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Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 14 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation
  • markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters
  • of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • of man and his history' The first five months of 1863 contain the bulk of the
  • to mans place in nature  both had a direct bearing on Darwins species theory and on the problem
  • fromsome Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] …
  • … ‘I declare I never in my life read anything grander’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 26 [February 1863] …
  • than  Origin had (see  Correspondence  vol. 8, letter to Charles Lyell, 10 January [1860] ). …
  • origins was further increased by the discovery in March 1863 of the Moulin-Quignon jaw, the first
  • had been unsuccessful ( see letter from E. A. Darwin to Emma Darwin, 11 November [1863] ). The
  • letter to Charles Lyell, 1213 March [1863] ). Emma was a steady help to Darwin, writing
  • shrubs ( see letter from W. D. Fox, 7 September [1863] ). Emma wrote back: ‘This has been a great
  • fared little better, and most letters were dictated to Emma. Darwin only managed one of his
  • letters from him in December were short, and dictated to Emma. By the end of the year, Emma admitted

Darwin’s hothouse and lists of hothouse plants

Summary

Darwin became increasingly involved in botanical experiments in the years after the publication of Origin. The building of a small hothouse - a heated greenhouse - early in 1863  greatly increased the range of plants that he could keep for scientific…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Towards the end of 1862, Darwin resolved to build a small hothouse at Down House, forexperimental
  • experimentation, and the building of the hothouse early in 1863 marked something of a milestone in
  • book (Down House MS) and  Correspondence  vol5, letter to JD. Hooker, 19 April [1855] ). …
  • Though his greenhouse was probably heated to some extent, Darwin found himself on several occasions
  • make observations and even experiments on his behalf. Darwins decision to build a hothouse
  • its sensitivity to touch (see  Correspondence  vol10, letter to JD. Hooker, 12 [December
  • his employers hothouses over the previous two years. In a letter of 24 December [1862] ( …
  • Encyclopedia of gardening  (Loudon 1835), a copy of which Darwin signed in 1841 (see the copy in
  • mid-February (see letters to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] and 15 February [1863] ). It was
  • he had had, he wouldprobably have made a mess of it’ (letter to GH. Turnbull, [16? February
  • addingI shall keep to curious & experimental plants’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 13 January
  • of Westerham, with whom he had dealt over many years. In his letter to Hooker, Darwin mentioned that
  • of the plants you want before going to Nurserymen’ (letter from JD. Hooker, [15 January 1863] ) …
  • I shall avoid[,] of course I must not have from Kew’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 30 January [1863] ) …
  • a school-boy’ (letter to JDHooker, 15 February [1863] ). On 20 February, the plants from Kew
  • of moss, peat, and charcoal (see the letter from Henrietta Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, …

Dining at Down House

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Dining, Digestion, and Darwin's Domestic Life While Darwin is best remembered for his scientific accomplishments, he greatly valued and was strongly influenced by his domestic life. Darwin's…

Matches: 12 hits

  • … Questions | Experiment Dining, Digestion, and Darwin's Domestic Life …
  • … and they partook in his scientific endeavours. One of Darwin's defining characteristics …
  • … provides into the bright and engaging personalities of the Darwin children and of family life in the …
  • … and Conclusion”). Letters Letter Packet: Dining at Down House …
  • … ill health began on his Beagle voyage. In this letter (written amidst the excitement of South …
  • … difficulties of traveling on horseback while ill. Letter 465 —Emma Wedgwood (Emma Darwin …
  • … making himself agreeable” for her sake. Letter 3626 —Emma Darwin to T. G. Appleton, 28 …
  • … to thank Appleton for gifts sent from America. Letter 3597 —Darwin to Joseph Dalton …
  • … on the difficulties of finding a suitable cook. Emma Darwin to Henrietta Darwin, [4 …
  • … among other things, for Darwin’s complaints. Emma Darwin to Henrietta Darwin, [14 April …
  • … to Henrietta Darwin, [5 September 1868] In this chatty letter to her daughter Henrietta, who …
  • … typical nineteenth-century luncheon fare. Letter 8296 —Darwin to Francis Galton, 21 …

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Observers Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August
  • silkworm breeds, or peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to
  • to artificially fertilise plants in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to
  • be made on seeds of Pulmonaria officinalis . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to
  • Expression from her home in South Africa. Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L
  • Expression during a trip to Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., …
  • expression of emotion in her pet dog and birds. Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. …
  • her observations on the expression of emotion in dogs with Emma Darwin. Letter 8676
  • Letter 4242 - Hildebrand, F. H. G. to Darwin, [16 July 1863] Hildebrand writes to
  • 1868] Darwins nephew, Edmund, writes to Emma Darwins sister, Sarah, with observations of
  • Darwins nephews, Edmund and Charles, write to Emma Darwins sister, Sarah, with observations of
  • Letter 4235 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [8 July 1863] Lydia Becker sends Darwin a
  • Wedgwood, S. E. & J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] Emmas sister, Sarah, passes on
  • Letter 4139  - Darwin, W. E. to Darwin, [4 May 1863] William sends the results of a
  • Letter 4258 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [31 July 1863] Lydia Becker details her
  • E. to Darwin, W. E., [January 23rd 1887]: Emma Darwin tells her eldest son, William, …
  • 4233  - Tegetmeier, W. B. to Darwin, [29 June - 7 July 1863] Tegetmeier updates Darwin
  • E. to Darwin, W. E. , (March, 1862 - DAR 219.1:49) Emma Darwin updates her son, William, …
  • 3896 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H, [before 25 February 1863] Darwin offers the results of
  • Letter 4010 - Huxley, T. H. to Darwin, [25 February 1863] Huxley praises Henriettas
  • is a great critic”, thought the article worth reprinting, Emma was less convinced. Letter

'An Appeal' against animal cruelty

Summary

The four-page pamphlet transcribed below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [29 September 1863]). The pamphlet, which protested against the cruelty of steel vermin…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … below and entitled 'An Appeal', was composed jointly by Emma and Charles Darwin (see …
  • 1863, pp. 821–2, under the title `Vermin and traps' ( Letter no. 4282). The wording of the …
  • … 1872, pp. 99–100, 1 April 1874, p. 56). Charles and Emma distributed the 'Appeal' …
  • … more success with the campaign than she expected (see the letter from Emma Darwin to William Erasmus …

The Lyell–Lubbock dispute

Summary

In May 1865 a dispute arose between John Lubbock and Charles Lyell when Lubbock, in his book Prehistoric times, accused Lyell of plagiarism. The dispute caused great dismay among many of their mutual scientific friends, some of whom took immediate action…

Matches: 21 hits

  • of whom took immediate action to mediate a solution. Charles Darwin had close ties with both men and
  • …  In the concluding paragraphs of Origin , Darwin had predicted that arevolution in natural
  • species such as the mammoth ( Correspondence vol. 8, letter to Charles Lyell, 4 May [1860] and n. …
  • Thomas Henry Huxley, Busk, and several other supporters of Darwin in editing the Natural History
  • … ‘Textual changes made to C. Lyell 1863c’). On 6 February 1863, Antiquity of man (C. Lyell 1863a) …
  • Busk, Prestwich, and Galton.   In February 1863, Lubbock received a letter from Lyell, …
  • Bath in 1864 (C. Lyell 1864). 3  By November 1863 a third edition of Antiquity of
  • of several aspects of the book. Throughout the first half of 1863, Darwin discussed the book in
  • spoke out publicly about any controversial aspect.  Darwins chief complaint about the book
  • he thought aboutthe derivation of Species’. 8 Darwin continued to feel aggrieved about
  • transmutation; he also wrote to Lyell telling him about the letter to the Athenæum . 9
  • accusation, which had just appeared in the Athenæum . Darwin had not advised Falconer personally, …
  • 1863b, p. 213).  In May 1864, Lubbock received a letter from Falconer, who reiterated his
  • and went on to say that he intended to make a copy of his letter to show to friends. 18 In
  • Darwin had discussed the matter in person with Lubbock, and Emma Darwin wrote to Henrietta Emma
  • wrote to Darwin to ask what he thought of the affair ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [2 June 1865] ). …
  • note on p. 11.  Unlike the earlier controversies of 1863 where the disputants had quarrelled
  • 13). The third edition had originally appeared in November 1863. In spite of Lyells 1865 revisions, …
  • … (Original version of the last section, printed in November 1863) In conclusion, I wish it to
  • evidence appealed to.  53 Harley Street: November 1863  Preface, C. Lyell 1863c, pp. …
  • Hooker, [31 May 1865] and n. 1. 23. Letter from Emma Darwin to Henrietta Emma Darwin, …

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 20 hits

  • Re: DesignAdaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and othersby Craig
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring
  • Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the dress of a modern day
  • Louis Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • his University) and is much less his own man. A letter from England catches his attention
  • 11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind letter Dr A. Gray has sent me in answer to my
  • be of any the least use to you? If so I would copy itHis letter does strike me as most uncommonly
  • on the geographical distribution of the US plants; and if my letter caused you to do this some year
  • a brace of letters 25   I send enclosed [a letter for you from Asa Gray], received
  • might like to see it; please be sure [to] return it. If your letter is Botanical and has nothing
  • Atlantic. HOOKER:   28   Thanks for your letter and its enclosure from A. Gray which
  • Thank God he will never suffer more in this world. Poor Emma behaved nobly and how she stood it all
  • DARWINMy wifes remark on reading this, was EMMA: Why, you know nothing about Logic. …
  • of your darling. BOOKS BY THE LATE CHARLES DARWIN: 1863-1865 In which Drwin struggles
  • 1860 98 A GRAY TO ALPHONSE DE CANDOLLE, 16 FEB 1863 99  C DARWIN TO LYELL, …
  • 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150 C DARWIN TO J. D. …

Evolution: Selected Letters of Charles Darwin 1860-1870

Summary

This selection of Charles Darwin’s letters includes correspondence with his friends and scientific colleagues around the world; letters by the critics who tried to stamp out his ideas, and by admirers who helped them to spread. It takes up the story of…

Matches: 13 hits

  • This selection of Charles Darwins letters includes correspondence with his friends and scientific
  • admirers who helped them to spread. It takes up the story of Darwins life in 1860, in the immediate
  • of publication of Descent of Man in 1871. In this period Darwin became a public figure, and the
  • increased accordingly. Letters conveyed public reaction to Darwin, as people who were often complete
  • worked up, or their religious doubts and concerns for Darwins own soul. Darwin himself used letters
  • world a questionnaire on the expression of the emotions. Darwin also continued to confide in his
  • yet been pointed out to me. No doubt many will be. Darwin to Huxley, 1860. …
  • when I know you have been miserably uncomfortable. Emma to Charles Darwin, 1861. …
  • gravitating towards your doctrinesHuxley to Darwin, 1862. I cannot bear
  • what you think about the derivation of SpeciesDarwin to Charles Lyell, 1863. …
  • fairly settled & succeeding in India. John Scott to Darwin, 1864. I
  • was quite out of balance once during our voyageDarwin to Hooker (on hearing of Robert
  • that the necks of your horses are badly galledDarwin to a local landowner, 1866. …

Darwin's health

Summary

On 28 March 1849, ten years before Origin was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker from Great Malvern in Worcestershire, where Dr James Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to…

Matches: 16 hits

  • March 1849, ten years before  Origin  was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker
  • Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to
  • I was rapidly going the way of all fleshSee the letter At various periods in his
  • fatigue, trembling, faintness, and dizziness. In 1849, Darwins symptoms became so severe that he
  • for three months while he took Dr Gullys water cure. In Darwins letter to Hooker, he described Dr
  • certain that the Water Cure is no quackery.—  See the letter After returning from
  • as my retching is apt to be extremely loud.—  See the letter Besides experimenting
  • the vomiting wonderfully & I am gaining vigour .’ (letter to JDHooker, 13 April [1864] ) …
  • these grounds (see, for example, Correspondence vol. 2, letter to J. S. Henslow, 14 October
  • 1849 ( Correspondence vol. 4). Throughout the winter of 1863 and spring of 1864, he was sick
  • 38, 47, 64). Fainting androckinghad been recorded in Emma Darwins diary (DAR 242) on several
  • sensationshas been found. On Darwins reliance on Emma Darwins companionship and care see, for
  • Hooker, 1 June [1865] and 27 [or 28 September 1865] . Emma or another member of the household
  • pp. 31-2, 47, 98. In his letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 March [1863] ( Correspondence vol. 11), …
  • alive’. See also Correspondence vol. 12, letter from Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, 17 March
  • Wells, under James Smith Ayerst, in September and October 1863 (see Correspondence vol. 11, …

Darwin as mentor

Summary

Darwin provided advice, encouragement and praise to his fellow scientific 'labourers' of both sexes. Selected letters Letter 2234 - Darwin to Unidentified, [5 March 1858] Darwin advises that Professor C. P. Smyth’s observations are not…

Matches: 14 hits

  • Darwin provided advice, encouragement and praise to his fellow scientific …
  • … of both sexes. Selected letters Letter 2234 - Darwin to Unidentified, [5 …
  • … sweeping conclusions on insufficient grounds. Letter 3934 - Darwin to Scott, J., [21 …
  • … how to make the material worthy of publication. Letter 4185 - Darwin to Scott, J., [25 …
  • … indefatigable worker you are!”. Letter 7605 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E., [20 March …
  • … book’s “lucid vigorous style”. In consultation with Emma, Darwin offers Henrietta “some little …
  • … how he made so many observations without aid. Letter 8146 - Darwin to Treat, M., [5 …
  • … “in some well-known scientific journal”. Letter 8171 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L., [21 …
  • … that Lucy is worth her weight in gold. Letter 9005b - Darwin to Treat, M., [12 …
  • … flies until he had repeated the experiment. Letter 9580 - Darwin to Darwin, G. H. D., …
  • … should not yet be submitted to the publisher. Letter 9613 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., …
  • … and thinks that it ought to be published. Letter 10523 - Darwin to Treat, M., [1 June …
  • … in the pursuit of her “admirable work”. Letter 11096 - Darwin to Romanes, G. J., [9 …
  • … her manuscript to Nature for publication. Letter 13414 - Darwin to Harrison, L., …

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 25 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. Darwins transmutation theory continued to
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of
  • in August. There was also a serious dispute between two of Darwins friends, John Lubbock and
  • The death of Hugh Falconer Darwins first letter to Hooker of 1865 suggests that the family
  • having all the Boys at home: they make the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] …
  • had failed to include among the grounds of the award ( see letter from Hugh Falconer to Erasmus
  • his letters to Darwin, and Darwin responded warmly: ‘Your letter is by far the grandest eulogium
  • may well rest content that I have not laboured in vain’ ( letter to Hugh Falconer, 6 January [1865] …
  • always a most kind friend to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] …
  • for our griefs & pains: these alone are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865
  • gas.— Sic transit gloria mundi, with a vengeance’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] ). …
  • added, ‘I know it is folly & nonsense to try anyone’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] …
  • ineffective, and Darwin had given it up by early July ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865] …
  • of anything, & that almost exclusively bread & meat’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 15 August [1865] …
  • Scott had evidently started his crossing experiments in 1863 (see Correspondence  vol. 11, …
  • vol. 11, letter from J. D. Hooker, 10 June 1863 ). However, probably the most enthusiastic
  • that Lyell in his  Antiquity of man , published in 1863, had made unacknowledged use of Lubbocks
  • attending school, and spent some time travelling in Europe (Emma Darwins diary (DAR 242),  Emma
  • people werent so foolish’;. In November, Darwin and Emma visited Erasmus in London ( …
  • frequently, and Hooker also came for a short stay in March (Emma Darwins diary, DAR 242). A

Darwin in letters, 1882: Nothing too great or too small

Summary

In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous October, and for the first time in decades he was not working on another book. He remained active in botanical research, however. Building on his recent studies in plant…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous
  • for scientific colleagues or their widows facing hardship. Darwin had suffered from poor health
  • … ‘I feel a very old man, & my course is nearly run’ ( letter to Lawson Tait, 13 February 1882 ) …
  • of his scientific friends quickly organised a campaign for Darwin to have greater public recognition
  • Botanical observation and experiment had long been Darwins greatest scientific pleasure. The year
  • fertility of crosses between differently styled plants ( letter from Fritz Müller, 1 January 1882
  • working at the effects of Carbonate of Ammonia on roots,’ Darwin wrote, ‘the chief result being that
  • for some hours in a weak solution of C. of Ammonia’. Darwins interest in root response and the
  • London on 6 and 16 March, respectively. In January, Darwin corresponded with George John
  • François Marie Glaziou (see Correspondence vol. 28, letter from Arthur de Souza Corrêa, 20
  • quite untirable & I am glad to shirk any extra labour’ ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 6 January
  • probably intending to test its effects on chlorophyll ( letter to Joseph Fayrer, 30 March 1882 ). …
  • we know about the life of any one plant or animal!’ ( letter to Henry Groves, 3 April 1882 ). He
  • of seeing the flowers & experimentising on them’ ( letter to J. E. Todd, 10 April 1882 ). …
  • and was no longer able to take his daily strolls (Henrietta Emma Litchfield, ‘Charles Darwins death
  • E. Litchfield to G. H. Darwin, 17 March 1882 (DAR 245: 319)) Emma wrote ten days later: ‘You will
  • been a good deal plagued with dull aching in the chest’ (Emma Darwin to G. H. Darwin, [ c . 28
  • benefit & he escaped pain entirely yesterday’ (letter from Emma Darwin to G. H. Darwin, 6 April
  • wrote to George, who had visited Down on 11 April (Emma Darwins diary (DAR 242)). ‘Father was taken
  • H. Darwin, [19 April 1882] (DAR 245: 320)). It was left to Emma to convey the sorrowful news to his
  • which I hope were never very violent’ ( letter from Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, [20 April 1882
  • have possessed & have been able to be to him’ (letter from Emma Darwin to Leonard Darwin, [21? …
  • … ( letter from Aleksander Jelski, [186082] ). In 1863, the final blow was dealt to Darwins
  • a fallen enemy!’ ( letter to T. F. Jamieson, 24 January [1863] ). From 1863 to 1865, Darwin

George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans)

Summary

George Eliot was the pen name of celebrated Victorian novelist Mary Ann Evans (1819-1880). She was born on the outskirts of Nuneaton in Warwickshire and was educated at boarding schools from the age of five until she was 16. Her education ended when she…

Matches: 3 hits

  • novels, under her pen name, achieved great acclaim. Darwin and his family were keen readers
  • afternoons, when they received visitors (23 March 1873; Emma described his visit in a letter to
  • was positive, also encouraging him to call again and bring Emma. In fact, Emma and her younger

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 16 hits

  • and colonial authorities. In the nineteenth-century, letter writing was one of the most important
  • when strong institutional structures were largely absent. Darwin had a small circle of scientific
  • in times of uncertainty, controversy, or personal loss. Letter writing was not only a means of
  • section contains two sets of letters. The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. …
  • and he is curious about Hookers thoughts. Letter 729Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., …
  • to Hookerit is like confessing a murder”. Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D. …
  • of wide-ranging species to wide-ranging genera. Darwin and Gray Letter 1674
  • and asks him to append the ranges of the species. Letter 1685Gray, Asa to Darwin, C. …
  • and relationships of alpine flora in the USA. Letter 2125Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, …
  • and their approach to information exchange. Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D
  • first describers name to specific name. Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., …
  • J. D. Hooker to take Scott on at Kew. Darwin notes that Emma begs him not to employ him at Down. He
  • Letter 4170Becker, Lydia to Darwin, C. R., 18 May 1863 This is a very formal letter
  • Letter 4258Becker, Lydia to Darwin, C. R., 31 July [1863] Becker has found seeds produced
  • Letter 4260aDarwin, C. R. to Becker, L. E., 2 Aug [1863] Darwin thanks Lydia Becker for
  • Letter 1176Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, Emma, [201 May 1848] Darwin writes to his wife Emma. …

Darwin's notes for his physician, 1865

Summary

On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London publisher who had studied medicine in London and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863 Chapman started to treat…

Matches: 12 hits

  • On 20 May 1865, Emma Darwin recorded in her diary that John Chapman, a prominent London
  • and Paris in the early 1840s, visited Down to consult with Darwin about his ill health. In 1863
  • Chapman wasnt the first medical practitioner Darwin contacted around this timeIn 1863, Darwin
  • however, his health grew worse.  In hisJournal’, Darwin wrote that he fell ill again on 22 April
  • more attacks of vomiting and seeking another opinion, Darwin wrote to ChapmanOn the day that
  • adult life (the section, ‘I feel nearlyfood’, is in Emma Darwins hand). Darwin began the
  • week of July, he had evidently given up the treatment (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to J. …
  • goutby Henry Holland in 1849 ( Correspondence vol. 4, letter to W. D. Fox, 6 February [1849]). …
  • joints (see, for example, Holland 1855, p. 233, and Garrod 1863, pp. 263-4). The diagnosis of
  • by William Brinton, William Jenner, and George Busk (see letter to J. D. Hooker, [7 January 1865], …
  • acid solutions to aid digestion ( Correspondence vol. 11, Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, 8 December
  • with dietary restrictions (see Correspondence vol. 12, letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 April [1864], …

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 21 hits

  • On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July
  • … … of having grown older’. This portrait, the first of Darwin with his now famous beard, had been
  • 52 hours without vomiting!! In the same month, Darwin began to consult William Jenner, …
  • prescribed a variety of antacids and purgatives, and limited Darwins fluid intake; this treatment
  • the dimorphic aquatic cut-grass  Leersia . In May, Darwin finished his paper on  Lythrum
  • he had set aside the previous summer. In October, Darwin let his friends know that on his
  • and he received more letters of advice from Jenner. In a letter of 15 December [1864] to the
  • As Darwin explained to his cousin William Darwin Fox in a letter of 30 November [1864] , ‘the
  • leaf, and aerial roots. When his health deteriorated in 1863, he found that he could still continue
  • gradation by which  leaves  produce tendrils’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [8 February 1864] ). …
  • fearfully for it is a leaf climber & therefore sacred’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 June [1864] …
  • matters which routinists regard in the light of axioms’ ( letter from Daniel Oliver, [17 March 1864
  • long series of changes . . .’ When he told Asa Gray in a letter of 29 October [1864] that he was
  • …  paper was published, Darwin remarked to Hooker in a letter of 26 November [1864] that nothing
  • of the two species with the common oxlip. In a letter of 22 October [1864] , Darwin triumphantly
  • household news, were sometimes written by Darwins wife, Emma, or by Henrietta. Darwins own replies
  • thesplendid case of Dimorphismin  Menyanthes  ( letter from Emma and Charles Darwin to W. E. …
  • scientific debate. He had begun taking the journal in April 1863 and was an enthusiastic subscriber. …
  • and their predecessors had continued to grow following the 1863 publication of Huxleys  Evidence
  • failure to win the award in the two preceding years. An 1863 letter from the president of the Royal
  • he saw few people outside the family and, according to Emma Darwins diary and his ownJournal’, …

Science: A Man’s World?

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth-century women participated in the world of science, be it as experimenters, observers, editors, critics, producers, or consumers. Despite this, much of the…

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  • Discussion Questions | Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth
  • Letters Darwins Notes On Marriage [April - July 1838] In these notes, …
  • theories, & accumulating facts in silence & solitude