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Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

‘My heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old Shrewsbury friend Henry Johnson on 14 November 1880. Darwin became fully devoted to earthworms in the spring of the year, just after finishing the manuscript of…

Matches: 22 hits

  • heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • Charles Harrison Tindal, sent a cache of letters from two of Darwins grandfathers clerical friends
  • divines to see a pigs body opened is very amusing’, Darwin replied, ‘& that about my
  • find an ordinary mortal who could laugh’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin to Charles and Emma Darwin, 22
  • a grievance to hang an article upon’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [28 January 1880] ). …
  • … , sending one or both to his daughter Henrietta ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 1 February [1880] ). …
  • he will have the last word’, she warned ( letter from H. E. Litchfield, [1 February 1880] ). ‘He
  • the end’, added her husband Richard ( letter from R. B. Litchfield, 1 February 1880 ). Even the
  • Darwinophobia? It is a horrid disease’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 February 1880 ). All
  • I was, also, rarely fit to see anybody’ ( letter to S. H. Haliburton, 13 December 1880 ). …
  • thus one looks to prevent its return’ ( letter from J.-H. Fabre, 18 February 1880 ). Darwin shared
  • aided in any way direct attacks on religion’ ( letter to E. B. Aveling, 13 October 1880 ). Finally
  • biologist of our time’ ( letter from W. D. Roebuck to G. H. Darwin, 25 October 1880 ). The
  • 21 years since the Origin appeared”‘ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 11 [April] 1880 ). While praising
  • been developed through natural selection’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 11 May 1880 ). Worthy
  • prevailing superstitions of this country!’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, [after 26 November 1880] ). …
  • and spent extended periods with Henrietta and Richard Litchfield in London. The children returned

Darwin in letters, 1881: Old friends and new admirers

Summary

In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began writing about all the eminent men he had met. He embarked on this task, which formed an addition to his autobiography, because he had nothing else to do. He had…

Matches: 19 hits

  • In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began
  • a very old man, who probably will not last much longer.’ Darwins biggest fear was not death, but
  • sweetest place on this earth’. From the start of the year, Darwin had his demise on his mind. He
  • provision for the dividing of his wealth after his death. Darwins gloominess was compounded by the
  • and new admirers got in touch, and, for all his fears, Darwin found several scientific topics to
  • Evolution old and new when revising his essay on Erasmus Darwins scientific work, and that Darwin
  • memory in November 1880 and in an abusive letter about Darwin in the St Jamess Gazette on 8
  • in a review of Unconscious memory in Kosmos and sent Darwin a separate letter for
  • Butler wished to boast publicly that his quarrel was with Darwin, agreed. Unsure how to address
  • gone mad on such a small matter’. The following day, Darwin himself wrote to Stephen, admitting that
  • a slap in the face as he would have cause to remember’. Darwin was enormously relieved. ‘Your note
  • wrote such a savage review of Unconscious memory that Darwin feared he had redirected Butlers
  • decided to print500 more, making 2000’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 January 1881 ). Unlike
  • very surprising the whole case is to me’ (letters to W. E. Darwin, 31 January [1881] and 19
  • with you’, a Swedish teacher told him ( letter from C. E. Södling, 14 October 1881 ), while H. M. …
  • little, to the general stock of knowledge’ ( letter to E. W. Bok, 10 May 1881 ). Josef Popper, an
  • in heavenwhen the portrait was finished ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 23 July 1881 ). ‘All my family
  • absurd for one with no pretensions’ (l etter from W. E. Darwin, 13 January [1881 ]), Darwin
  • after expressing their wish to visit Darwin ( letter from E. B. Aveling, 27 September [1881] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 27 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • … ). The death of a Cambridge friend, Albert Way, caused Darwins cousin, William Darwin Fox, to
  • from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to the self-assessment, ‘as for one
  • I feel very old & helpless The year started for Darwin with a weeks visit to
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • Erasmuss house. The event was led by the medium Charles E. Williams, and was attended by George
  • Williams wasa cheat and an imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin
  • he was thus free to perform his antics’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 29 January [1874] ). This did
  • sweetly all the horrid bother of correction’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 21 [March 1874] ). The
  • I have pounded the enemy into a jelly’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 14 April 1874 ). The technical
  • and never mind where it goes’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 16 April 1874 ). The second
  • conciseness & clearness of your thought’ ( letter from G. H. Darwin, 20 April 1874 ). …
  • the spread of various mental and physical disorders (G. H. Darwin 1873b). In July 1874, an anonymous
  • over thescurrilous libelon his son ( letter to G. H. Darwin, [27 July 1874] ).  George, …
  • accusation of [a] lying scoundrel’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 1 August [1874] ). He drafted a brief
  • with Murray on the outcome ( enclosure to letter from G. H. Darwin, 6 [August] 1874 ): …
  • to the Editor & it had been refused’ ( letter from G. H. Darwin, [6 or 7 August 1874] ). When
  • of Hookers and Huxleys representations ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 22 December [1874] ). Huxley
  • offender & give him the cold shoulder’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 23 December 1874 ). He
  • of exchange value, and the second elliptic integral (G. H. Darwin 1875a, 1875b, 1875d, 1875e). …
  • artificial gastric juice  for about a week ( letter from E. E. Klein, 14 May 1874 ). John Burdon
  • try to get it exhibited at a Royal Society of London soirée  (see letter from Anton Dohrn, 6 April
  • nephew, the fine-art specialist Henry Parker ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 17 [March 1874] ). He
  • Julius Victor Carus, and his publisher, Eduard Koch of E. Schweizerbartsche Verlagsbuchhandlung, …
  • could not weary the German public ( letter to H. E. Litchfield,  21 [March 1874] ). …

Origin is 160; Darwin's 1875 letters now online

Summary

To mark the 160th anniversary of the publication of Origin of species, the full transcripts and footnotes of nearly 650 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1875 are published online for the first time. You can read about Darwin's life in 1875…

Matches: 15 hits

  • and footnotes of nearly 650 letters to and from Charles Darwin in 1875 are published online
  • printings before the end of the year. At the same time, Darwin was writing Cross and self
  • Royal Commission that was set up to look into the subject. Darwins second visit of the year to
  • and others at the Brown Institution, London, had assisted Darwin with his experiments on the
  • of animals when performing a painful experiment. Huxley told Darwin about Kleins testimony: ‘ I
  • to any law, which should send him to the treadmill. ’ Darwin replied to Huxley: ‘ I am astounded
  • … ( Letter to RFCooke, 29 June [1875] ) Darwin wrote this to his publisher in June
  • Letter to JDHooker, 18 August [1875] ) Darwin also completed second editions of
  • if  the experiment made this possible  ( Letter to HELitchfield, 4 January [1875] ) …
  • Frances Power Cobbe, a journalist and an acquaintance of Darwins, raised a petition and managed to
  • the matter was referred to a Royal Commission, before which Darwin gave evidence. An appendix on the
  • to be poor. John Lubbock, another local landowner and Darwins friend, attempted to make peace, …
  • energy as yours almost always succeeds  ( Letter to GHDarwin, 13 October [1875] ) …
  • was an impassable barrier between animals and humans. Darwins son Francis, who was working as his
  • The year was saddened by the death of several of Darwins correspondents, including one of his

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 9 hits

  • Charles Darwins daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and
  • 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University
  • excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwins letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwins own discussion of religious belief in
  • of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his
  • one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and
  • Methodism. In June 1871 Henrietta met Richard Buckley Litchfield, a barrister and lecturer in
  • period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the
  • 8 Thomas Henry Huxley . 9 Richard Buckley Litchfield . 10 Bradshaws

Referencing women’s work

Summary

Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, but whether and how they were acknowledged in print involved complex considerations of social standing, professional standing, and personal preference.…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, …
  • set of selected letters is followed by letters relating to Darwin's 1881 publication
  • throughout Variation . Letter 2395 - Darwin to Holland, Miss, [April 1860] …
  • anonymised and masculinised. Letter 3316 - Darwin to Nevill, D. F., [12 November
  • Nevill is referenced by name for herkindnessin Darwins Fertilisation of Orchids . …
  • critic. Letter 4370 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [April - May 1865] Darwin
  • asfriends in Surrey”. Letter 4794 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [25 March 1865] …
  • B”. Letter 7060 - Wedgwood, F. J. to Darwin, [1867 - 72] Darwins
  • in the final publication. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [9 June 1867 - …
  • in Expression . Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., [30 January 1868
  • Mary Barton. Letter 8321 - Darwin to Litchfield, H. E., [13 May 1872] …
  • rely”. Letter 8427 - Darwin to Litchfield H. E., [25 July 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R. to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] Amy Ruck reports the
  • Letter 8193 - Ruck, A. R. to Darwin, H., [1 February 1872] Amy Ruck sends a
  • Letter 11221 - Darwin to Darwin, H., [1 November 1877] Darwin asks his sons, …
  • … . Letter 12745 - Darwin to Wedgwood, K. E. S., [8 October 1880] Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 28 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little
  • of   On the origin of   species , intended to be Darwins last, and of  Expression of the
  • books brought a strong if deceptive sense of a job now done: Darwin intended, he declared to Alfred
  • …  27 July [1872] ). By the end of the year Darwin was immersed in two of the studies that
  • of books and papers, and the latter formed the subject of Darwins last bookThe formation of   …
  • worms , published in the year before his deathDespite Darwins declared intention to take up new
  • begun many years before. In his private life also, Darwin was in a nostalgic frame of mind, …
  • The last word on Origin The year opened with Darwin, helped by his eldest son William, …
  • on 30 January , shortly after correcting the proofs, and Darwins concern for the consolidation of
  • and sixth editions were costly to incorporate, and despite Darwins best efforts, set the final
  • closely involved in every stage of publication of his books, Darwin was keen to ensure that this
  • to bring out the new edition in the United States, Darwin arranged with Murray to have it
  • had to be resetThe investment in stereotype reinforced Darwins intention to make no further
  • A worsening breach The criticisms against which Darwin had taken the greatest trouble to
  • objections to the theory of natural selection’, Darwin refuted point by point assertions published
  • Although Mivart was among those who wrote in January to wish Darwin a happy new year, before the
  • critical and anonymously published review of  Descent . Darwins supporters had rallied to his
  • The republication of Wrights paper had been arranged by Darwin himself (see  Correspondence  vol. …
  • so bigotted a person as I am made to appear’, complained Darwin ( letter to St GJMivart, 5
  • selection is somewhat under a cloud’, he wrote to JETaylor on 13 January , and he complained
  • the theories of natural and sexual selection to bees (HMüller 1872), and with his reply Darwin
  • for myself it is dreadful doing nothing’ ( letter to THHuxley, 22 October [1872] ). He was far
  • origins of music provided by her husband, Richard Buckley Litchfield ( letter to HELitchfield, …
  • … 'I know that I am half-killed myself’ ( letter to HELitchfield, 25 July 1872 ). A
  • a week later ( enclosure to letter from John Lubbock to WEGladstone, 20 June 1872 ).  Darwin
  • Charlton Bastians recent book on the origin of life (HCBastian 1872; Wallace 1872d) left him
  • pleasant letters & never answer them’ ( letter to THHuxley, 22 October [1872] ). But not
  • than usual. One such old friend was Sarah Haliburton, née Owen, to whose sister, Fanny, Darwin had

Darwin's bad days

Summary

Despite being a prolific worker who had many successes with his scientific theorising and experimenting, even Darwin had some bad days. These times when nothing appeared to be going right are well illustrated by the following quotations from his letters:

Matches: 1 hits

  • … with his scientific theorising and experimenting, even Darwin had some bad days. These times when …

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 24 hits

  • The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his
  • book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwins time for the rest of the year was devoted
  • way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from
  • offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be
  • a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate centred on Darwins evolutionary account of the
  • taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases
  • year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression. Darwin continued to investigate the
  • also brought a significant milestone for the family, as Darwins eldest daughter Henrietta was
  • during several past years, has been a great amusement’. Darwin had been working fairly continuously
  • work on species theory in the late 1830s. In recent years, Darwin had collected a wealth of material
  • to human evolution was comparatively small, reflecting Darwins aim of  showing kinship with animals
  • he istorn to piecesby people wanting copies’, Darwin wrote to his son Francis on 28 February
  • letter from J. D. Hooker, 26 March 1871 ). The profits for Darwin were considerable. After
  • man.’ Promoting the book As usual, Darwin did his best to obtain a wide and favourable
  • … (see Correspondence vol. 19Appendix IV). Four of Darwins five sons received a copy, and his
  • her liking, ‘to keep in memory of the book’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 20 March 1871 ). …
  • … . ancestor lived between tide-marks!’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 20 February 1871 ). Asa Gray
  • a high aesthetic appreciation of beauty ( letter from E. J. Pfeiffer, [before 26 April 1871] ). …
  • most deep and tender religious feeling’ ( letter from F. E. Abbot, 20 August 1871 ). The Anglican
  • Abraham Dee Bartlett, Albert Günther, George Busk, T. H. Huxley, Osbert Salvin, and William Henry
  • and misquoting of both Darwin and Catholic theology (T. H. Huxley 1871). Huxley judged Mivart to be
  • Popery and fear for his soul’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley and H. A. Huxley, 20 September 1871 ). …
  • who wasas good as twice refined gold’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 September [1871] ). …
  • up to the last with quinine & sherry’ ( letter from H. E. Litchfield to Charles and Emma Darwin

Darwin's in letters, 1873: Animal or vegetable?

Summary

Having laboured for nearly five years on human evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost exclusively to his beloved plants. He resumed work on the digestive powers of sundews and Venus fly traps, and…

Matches: 27 hits

  • evolution, sexual selection, and the expression of emotions, Darwin was able to devote 1873 almost
  • … (1875) and  Cross and self fertilisation  (1876). Darwins son Francis became increasingly
  • career to become his fathers scientific secretary. Darwin had always relied on assistance from
  • Franciss decision. A large portion of the letters Darwin received in 1873 were in response
  • the previous year. As was typical, readers wrote to Darwin personally to offer suggestions, …
  • some of which were incorporated in a later edition. Darwin also contributed to discussions in the
  • Francis Galtons work on inherited talent, which prompted Darwin to reflect on the traits and
  • Station at Naples. Plants that eat and feel? Darwin had resumed experiments on the
  • 12 January [1873] ).  Drosera  was the main focus of Darwins study of insectivorous plants, a
  • and alkaloids, and even electrical stimulation. On sending Darwin a specimen of the carnivorous  …
  • … ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 12 January 1873 ). Darwin found that the glandular hairs on the
  • to bend inward, so that the plant closed like a fist. Darwin was fascinated by this transmission of
  • plants , p. 63). The plants secreted a viscid fluid, which Darwin suspected attracted insects by
  • … ., p. 17). Through a series of painstaking experiments, Darwin determined that the secretions
  • botanist Mary Treat, who performed experiments suggested by Darwin on the North American species  …
  • … . He began to perform experiments modelled on those of Darwin, feeding the plant egg and raw meat, …
  • guide to animal experimentation that Klein had co-authored. Darwin contacted two of the  Handbook
  • flower would become modified & correlated” ( letter to T. H. Farrer, 14 August 1873 ). …
  • assistance from his son Francis. While visiting his fiancée, Amy Ruck, in Wales, Francis observed
  • and if so more places will be created” ( letter to E. A. Darwin, 20 September 1873 ). Erasmus, who
  • family being fit for continuous work” ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 25 September [1873] ).  Shortly
  • throat like a bulldog” ( letter from L. M. Forster to H. E. Litchfield, 20 February 1873 ). The
  • it would offend his father ( enclosure to letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 December 1873 ).  In
  • we should feel it a privilege to offer” ( letter from E. F. Lubbock, [before 7 April 1873] ). …
  • to us to the last day of our lives” ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 23 April 1873 ). Huxley was
  • been without energy & without hope” ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 24 April 1873 ). He accepted
  • to starve sweat & purge it away” ( letter from G. H. Darwin, [1 October 1873] ). He also

Animals, ethics, and the progress of science

Summary

Darwin’s view on the kinship between humans and animals had important ethical implications. In Descent, he argued that some animals exhibited moral behaviour and had evolved mental powers analogous to conscience. He gave examples of cooperation, even…

Matches: 24 hits

  • Darwins view on the kinship between humans and animals had important ethical
  • a live worm on a hook (‘Recollections’, pp. 358, 388). Darwins concern for animals aligned with
  • and an integral part of medical and veterinary training. Darwin was clearly disturbed by the
  • to E. R. Lankester, 22 March [1871] ). In Descent , Darwin described an animal enduring a
  • to the last hour of his life’ ( Descent 1: 40). Darwins closest encounter with
  • on rabbits. The investigation was partly aimed at testing Darwinshypothesis of pangenesis’, which
  • of different breeds together. Galton reported regularly to Darwin on the results (all negative). He
  • Society, calling into question the theory of pangenesis. Darwin was taken aback, and swiftly replied
  • no longer look after the rabbits (many died from the cold), Darwin offered to give the poor
  • more influenced by experiments on animals than on plants’, Darwin conceded. ‘I think a large number
  • … ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 18 July 1875 ). Darwin was concerned that the method be painless, …
  • 1874 ). In the previous sections, we have traced Darwins growing interest in physiology and
  • were analogous to those performed on dogs and other animals. Darwins work on insectivorous plants
  • an acquaintance of the Darwins, and had corresponded with Darwin cordially about his moral theory, …
  • … ( letter to F. B. Cobbe, [14 January 1875] ). Darwins involvement in the vivisection
  • in regard to health &c, I look at as puerile. Darwin saw a need for regulation (licensing
  • with costly equipment, a supply of animals, etc.. Darwin was concerned thatprivate menwould be
  • view I have rejoiced at the present agitation. ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 January [1875] ) …
  • as doomed to death in this country. ( letter To T. H. Huxley, 14 January 1875 ) Legislation
  • the total abolition of the practice. ‘It seems to me’, Darwin remarked to George Romanes, ‘that
  • organised defence. To bring more solidarity to the field, Darwins son Francis, and a number of his
  • … ( letter from T. L. Brunton, 12 February 1882 ). Darwin declined the offer to be honorary
  • had its first meeting on 20 April 1882, the day after Darwins death. While Darwin was
  • freely and repeatedly on plants andloweranimals (e.g., worms), Darwin was now confronted with

Darwin and vivisection

Summary

Darwin played an important role in the controversy over vivisection that broke out in late 1874. Public debate was sparked when the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals brought an unsuccessful prosecution against a French physiologist who…

Matches: 21 hits

  • Darwin played an important role in the controversy over vivisection that broke
  • on live animals in Britain. In December 1874, Darwin was asked to sign a memorial by the
  • draft legislation that would protect animals from suffering. Darwin was sympathetic to the cause, …
  • on Virchow for experimenting on the Trichinae’ (letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 January [1875] ). …
  • physiologists to present their own petition (letter to T. H. Huxley, 14 January 1875 ). In
  • for assistance in preparing a bill for Parliament. Darwin almost never involved himself in
  • recent research on insectivorous plants. Indeed, some of Darwins plant experiments, such as
  • and because it failed to mention anaesthetics. Darwins indebtedness and allegiance to
  • to put an end to any suffering before his eyes’. Darwin was clearly disturbed by the prospect
  • not sleep to-night’ ( Correspondence vol. 19, letter to E. R. Lankester, 22 March [1871] ). In
  • some animals possessed social sympathies akin to conscience. Darwin even described an animal
  • 1: 40).  Vivisection was a sensitive subject within Darwins family. In his letter of 14
  • of a network of reformers and philanthropists that included Darwins brother, Erasmus, and his
  • of course) or I might get one or two’ (letter from Emma Darwin to F. P. Cobbe, 14 January [1875] …
  • who produced a new sketch for a petition (letter from T. H. Huxley, [4 April 1875] ). This was
  • of Lushington and Darwins son-in-law Richard Buckley Litchfield. On 11 April, Darwin learned
  • to Down, however, it was decided to draft a formal bill. Litchfield drew up a sketch that was
  • … ‘we wd do whatever else you think best’ (letter to E. H. Stanley, 15 April 1875 ). After further
  • of the documents contain marginal notes and revisions in Litchfields hand. The changes made to the
  • for each offence. This version also contained notes in Litchfields hand for an alternative title
  • expressed their dismay at this alteration (letter from T. H. Huxley, 19 May 1875 , letter from J. …

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 22 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge