (1) Nixon, Emma (1) …
  • … Peel, Jonathan (5) Pender, Emma (1) …
  • … Elizabeth (11) Wedgwood, Emma (191) …
  • … Wrigley, Alfred (8) Wuttke, Emma (1) …

What did Darwin believe?

Summary

What did Darwin really believe about God? the Christian revelation? the implications of his theory of evolution for religious faith? These questions were asked again and again in the years following the publication of Origin of species (1859). They are…

Matches: 24 hits

  • … What did Darwin really believe about God? the Christian revelation? the implications of …
  • … rhetoric of crusading secularists, many of whom take Darwin as an icon. But Darwin was very …
  • … Letters became an important medium through which Darwin’s readers sought to draw him out on matters …
  • … the religious implications of his work. Letters written to Darwin by persons unknown to him became …
  • … own. Mary Boole’s letter In December 1866 Darwin received a letter from Mary Boole, a …
  • … See the letter Boole, like a number of Darwin’s readers, found a way of reconciling the …
  • … with some form of religious belief. But when Boole asks Darwin about specific points of belief, such …
  • … See the letter In his response to Boole, Darwin implies that certain questions are beyond …
  • … Science, or by the so called “inner consciousness”’. Darwin does not dismiss different forms of …
  • … into such territory in this letter to a stranger. Emma Darwin In what is …
  • … mind. See the letter In this letter, Darwin is quite clear that he has never …
  • … he says, is often in a state of flux. What did Darwin mean by the term “agnostic”? The word …
  • … be answered by science, and other questions that can not. Darwin had made this point in his response …
  • … matters many years earlier with his cousin and fiancée, Emma Wedgewood. In their correspondence, …
  • … but we gain a sense of what the couple discussed from Emma’s words to him: My reason …
  • … It is clear from other correspondence that one of Emma’s most cherished beliefs was in an afterlife. …
  • … she means so in eternity. There is a marked tension in Emma’s letter between reason and feeling, and …
  • … to himself, and allowed his differences of belief with Emma to remain for the most part submerged. …
  • … members of the Darwin family, offer a fuller perspective on Emma’s religious beliefs. The documents …
  • … over Scriptural or doctrinal authority, as a foundation for Emma’s views. They also show that Emma’s …
  • … Josiah Wedgwood, who was grandfather to both Charles and Emma, was a Unitarian, and this religious …
  • … Unitarian school in Shrewsbury. The circle with whom he and Emma socialised when in London included …
  • … were regular guests of Darwin’s brother Erasmus, and of Emma’s brother, Hensleigh Wedgwood and his …
  • … liturgy. But we know, from Francis Darwin’s comments, that Emma used to make the family turn round …

George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans)

Summary

George Eliot was the pen name of celebrated Victorian novelist Mary Ann Evans (1819-1880). She was born on the outskirts of Nuneaton in Warwickshire and was educated at boarding schools from the age of five until she was 16. Her education ended when she…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … novels, under her pen name, achieved great acclaim. Darwin and his family were keen readers …
  • … afternoons, when they received visitors (23 March 1873; Emma described his visit in a letter to …
  • … was positive, also encouraging him to call again and bring Emma. In fact, Emma and her younger …
  • … started ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18 January [1874] ). Darwin took Emma to a Sunday afternoon at …

New features for Charles Darwin's 208th birthday

Summary

The website has been updated with an interactive timeline (try it!) and enhanced secondary school resources for ages 11-14. What's more, the full texts of the letters for 1872 are now online for the first time, and a selection of Darwin's…

Matches: 5 hits

  • … are now online for the first time, and a selection of Darwin's correspondence with women …
  • … Thomas Henry Huxley , Mary Treat , Charles Lyell , Emma Darwin , Asa Gray ). You can …
  • … resources for 11-14 years and find out: What made Darwin angry on the Beagle voyage? Why did he …
  • … and tested in the classroom. Over six hundred of Darwin's letters from 1872 are now …
  • … published Descent of man , and the preparation of Darwin's next book Expression of the …

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children,[1] began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and Animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children,[1] began the …
  • … is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the …
  • … lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on …
  • … the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwin’s notes reveals, he closely …
  • … William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are …
  • … The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwin’s character clearly perceived by Emma during …
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6] For in these notes, Darwin’s deep scientific curiosity transcends his …
  • … that on occasion he refers to William as ‘it’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate …
  • … memories.[8] Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwin’s scientific goal, the notes here …
  • … period but in far less detail. By September 1844, Henrietta Emma was one year old, and there are a …
  • … the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had increased by five: …
  • … 1850; and Horace, born 18 May 1851. It appears to have been Emma who resumed the observations on the …
  • … of logical thought and language. On 20 May 1854, Darwin again took over the notebook and, …
  • … certainly during first fortnight at sudden sounds. & at Emma’s moving 3 [11]  When …
  • … & inwards as in sleep.[14] Six weeks old & 3 days, Emma saw him smile—not only with …
  • … his eyes becoming fixed & the movements of his arms ceasing. Emma argues that his smiles were …
  • … made in the little noises he was uttering that he recognized Emma by sight when she came close to …
  • … been caused by the novelty of the situation producing fear. Emma thinks that when he was vaccinated …
  • … whole expression appearing pleased.— Recognizes Emma Anne & myself perfectly— does not find …
  • … Lady” were repeated.— 26 th . Cried, when Emma left off playing the pianoforte.— Did this …
  • … Anny says Papa pretty clearly—[40] A few days ago Emma gave her doll, but she sensibly shuddered, …
  • … to play with in farther part of room, she immediately led Emma by the hand towards the tea-chest. I …
  • … on quite suddenly.—[43] On the 13 th . of March Emma positively ascertained that what the …

The death of Anne Elizabeth Darwin

Summary

Charles and Emma Darwin’s eldest daughter, Annie, died at the age of ten in 1851.   Emma was heavily pregnant with their fifth son, Horace, at the time and could not go with Charles when he took Annie to Malvern to consult the hydrotherapist, Dr Gully.…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … We have lost the joy of the Household Charles and Emma Darwin’s eldest daughter, Annie, …
  • … to Malvern to consult the hydrotherapist, Dr Gully. Darwin wrote a memorial of his daughter …
  • … recorded her own reactions in a poignant set of notes, which Emma Darwin kept. Links to a …
  • … and illness follow the transcriptions. Charles Darwin’s memorial of Anne Elizabeth …
  • … over any story at all melancholy; or on parting with Emma even for the shortest interval. Once when …
  • … this showed itself in never being easy without touching Emma, when in bed with her, & quite …
  • … dressed herself up in a silk gown, cap, shawl & gloves of Emma, appearing in figure like a …
  • … over  ‘y. 4 An interlineation in pencil in Emma Darwin’s hand reads: ‘Mamma: what shall …
  • … death To W. D. Fox, [ 27 March 1851 ] To Emma Darwin,  [17 April 1851] …

Darwin soundbites

Summary

From atheistical cats to old fogies in Cambridge, we've collected some of Darwin's pithier remarks - some funny, some serious - but all quotes from letters you can read in full here. We particularly like this one: Will you be so kind as…

Matches: 5 hits

  • … cats to old fogies in Cambridge, we've collected some of Darwin's pithier remarks - some …
  • … legible. Where's it from? Not seen Darwin’s handwriting? – try reading …
  • … married Where's it from? On his wife, Emma I have had my day …
  • … life is one of ceasless trouble & anxiety. (Darwin misspelled 'ceaseless', …
  • … on my armour.— Where's it from? Darwin on Life (and being a modified ape) …

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Darwin and women: a selection of letters

Summary

A shorter version of this film is available on the Cambridge University Press video stream.   Darwin and Women focusses on Darwin's correspondence with women and on the lives of the women he knew and wrote to. It includes a large number of…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … University Press video stream .   Darwin and Women focusses on Darwin's …
  • … number of hitherto unpublished letters between members of Darwin's family and their friends …
  • … servants, that set them in an accessible narrative context. Darwin's famous remarks on women& …
  • … from the book's editor, Samantha Evans, in her blogs on ' Emma Darwin and women's …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 7 hits

  • … as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified …
  • … Louis Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwin… and acts as …
  • … being a part of [an unpublished] manuscript. Darwin settles down to write. His tone is …
  • … THE CONCURRENCE OF BOTANISTS: 1855 In which Darwin initiates a long-running correspondence …
  • … gossip about difficult colleagues (Agassiz). Gray realizes Darwin is not revealing all of his …
  • … Thank God he will never suffer more in this world. Poor Emma behaved nobly and how she stood it all …
  • … DARWIN:  My wife’s remark on reading this, was EMMA: Why, you know nothing about Logic. …

Evolution: Selected Letters of Charles Darwin 1860-1870

Summary

This selection of Charles Darwin’s letters includes correspondence with his friends and scientific colleagues around the world; letters by the critics who tried to stamp out his ideas, and by admirers who helped them to spread. It takes up the story of…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … This selection of Charles Darwin’s letters includes correspondence with his friends and scientific …
  • … admirers who helped them to spread. It takes up the story of Darwin’s life in 1860, in the immediate …
  • … of publication of Descent of Man in 1871. In this period Darwin became a public figure, and the …
  • … worked up, or their religious doubts and concerns for Darwin’s own soul. Darwin himself used letters …
  • … world a questionnaire on the expression of the emotions. Darwin also continued to confide in his …
  • … yet been pointed out to me. No doubt many will be. Darwin to Huxley, 1860. …
  • … when I know you have been miserably uncomfortable. Emma to Charles Darwin, 1861. …
  • … what you think about the derivation of Species … Darwin to Charles Lyell, 1863. …
  • … was quite out of balance once during our voyage … Darwin to Hooker (on hearing of Robert …
  • … that the necks of your horses are badly galled … Darwin to a local landowner, 1866. …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a …
  • … community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women …
  • … Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin …
  • … garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwin’s …
  • … her observations on the expression of emotion in dogs with Emma Darwin. Letter 8676 …
  • … 1868] Darwin’s nephew, Edmund, writes to Emma Darwin’s sister, Sarah, with observations of …
  • Darwin’s nephews, Edmund and Charles, write to Emma Darwin’s sister, Sarah, with observations of …
  • … Wedgwood, S. E. & J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] Emma’s sister, Sarah, passes on …
  • … E. to Darwin, W. E., [January 23rd 1887]: Emma Darwin tells her eldest son, William, …
  • … E. to Darwin, W. E. , (March, 1862 - DAR 219.1:49) Emma Darwin updates her son, William, …
  • … is a great critic”, thought the article worth reprinting, Emma was less convinced. Letter …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 24 hits

  • … dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwin’s son George dominated the second …
  • … and traveller Alexander von Humboldt’s 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt …
  • … ). The death of a Cambridge friend, Albert Way, caused Darwin’s cousin, William Darwin Fox, to …
  • … from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one …
  • … I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a week’s visit to …
  • … Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that …
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in …
  • … 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and sceptics Darwin excused himself for reasons of …
  • … by George Henry Lewes and Marian Evans (George Eliot), but Darwin excused himself, finding it too …
  • … the month, another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwin’s cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those …
  • … imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin agreed that it was ‘all imposture’ …
  • … stop word getting to America of the ‘strange news’ that Darwin had allowed ‘a spirit séance’ at his …
  • … the first three months of the year and, like many of Darwin’s enterprises in the 1870s, were family …
  • … 21, letter to Smith, Elder & Co., 17 December [1873] ). Darwin himself had some trouble in …
  • … and letter to Charles Lyell, [13 January 1874] ). Darwin blamed his illness for the …
  • … . In his preface ( Coral reefs  2d ed., pp. v–vii), Darwin reasserted the priority of his work. …
  • … for the absence of coral-reefs in certain locations. Darwin countered with the facts that low …
  • … whole coastline of a large island. Dana also thought that Darwin had seen fringing reefs as proof of …
  • … satisfaction. Assisted in the wording by his wife, Emma, and daughter Henrietta, he finally wrote a …
  • … a comfortable cabin ( see letter from Leonard Darwin to Emma Darwin, [after 26 June -- 28 September …
  • … to become Darwin’s secretary. They rented Down Lodge and Emma Darwin wrote, ‘They have . . . made …
  • … the average in prettiness & snugness’ ( letter from Emma Darwin to J. B. Innes, 12 October …
  • … letter to Down School Board, [after 29 November 1873] ). Emma saw a ‘great blessing’ in the rumour …
  • … dead uncle’s position of vicar of Deptford ( letter from Emma Darwin to J. B. Innes, 12 October …

Religion

Summary

Design|Personal Belief|Beauty|The Church Perhaps the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same can be said of the evolution controversy today; however the nature of the disputes and the manner in…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same …
  • … nineteenth century were different in important ways. Many of Darwin's leading supporters were …
  • … their religious beliefs with evolutionary theory. Darwin's own writing, both in print and …
  • … much as possible. A number of correspondents tried to draw Darwin out on his own religious views, …
  • … political contexts. Design Darwin was not the first to challenge …
  • … on the controversial topic of design. The first is between Darwin and Harvard botanist Asa Gray, …
  • … second is a single letter from naturalist A. R. Wallace to Darwin on design and natural selection. …
  • … of each fragment at the base of my precipice”. Darwin and Wallace Letter 5140 …
  • … fittest” instead of “Natural Selection”. Wallace urges Darwin to stress frequency of variations. …
  • … of his own family. Letter 441 — Wedgwood, Emma to Darwin, C. R., [21–22 Nov 1838] …
  • … conscientious doubts”. Letter 471 — Darwin, Emma to Darwin, C. R., [c. Feb 1839] …
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