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Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 17 hits

  • On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July
  • of dimorphic plants with Williams help; he also ordered a selection of new climbing plants for his
  • 52 hours without vomiting!! In the same month, Darwin began to consult William Jenner, …
  • physician-in-ordinary to Queen Victoria. Jenner prescribed a variety of antacids and purgatives, and
  • the dimorphic aquatic cut-grass  Leersia . In May, Darwin finished his paper on  Lythrum
  • continued throughout the summer. When he finished a preliminary draft of his paper on climbing
  • he had set aside the previous summer. In October, Darwin let his friends know that on his
  • and he received more letters of advice from Jenner. In a letter of 15 December [1864] to the
  • As Darwin explained to his cousin William Darwin Fox in a letter of 30 November [1864] , ‘the
  • arose over the grounds on which it was conferred, brought a dramatic conclusion to the year. Darwin
  • …  five years earlier. His primary botanical preoccupation in 1864 was climbing plants. He had become
  • … ( Correspondence  vol. 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] , Darwin wrote to Hooker: ‘The
  • …  produce tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). Darwins excitement about his
  • … & therefore sacred’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 June [1864] ). When Darwin asked Oliver
  • Menyanthes  ( letter from Emma and Charles Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [20 May 1864] ), or his
  • circulating with the 1864 subscription fund ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 1 February [1864] ). …
  • … … & too light to turn into candlesticks’ ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 1 December 1864 ). …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 12 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If any
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • or in satisfying female preference in the mating process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that his
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • early as 1865, the two-volume work appeared in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing
  • the work in November 1867 and had expected to complete it in a fortnight. But at Darwins request, …
  • the text. This increased the amount of work substantially. Darwin asked Murray to intervene, …
  • prepared to throw the Index overboardthough it would be a great loss to the Book’. But Darwins
  • sympathised, replying on 14 January , ‘I sh d  have a very bad heart, as hard as stone, if it
  • and had himself watched elephants cry (letters to W. E. Darwin, [15 March 1868] and 8 April

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 16 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwins
  • officinalis . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] …
  • home in South Africa. Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May
  • to Darwins queries about Expression during a trip to Egypt. Letter 7223
  • January 1868] Darwin asks Thomas Huxley to pass on a questionnaire to his wife, Henrietta. …
  • 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] Darwins
  • of wormholes. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] …
  • her nieces ears. Letter 8701 - Lubbock, E. F . to Darwin, [1873] Ellen
  • … [23 April 1874] Thereza Story-Maskelyne responds to a letter of Darwins which was
  • insects. Men: Letter 2221 - Blyth, E. to Darwin, [22 February 1858] …
  • Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] Darwin thanks Hooker for
  • New Zealand. Letter 6453 - Langton, E. to Wedgwood, S. E., [9 November 1868] …
  • …  - Wright, Charles to Gray, A., [20, 25, 26 March & 1 April 1864] Charles Wright tells

Diagrams and drawings in letters

Summary

Over 850 illustrations from the printed volumes of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin have been added to the online transcripts of the letters. The contents include maps, diagrams, drawings, sketches and photographs, covering geological, botanical,…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … [1–23 July 1841] William Hopkins's comments on a compass diagram designed to show the …
  • … 1872 CD asks G. C. Wallich for the negative of a photograph of smiling girl (enclosed) and …
  • … containing bud samples,  12 May 1878 G. H. Darwin's drawings of  Thalia dealbata  …
  • … 1879 Anthony Rich's description of the movement of a caterpillar,  1 July 1879 …

Natural Science and Femininity

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters A conflation of masculine intellect and feminine thoughts, habits and feelings, male naturalists like Darwin inhabited an uncertain gendered identity. Working from the private domestic comfort of their homes and exercising…

Matches: 14 hits

  • Discussion Questions | Letters A conflation of masculine intellect and feminine
  • feminine powers of feeling and aesthetic appreciation, Darwin and his male colleagues struggled to
  • Letters Letter 109 - Wedgwood, J. to Darwin, R. W., [31 August 1831] Darwin
  • professional work on his return. Letter 158 - Darwin to Darwin, R. W., [8 & 26
  • the development of his two-month-oldanimalcule of a son", William. Darwins roles as father
  • in Expression and in an 1877 article titled, ‘ A Biographical Sketch of an Infant ’. …
  • had gathered and brought into the house immediately after a rain storm. Here, Darwins scientific
  • domestic family life. Letter 4377 - Haeckel, E. P. A. to Darwin, [2 January 1864] …
  • Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] Darwin thanks Hooker for
  • Letter 4469 - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [20 April 1864] Hooker discusses the scientific
  • work, engage in thestruggle for lifeand becomea useful self-supportingmember of the public
  • Letter 4472 - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [26 or 27 April 1864] Hooker once again discusses
  • believes that Scott ought to engage in drudgerylike a manandoccupy the rest of his time with
  • conducted in his home. Letter 6453 - Langton, E. to Wedgwood, S. E., [9 November 1868] …

'An Appeal' against animal cruelty

Summary

The four-page pamphlet transcribed below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [29 September 1863]). The pamphlet, which protested against the cruelty of steel vermin…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … ( Bromley Record , 1 September 1863, p. 168). In addition, a version of the pamphlet was published …
  • … The Darwins’ 'Appeal' appears to have been inspired by a series of letters published in …
  • … William Howitt, drew attention to the scale of trapping on a game-preserving estate in North Wales, …
  • … for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Annual Report, 1864, p. 32; Animal World , 1 February …
  • … distributed the 'Appeal' to their own acquaintances, and to 'a good many persons …
  • … the campaign than she expected (see the letter from Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, [2 …
  • … Fox, [29 September 1863]). Several responses suggested that a prize should be offered for a humane …
  • … account book (Down House MS), 20 August 1863, recording a payment of £2 11 s. 6 d. for …
  • … with the RSPCA; however, the RSPCA Annual Report for 1864 records that 'a benevolent lady, …
  • … the Royal Horticultural Gardens, South Kensington, in June 1864 ( The Times , 27 May 1864, p. 11, …
  • … paper Animal World , and prominently linked Charles Darwin"s name to the offer of a prize …
  • … were 'awakening to its barbarity' (RSPCA Annual Report 1864, p. 32), the use of the steel …
  • … payments being recorded from 1854 to 1861, in 1863 and 1864, from 1871 to 1875, and in 1878 and 1880 …

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 17 hits

  • … | Class | Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections
  • activities for building and maintaining such connections. Darwin's networks extended from his
  • Bonds of friendship were very important in science in a period when strong institutional structures
  • controversy, or personal loss. Letter writing was not only a means of sustaining such friendships
  • section contains two sets of letters. The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. …
  • about Hookers thoughts. Letter 729Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., [11 Jan 1844] …
  • not immutable. He admits to Hookerit is like confessing a murder”. Letter 736 — …
  • and questions Gray on the alpine flora of the USA. He sends a list of plants from Grays Manual of
  • C. R. to Gray, Asa, 20 July [1857] Darwin writes a challenging letter to Gray, saying: “But my
  • why he believes species of the same genus generally have a common or continuous area; they are
  • Letter 4463Scott, John to Darwin, C. R., 14 Apr [1864] Scott thanks Darwin for his
  • Letter 4468Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 19 [Apr 1864] Darwin makes another plea to his
  • Letter 4469Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 20 Apr 1864 Hooker again refuses to help Scott, …
  • Letter 4471Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 25 Apr [1864] Darwin thinks his friend Kew
  • Letter 4611Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 13 Sept [1864] Darwin sends abstract of John Scott
  • … . Letter 4260aDarwin, C. R. to Becker, L. E., 2 Aug [1863] Darwin thanks Lydia
  • Letter 4441Becker, Lydia to Darwin, C. R., 30 Mar 1864 Becker sends Darwin a copy of her

Science: A Man’s World?

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth-century women participated in the world of science, be it as experimenters, observers, editors, critics, producers, or consumers. Despite this, much of the…

Matches: 10 hits

  • Discussion Questions | Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth
  • Letters Darwins Notes On Marriage [April - July 1838] In these notes, …
  • of family, home and sociability. Letter 489 - Darwin to Wedgwood, E., [20 January 1839] …
  • theories, & accumulating facts in silence & solitude”. Darwin also comments that he has
  • by”. Letter 3715 - Claparède, J. L. R. A. E. to Darwin, [6 September 1862] …
  • Self-taught insemi-masculine education”, Royer is asingular individual whose attractions are not
  • she has read Lamarcks work under her own steam and is afirst rate critic”. Letter 4377
  • of feminine works”. Letter 4441 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [30 March 1864] …
  • pedantic”. Letter 6976 - Darwin to Blackwell, A. B., [8 November 1869] Darwin
  • to women. Letter 10746Darwin to Dicey, E. M., [1877] Darwin gives his

Have you read the one about....

Summary

... the atheistical cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some serious - but all letters you can read here.

Matches: 1 hits

  • … cats, or the old fogies in Cambridge? We've suggested a few - some funny, some serious - but …

Darwin's notes for his physician, 1865

Summary

On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher who had studied medicine in London and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863 Chapman started to treat…

Matches: 10 hits

  • On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher
  • Chapman wasnt the first medical practitioner Darwin contacted around this timeIn 1863, Darwin
  • more attacks of vomiting and seeking another opinion, Darwin wrote to ChapmanOn the day that
  • life (the section, ‘I feel nearlyfood’, is in Emma Darwins hand). Darwin began the ice
  • given up the treatment (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865]). …
  • Busk, 28 April 1865). In November and December 1863, Darwin had consulted the stomach
  • solutions to aid digestion ( Correspondence vol. 11, Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, 8 December [1863]) …
  • Correspondence vol. 12, letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 April [1864], letter from William Jenner to
  • reading, brings on these Head symptoms ?? nervousness when E. leaves me. (What I vomit
  • Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, Darwin Evolution Collection (3314) and is

3.5 William Darwin, photo 2

Summary

< Back to Introduction Darwin’s son William, who had become a banker in Southampton, took the opportunity of a short visit home to Down House in April 1864 to photograph his father afresh. This half-length portrait was the first to show Darwin with a…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … &lt; Back to Introduction Darwins son William, who had become a banker in Southampton, …
  • outfor copies, and would beenchantedby Darwins new persona. When Asa Gray received the
  • from Christs College days, Benjamin Dann Walsh, thought Darwin looked little changed, except for
  • Naudin also received copies of Williams photograph, Darwin explaining to the latter that he hadno
  • bringing down the tables of the law to the Israelites, a newly unveiled mural in the House of
  • features ofIgnorant’, ‘InsaneandIdiotic’. Darwin himself, in a letter of 1848, had jested that
  • of course more fashionable, but the dramatic luxuriance of Darwins beard (untrimmed except round
  • among the prints that William posted to his father in May 1864, since the photograph subsequently
  • simply inscribed by hand on the back in pencilC. Darwin 1864’ – the accuracy of the dating
  • Erasmus Darwin  
 date of creation April 1864 
 computer-readable date 1864-04
  • William Darwins letter to his father [19 May 1864] sending prints of his recent photograph (DCP
  • German edition, from 4 th English edition (Stuttgart: E. Schweizerbart, 1867), frontispiece

Darwin in letters, 1882: Nothing too great or too small

Summary

In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous October, and for the first time in decades he was not working on another book. He remained active in botanical research, however. Building on his recent studies in plant…

Matches: 21 hits

  • In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous
  • chlorophyll by examining thin slices of plant tissue under a microscope. When not experimenting, he
  • for scientific colleagues or their widows facing hardship. Darwin had suffered from poor health
  • more weak than usual. To Lawson Tait, he remarked, ‘I feel a very old man, &amp; my course is nearly
  • early April, he was being carried upstairs with the aid of a special chair. The end came on 19 April
  • 1881. But some of his scientific friends quickly organised a campaign for Darwin to have greater
  • Botanical observation and experiment had long been Darwins greatest scientific pleasure. The year
  • to Fritz Müller, 4 January 1882 ). These were topics that Darwin had been investigating for years, …
  • working at the effects of Carbonate of Ammonia on roots,’ Darwin wrote, ‘the chief result being that
  • the nature of their contents, if immersed for some hours in a weak solution of C. of Ammonia’. …
  • London on 6 and 16 March, respectively. In January, Darwin corresponded with George John
  • vol. 28, letter from Arthur de Souza Corrêa, 20 October 1880 , and Correspondence vol. 29, …
  • up the results on Brazilian cane, with Darwin providing a detailed outline: ‘I had no intention to
  • the flowers &amp; experimentising on them’ ( letter to J. E. Todd, 10 April 1882 ). While
  • he is a good deal depressed about himself’ (letter from H. E. Litchfield to G. H. Darwin, 17 March
  • is very calm but she has cried a little’ (letter from H. E. Litchfield to G. H. Darwin, [19 April
  • overflowing in tenderness’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, 10 May 1882 (DAR 219.1: 150)). …
  • he had witnessed an earthquake in 1835 ( letter from R. E. Alison, [MarchJuly 1835 ]). …
  • without any mercy’ ( letter from Emma Wedgwood to F. E. E. Wedgwood, [28 October 1836] , letter
  • able to work’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [ c . 10 April 1864] ). To the physician Henry Holland, …
  • History every day’ ( letter to Henry Holland, 6 November [1864] ). Writing to the clergyman and

Was Darwin an ecologist?

Summary

One of the most fascinating aspects of Charles Darwin’s correspondence is the extent to which the experiments he performed at his home in Down, in the English county of Kent, seem to prefigure modern scientific work in ecology.

Matches: 19 hits

  • I gave two seeds to a confounded old cock, but his gizzard ground them up; at least I cd. not find
  • merely by birds accidentally dropping them. The case is a sore puzzle to me.— Charles
  • or regurgitated by birds with non-muscular gizzards (e.g. toucans) would have lower germination
  • One of the most fascinating aspects of Charles Darwins correspondence is the extent to which the
  • work in ecology. Despite the difference in language between Darwins letter and the modern
  • in seeds that have no nutritive value. Other subjects that Darwin worked on at Down also have
  • from the ones we tend to take for granted today. Ecology as a discipline did not then exist: even
  • was becoming well enough established in universities that Darwinsheld together with a piece of
  • explained’ (quoted in Chadarevian 1996, pp. 1718). As a gentleman amateur, observing his
  • between organisms over timewere highly innovative. Darwins own experiments challenged the old, …
  • and at the same time also challenged the notion that only a laboratory could serve as the place in
  • tradition in the field. Modern ecology A great deal is wrapped up in our modern idea
  • which draws on the other three strands just mentioned, is a broadly based political movement which
  • it is an ideaor set of ideaswith many roots, and a correspondingly complex history. …
  • clearly did not mark an epoch in the history of science; Darwin and some of his correspondents
  • The word first appeared in English in E. Ray Lankesters translation of Haeckels History of
  • evolution of species’, Haeckel wrote to Darwin on 9 July 1864 . ‘In your book I found all at once
  • is by contrast extremely modest. In a letter written in 1864 and enigmatically datedAug. Oct 8th.’ …
  • Natürliche Schöpfungsgeschichte . Translation revised by E. Ray Lankester. 2 vols. London: Henry S. …

Religion

Summary

Design|Personal Belief|Beauty|The Church Perhaps the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same can be said of the evolution controversy today; however the nature of the disputes and the manner in…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same …
  • … nineteenth century were different in important ways. Many of Darwin's leading supporters were …
  • … their religious beliefs with evolutionary theory. Darwin's own writing, both in print and …
  • … although he tended to avoid the subject as much as possible. A number of correspondents tried to …
  • … political contexts. Design Darwin was not the first to challenge …
  • … on the controversial topic of design. The first is between Darwin and Harvard botanist Asa Gray, …
  • … Gray and tells him Origin has “stirred up the mud with a vengeance”; Gray and three or four …
  • … for the attention now given to the subject. He poses Gray a question on design in nature, as he is …
  • … He also discusses his views on design. He shares a witty thought experiment about an angel. …
  • … Letter 5307 — Darwin, C. R. to Boole, M. E., 14 Dec 1866 Darwin believes he is unable to …
  • … Letter 8070 — Darwin, C. R. to Abbot, F. E., 16 Nov [1871] Darwin explains why he must …
  • … of Argyll’s address to the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1864), Darwin used birds, flowers and …
  • … of Argyll’s address [to the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1864)] on beauty and sexual selection. He …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 16 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now
  • all but the concluding chapter of the work was submitted by Darwin to his publisher in December. …
  • hypothesis of hereditary transmission. Debate about Darwins theory of transmutation
  • of special creation on the basis of alleged evidence of a global ice age, while Asa Gray pressed
  • for the Advancement of Science. Fuller consideration of Darwins work was given by Hooker in an
  • the details of Hookers proposed talk formed the basis of a lengthy and lively exchange of letters
  • responded philosophically to these deaths, regarding both as a merciful release from painful illness
  • dimorphism and trimorphism, published between 1861 and 1864, which raised questions about hybrid
  • after the startling apparition of your face at R.S. Soirèewhich I dreamed of 2 nights running. …
  • on those terms so you are in for it’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [  c . 10 May 1866] ). …
  • Georg Bronn, had been published in 1860 and 1863 by the firm E. Schweizerbartsche
  • wasmerely ordinaryly diœcious’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [7 May11 June 1866] ). On
  • a case of dimorphic becoming diœcious’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, 20 June [1866] ). Darwin
  • I am well accustomed to such explosions’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 22 June [1866] ). He urged
  • an expression first used by Herbert Spencer in an 1864 instalment of  Principles of biology . ( …
  • indeed at poor Susans loneliness’ ( letter from E. C. Langton to Emma and Charles Darwin, [6 and 7

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 17 hits

  • The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • and cosseting regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm
  • Cross and self fertilisation , that the family suffered a devastating loss. The Darwins must have
  • expected in September. Their joy at the safe delivery of a healthy boy was soon replaced by anguish
  • his anxiety about Francis. By the end of the year there was a different order at Down House with
  • had involved much time and effort the previous year, and Darwin clearly wanted to focus his
  • Origin for the very last time, and made minor changes to a reprint of the second edition of
  • voyage, Volcanic islands and South America , in a new single-volume edition titled
  • was neverthelessfirmly resolved not even to look at a single proof ’. Perhaps Caruss meticulous
  • to Asa Gray, 28 January 1876). Revising Orchids was less a return to old work than part of the
  • we have &amp; you are one of the best of all’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 11 September [1876] ). …
  • she confided to Henrietta (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [31 August 1876] (DAR 219.9: …
  • herself &amp; is so tender’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [13 September 1876] (DAR 210.6
  • completed autobiography (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [13 September 1876] (DAR 210.6: …
  • horticulturists and agriculturists in France ( letter from E. M. Heckel, 27 December 1876 ). In
  • from different forms of dimorphic and trimorphic plants in 1864 showed that hybrid sterility in

Suggested reading

Summary

  Contemporary writing Anon., The English matron: A practical manual for young wives, (London, 1846). Anon., The English gentlewoman: A practical manual for young ladies on their entrance to society, (Third edition, London, 1846). Becker, L. E.…

Matches: 10 hits

  • writing Anon.,  The English matronA practical manual for young wives , (London, …
  • Huxley, T. H.,  Lectures to working men - Lecture 1: On Darwin's work, &#039;Origin of
  • and development ,  (London, 1861).  Lubbock, E., &#039; The ancient shell-mounds of
  • …   Modern commentary Barker, H. &amp; Chalus, E. (eds.),  Women&#039;s history, …
  • participation in the BAASin Clifford, D., Wadge, E., Warwick, A., &amp; Willis, M. (eds.),  …
  • scientific thinking  (London, 2006). Browne, JDarwins Origin of species : A b
  • middle class , 1780-1850 (London, 2002). Desmond, A.,. &#039;Redefining the X axis: …
  • 1820 - 1885 , (Georgia, 2007). Harvey, J., ‘‘Darwins angels’: The women correspondents of
  • Religion and Gender,  (Cambridge, 1999). Richards, E., ‘ Redrawing the boundaries: …
  • to the present,  (California, 2008). Schteir, A. B.,  Cultivating women, cultivating

Race, Civilization, and Progress

Summary

Darwin's first reflections on human progress were prompted by his experiences in the slave-owning colony of Brazil, and by his encounters with the Yahgan peoples of Tierra del Fuego. Harsh conditions, privation, poor climate, bondage and servitude,…

Matches: 23 hits

  • Letters | Selected Readings Darwin's first reflections on human progress were
  • human progress or cause degeneration. In the &quot;Fuegians&quot;, Darwin thought he had witnessed
  • homeland by Robert FitzRoy several years earlier as part of a missionary enterprise. Darwin was
  • been returned to their native land. After the voyage, Darwin began to question the
  • toward increased complexity and variety, he suggested, was a bi-product of the abundance of life; …
  • After the publication of Origin of Species , many of Darwin's supporters continued to
  • or extermination of other peoples and cultures. When Darwin wrote about the human races and
  • on human and animal behavior accumulated over three decades. Darwin argued forcefully for the unity
  • moral powers. The &quot;grade of civilization&quot;, he wrote, &quot;seems a most important element
  • and beyond. Letters Darwins first observations of the peoples
  • Cambridge, John Stevens Henslow. Letter 204 : Darwin to Henslow, J. S., 11 April 1833
  • Charles wrote to his sister, Emily Catherine Darwin, about witnessing slavery in the Portuguese
  • effect in the following year. Letter 206 : Darwin to Darwin, E. C., 22 May [– 14 July] …
  • shown at elections, has been rising against Slavery.— What a proud thing for England, if she is the
  • be altered; the only alteration I am aware of is forming a much higher estimate of the Negros
  • descent. Letter 4933 : Farrar, F. W. to Darwin, 6 November 1865 &quot;so
  • have remained unaltered for say 5000 yearsis not this a very strong argument for the Polygenist? …
  • questionnaire on expression in the Cape Colony, and received a set of replies from the South African
  • kind in taking such great trouble about expression, which is a subject that interests me to an
  • Letter 4510 : Darwin to Wallace, A. R., 28 [May 1864] &quot;Now for your Man paper, about
  • Primary Charles Darwin, Notebooks, B 18-29; E 95-7 [ available at Darwinonline ] …
  • at archive.org ] Carl Vogt, Lectures on Man (1864) [ available at archive.org ] …
  • theory of natural selection&quot;, Anthropological Review 2 (1864): clviii-clxx [ available at

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 18 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • … , anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied
  • briefly’ ( letter to John Scott, 31 May [1863] ), and in a letter of 23 [June 1863] he wrote
  • am languid &amp; bedeviled … &amp; hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • letter-writing dwindled considerably. The correspondence and Darwins scientific work diminished
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • Evidence as to mans place in nature  both had a direct bearing on Darwins species theory and on
  • fromsome Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] …
  • detailed anatomical similarities between humans and apes, Darwin was full of praise. He especially
  • in expressing any judgment on Species or origin of man’. Darwins concern about the popular
  • Lyells and Huxleys books. Three years earlier Darwin had predicted that Lyells forthcoming
  • had been rapidly accumulating. Lyells argument for a greater human antiquity than was commonly
  • from an ape-like animal, while dating human origins to a time far earlier than that decreed by
  • … ). Although English experts subsequently decided the jaw was a forgery, publications in learned
  • seen how indignant all Owens lies and mean conduct about E. Columbi made me… . The case is come to
  • Copley Medal had been unsuccessful ( see letter from E. A. Darwin to Emma Darwin, 11 November [1863
  • to the Linnean Society in a paper that was read in February 1864. He had already promised Scott that
  • the bookcase and around the head of the sofa ( letter to W. E. Darwin, [25 July 1863], and

2.1 Thomas Woolner bust

Summary

< Back to Introduction Thomas Woolner’s marble bust of Darwin was the first portrayal of him that reflected an important transition in his status in the later 1860s. In the 1840s–1850s Darwin had been esteemed within scientific circles as one among…

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  • to Introduction Thomas Woolners marble bust of Darwin was the first portrayal of him
  • the subversive author of Origin of Species ; but by 1869 Darwin had gained public fame as a
  • are not pleasing’. This enterprise came to nothingwas Darwin wary of authorising the creation and
  • undertaken in November 1868, not for Erasmus but for Charles Darwin himself, and his immediate
  • and awestruck visitors to Down, and apparently where Darwin carried out his duties as a magistrate. …
  • dynastic or social pretension; and Woolners portrayal of Darwin, analogously, falls somewhere