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Darwin in letters, 1860: Answering critics

Summary

On 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s Origin of species, printing off another 3000 copies to satisfy the demands of an audience that surprised both the publisher and the author. It wasn't long, however, before ‘the…

Matches: 21 hits

  • 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwins  Origin of species , printing off
  • the book was on sale even in railway stations ( letter to Charles Lyell, 14 January [1860] ). By
  • But it was the opinion of scientific men that was Darwins main concern. He eagerly scrutinised each
  • did not at all concern his main argument ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 January [1860] ). …
  • principles of scientific investigation.—’ ( letter to J. S. Henslow, 8 May [1860] ). Above
  • were inexplicable by the theory of creation. Asa Grays statement in his March review that natural
  • it comes in time to be admitted as real.’ ( letter to C. J. F. Bunbury, 9 February [1860] ). This
  • fellow Henry Fawcett in the December issue of  Macmillans Magazine . Fawcett asserted that Darwin
  • current knowledge could not illuminate thismystery’. Charles Lyell worried, among other things, …
  • did not necessarily lead to progression ( letter to Charles Lyell, 18 [and 19 February 1860] ). To
  • of reasoning about global change. Darwin also knew that Lyell was a powerful potential ally. Indeed, …
  • plant species and varieties than from animal breeding. With Lyell also questioning how interbreeding
  • considered it more a failure than a success ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 February [1860] ). …
  • two physiologists, and five botanists ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 March [1860] ). Others, like
  • is in same predicament with other animals’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 10 January [1860] )— he and
  • … ‘master of the field after 4 hours battle’ (letter from J. D. Hooker, 2 July 1860). Other
  • of the scientifically literate clergymen Baden Powell and Charles Kingsley attested. Moreover, …
  • …  rather than against Darwins book per se . Prodded by Henslows defence of the integrity of
  • were already proved) to his own views.—’ ( letter from J. S. Henslow to J. D. Hooker, 10 May 1860
  • … (like Lyell) to retract their support altogether (letters to Charles Lyell, 1 June [1860] and
  • different opposers view the subject’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 15 February [1860] ); later he

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … Bond, Frederick (2) Boner, Charles (5) …
  • … Edward (1) Bradlaugh, Charles (2) …
  • … Brayley, E. W. (1) Breese, Charles (1) …
  • … Samuel (b) (14) Buxton, Charles (2) …
  • … Chapman, John (4) Charles, R. F. (2) …
  • … Crawfurd, John (3) Crawley, Charles (2) …
  • … Virginius (3) Dallas, Charles (1) …
  • … Dixie, Florence (3) Dixon, Charles (1) …
  • … Symington (1) Griffin, Charles (1) …
  • … Lydekker, R. (1) Lyell, Charles (277) …

Race, Civilization, and Progress

Summary

Darwin's first reflections on human progress were prompted by his experiences in the slave-owning colony of Brazil, and by his encounters with the Yahgan peoples of Tierra del Fuego. Harsh conditions, privation, poor climate, bondage and servitude,…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … Letters | Selected Readings Darwin's first reflections on human progress were …
  • … the publication of Origin of Species , many of Darwin's supporters continued to believe that …
  • … beyond. Letters Darwin’s first observations of the peoples of …
  • … the first sight of Man in his primitive wildness." Charles wrote to his sister, Emily …
  • … native, Christian Gaika. Darwin was impressed by Gaika's knowledge of English and used some of …
  • … , Darwin discussed his views on progress in a letter to Charles Lyell, insisting that there was no …
  • … This remained a point of dispute between many of Darwin’s scientific supporters, including Lyell, …
  • … would be no advance.— " Letter 6728 : from Charles Lyell, 5 May 1869 " …
  • … explained by Natural Selection I rather hail Wallace’s suggestion that there may be a Supreme Will …
  • … for existence between human races with the geologist Charles Lyell, the liberal Anglican clergymen …
  • … exterminated." Letter 3439 : Darwin to Kingsley, Charles, 6 February [1862] …
  • … Selected Readings Primary Charles Darwin, Notebooks, B 18-29; E 95-7 [ …
  • … Secondary Adrian Desmond and James Moore, Darwin's Sacred Cause . London: Allen …

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 18 hits

  • The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle  voyage was one
  • the publication of the  Zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle , for which he described the
  • touching in the concern they show for one anothers sensibilities. Early in 1839 the couple set up
  • theoretical achievement, the most important of Darwins activities during the years 183743 was
  • a result of thinking about the significance of John Goulds and Richard Owens identifications of
  • of Darwins findings had been spread by the publication by J. S. Henslow and Adam Sedgwick of
  • by all the leading geologists of Englandamong them Charles Lyell, Sedgwick, and Buckland (see the
  • of South America”, Darwin continued to defend his and Lyells theory that floating icerather than
  • results of the  Beagle  voyage. With the help of J. S. Henslow, William Whewell, and other
  • by Adam White; infusoria by C. G. Ehrenberg; fungi by M. J. Berkeley; and corals by William Lonsdale
  • were neglected. During the voyage Darwin had expected that J. S. Henslow would describe his
  • the other on the Keeling Island flora. Darwins letters to Henslow show a gradual realisation that
  • knowledge of plant distribution and classification (see Henslow 1837a and 1838; W. J. Hooker and G. …
  • correspondent, both scientifically and personally, was Charles Lyell. The letters Darwin and Lyell
  • had declared himself to be azealous discipleof Lyell, but his theory of coral reef formation, …
  • Their correspondence began in 1836 and from the start Lyell accepted Darwin on equal terms as a
  • material for her  Life, letters and journals of Sir Charles Lyell, Bart.,  Darwin informs her that
  • In 1840 the illness was different. As he wrote to Charles Lyell, [19 February 1840] , “it is now

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 16 hits

  • for building and maintaining such connections. Darwin's networks extended from his family
  • The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. Hooker. The second is between Darwin
  • Hooker Letter 714Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., [13 or 20 Nov 1843] Darwin
  • Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 23 Feb [1844] Darwin begins with a charming
  • flora of the USA. He sends a list of plants from Grays Manual of botany [1848] and asks him to
  • recalled meeting Darwin three years earlier at Hookers. Gray has filled up Darwins paper [see
  • Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] Darwin catches up on personal
  • reform, Darwin opposes appending first describers name to specific name. Letter 1220 — …
  • extract anything valuable from his letters to Darwin and Lyell for Athenæum . He mentioned Darwin
  • Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849 Darwin opens by discussing their
  • lamination of gneiss. Letter 1319Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 6 & 7 Apr 1850
  • Mentors Darwin's close relationship with John Stevens Henslow, the professor of botany
  • Mentors This collection of letters documents Henslows mentoring while Darwin was on the
  • mail to Montevideo. He talks of being a sort of Protégé of Henslows and it is Henslowsbounden
  • of his notes on the specimens. Letter 249Henslow, J. S. to Darwin, C. R., 22 July
  • day with Henslow; much had to be done. His friend, Alexander Charles Wood, has written to Capt. …

Darwin in letters, 1847-1850: Microscopes and barnacles

Summary

Darwin's study of barnacles, begun in 1844, took him eight years to complete. The correspondence reveals how his interest in a species found during the Beagle voyage developed into an investigation of the comparative anatomy of other cirripedes and…

Matches: 18 hits

  • … Species theory In November 1845, Charles Darwin wrote to his friend and confidant Joseph …
  • … Light is shed on the close relationship between Darwin’s systematic descriptive work and the species …
  • … it is evident from his correspondence that Darwin’s two hours at the microscope did not preclude a …
  • … activity. There are, for example, twenty lengthy letters to Charles Lyell from these years and a …
  • … and Daniel Sharpe, demonstrating the extent of Darwin’s continued involvement in contemporary …
  • … the midst of all this activity, Hooker responds to Darwin’s particular queries and sends information …
  • … Geology, and geological controversy Hooker’s letters illuminate the role of the British …
  • … ( see letter to Richard Owen, [26 March 1848] ). Darwin’s chapter plainly calls on his  Beagle …
  • … blocked the valley. Darwin was much shaken by Milne’s evidence, especially as he realised that it …
  • … for publication in the Scotsman. Yet when the editor, Charles Maclaren, maintained that it would be …
  • … original fieldwork was ‘time thrown away’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 8 [September 1847] ). …
  • … formations. Darwin’s explanation, originally suggested by Lyell, was that the boulders were …
  • … in the subject. The letters also reveal that Lyell sought Darwin’s advice in the preparation …
  • …  and  Manual of elementary geology . In addition, Lyell asked for Darwin’s view of his major new …
  • … or nearly so, or whether they had grown gradually, as Lyell maintained, from one envelope of lava …
  • … critical point in the controversy, and the point on which Lyell at the time felt it necessary to …
  • … would be a ‘thorn in the side of É de B.’ (letter to Charles Lyell, 3 January 1850 ). …
  • … remained unmarried. Each daughter was bequeathed £10,000, Charles was bequeathed £15,500, and his …

Darwin in letters, 1861: Gaining allies

Summary

The year 1861 marked an important change in the direction of Darwin’s work. He had weathered the storm that followed the publication of Origin, and felt cautiously optimistic about the ultimate acceptance of his ideas. The letters from this year provide an…

Matches: 16 hits

  • … 1861 marked an important change in the direction of Darwin’s work. By then, he had weathered the …
  • … an unusually detailed and intimate understanding of Darwin’s problem-solving method of work and …
  • … friend Asa Gray to reprint and distribute in Britain Gray’s series of review-essays on this topic …
  • … III). However, Darwin himself remained unconvinced by Gray’s suggestion that providence may have …
  • … decline later in the year, scientific interest in Darwin’s views continued unabated and indeed …
  • …  by George Maw, for example, singled out Darwin’s explanation of the numerous instances of the …
  • … notably his faithful ‘barometer’ of scientific opinion, Charles Lyell ( see letter to Charles Lyell …
  • … disappointed to learn of John Frederick William Herschel’s initial cool response to his argument; he …
  • … and convert to his theory, Darwin learned of Mill’s view that the reasoning throughout  Origin …
  • … like Cuthbert Collingwood and laymen such as the physician Charles Robert Bree and the Scottish …
  • … and poultry. As he frequently admitted to friends such as Charles Lyell and interested supporters …
  • … prominently in the correspondence of 1861. Here, it was Charles Lyell who continued to act as Darwin …
  • … subsidence, and glaciation in Europe. Through his letters, Lyell involved Darwin in his …
  • … he had published a major paper twenty years earlier. Both Lyell and Darwin encouraged the young …
  • … had been ‘one long gigantic blunder’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 6 September [1861] ). The …
  • … network in support of his son. On 1 August he wrote to Charles Lyell to ask whether he could suggest …

Darwin on race and gender

Summary

Darwin’s views on race and gender are intertwined, and mingled also with those of class. In Descent of man, he tried to explain the origin of human races, and many of the differences between the sexes, with a single theory: sexual selection. Sexual…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … Darwin’s views on race and gender are intertwined, and mingled also with those of …
  • … coloured wings of male butterflies, the male peacock’s elaborate tail, the large horns or antlers on …
  • … increase those features over long periods of time. Darwin’s theory was based partly on the diverse …
  • … conquests and expansion abroad. Thus, while Darwin’s views on race differed widely from those …
  • … them with equal respect. He actively supported women’s higher education in science and medicine, …
  • … Desmond, Adrian and James Moore. 2009. Darwin's sacred cause . London: Allen Lane. …
  • … and human nature’]. Shanafelt, Robert. 2003. How Charles Darwin got emotional expression out …
  • … York: The Free Press. Voss, Julia. 2007, Darwin’s pictures: views of evolutionary theory, …

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 20 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The variation of animals and
  • from this, the editing of excerpts from Fritz Müllers letters on climbing plants to make another
  • to comment on a paper on  Verbascum (mullein) by CDs protégé, John Scott, who was now working in
  • and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an agricultural
  • significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of Darwins and prominent supporter of (though not a
  • Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and J. D. Hookers father, died in August. There
  • the Boys at home: they make the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). Darwin
  • kind friend to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] ). However, …
  • griefs & pains: these alone are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865 ). …
  • Sic transit gloria mundi, with a vengeance’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] ). …
  • know it is folly & nonsense to try anyone’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] ). He
  • claimed, important for his enjoyment of life. He wrote to Charles Lyell on 22 January [1865] , …
  • and Darwin had given it up by early July ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865] ). In
  • and those of Georges Louis Leclerc, comte de Buffon, and Charles Bonnet; Darwin wrote back: ‘I do
  • the Royal Society of Edinburgh criticising Origin . Like Charles Lyell, who wrote to Darwin on
  • for existence (ibid., pp. 27681). Darwin responded to Lyells account in some detail ( see letter
  • the correspondence. At the end of May, the dispute between Charles Lyell and John Lubbock over
  • human antiquity, adding a note to his preface asserting that Lyell in his  Antiquity of man , …
  • set up to support FitzRoys children ( see letter from Charles Shaw, 3 October 1865 ). …
  • The last two months of the year also saw letters from George Henslow, the son of Darwins mentor at

The "wicked book": Origin at 157

Summary

Origin is 157 years old.  (Probably) the most famous book in science was published on 24 November 1859.  To celebrate we have uploaded hundreds of new images of letters, bringing the total number you can look at here to over 9000 representing more than…

Matches: 6 hits

  • from the key players in the drama surrounding Origins publication: Alfred Russel Wallace , …
  • less well-known scientific collaborators who became Darwin's correspondents, Mary Treat , an
  • letters from family and friends, including letters between Charles and his wife Emma, and several of
  • parish of Down in Kent, and a lifelong friend of both Charles and Emma, sent information on
  • over me on rising William Darwin Fox , Charless cousin and another friend, compared
  • Thiselton-Dyer George Cupples H. C. Watson J. J. Weir H. W. Bates

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 21 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now
  • a meeting with Herbert Spencer, who was visiting Darwins neighbour, Sir John Lubbock. In February, …
  • edition was with the printers in July. Much to Darwins annoyance, however, publication was delayed
  • foolish, Penurious, Pragmatical Prigs’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [29 December 1866] ). But the
  • by Darwin to his publisher in December. Much of Darwins correspondence in 1866 was focussed on
  • of hereditary transmission. Debate about Darwins theory of transmutation continued in
  • of a global ice age, while Asa Gray pressed Darwins American publisher for a revised edition of  …
  • the Advancement of Science. Fuller consideration of Darwins work was given by Hooker in an evening
  • Animals & Cult. Plantsto Printers’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1866] ). When
  • in correspondence throughout the year, as in his remark to Lyell, ‘I quite follow you in thinking
  • in this volume), drawing Darwin, Hooker, and the botanist Charles James Fox Bunbury into the
  • more than the belief of a dozen physicists’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 February 1866] ). Darwin
  • … ‘Your fatherentered at the same time with Dr B. J. who received him with triumph. All his friends
  • me to worship Bence Jones in future—’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 May 1866 ). Darwin himself
  • then went for ¾ to Zoolog. Garden!!!!!!!!!’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 April 1866] ). …
  • he had known previously only through correspondence. George Henslow, the son of his Cambridge mentor
  • much to see him, though I dread all exertion’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [12 May 1866] ). Darwins
  • … & admit how little is known on the subject’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 and 4 August [1866] ). …
  • good, & we have been at it many a long year’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 15 February [1866] ). …
  • loneliness’ ( letter from E. C. Langton to Emma and Charles Darwin, [6 and 7? January 1866] ), and
  • borne it better than we c d  have hoped’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 7 February [1866] ). Susan

1.3 Thomas Herbert Maguire, lithograph

Summary

< Back to Introduction This striking portrait of Darwin, dating from 1849, belonged to a series of about sixty lithographic portraits of naturalists and other scientists drawn by Thomas Herbert Maguire. They were successively commissioned over a…

Matches: 21 hits

  • science through the exhibits, and also through the museums library and lectures or classes held
  • natural history among the working classes’. The museums ethos was strongly religious and supportive
  • as its first president, and his friend Revd John Stevens HenslowDarwins Cambridge mentoras
  • embarrassment or difficulty on religious grounds. In return, Henslow persuaded Ransome to give
  • including Murchison, Yarrell, Gould, and Jardine as well as Henslow and Kirby. According to a report
  • prove most ungrateful if it does not second Mr Ransomes benevolent intentions by speedily carrying
  • Science, he was instrumental in securing the Associations decision to hold its July 1851 meeting in
  • the audience for the BAAS gathering. At this stage Maguires series of lithographs, which had, until
  • celebrations, he too became a patron of the Museum, and Henslow presented him with a bound set of
  • for Maguire. The Times report on the Princes visit noted that the BAAS, then celebrating its
  • savans ’, and the same could be said of Maguires series of portraits. They were evidently reissued
  • in the mounts of albumsThe quality of Maguires portraits, as much as the eminence of the
  • media; for example, a photographic reproduction of Darwins head from the Maguire print appears in
  • photographic prints. Darwin thought that the portrait of Henslow wasvery like, but I am not quite
  • from those of his scientific peers. Where Hooker and Lyell are at ease, elegant and impressive, …
  • self-conscious and awkward in his pose. Darwin told Henslow, ‘My wife says she never saw me with the
  • references and bibliography Francis Galtons album of Darwin/ Galton family portraits, from the
  • of the Ipswich Museum. Published by George Ransome, F.L.S., Honorary Secretary’, Gardeners’ …
  • from Ransome to Michael Faraday, 6 June 1851, in Frank A.J.L. James (ed.), The Correspondence of
  • Janet Browne, ‘”I could have retched all night”: Charles Darwin and his bodyin Christopher
  • Chicago Press, 1998), pp. 240287 (pp. 257263). Steven J. Plunkett, ‘Ipswich Museum moralities in

Origin

Summary

Darwin’s most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of his wish to establish priority for the species theory he had spent over twenty years researching. Darwin never intended to write Origin, and had resisted suggestions in 1856…

Matches: 23 hits

  • Darwins most famous work, Origin, had an inauspicious beginning. It grew out of
  • first public presentation of documents relating to Darwins species theory together with Wallaces
  • to the Isle of Wight. Although Darwin and Wallaces papers were published in the Linnean
  • I now do. ’  Even with this endorsement, Darwins spirits remained low. ‘ We are too old
  • Essay containing my exact theory; &amp; asking me to show it to Lyell. The latter &amp; Hooker have
  • have separate copies &amp; will send you one . Darwins weariness in anticipation of the
  • on the big book was interrupted by the arrival of Wallaces essay, he had only just started his
  • on the Isle of Wight, Darwin also heard from John Stevens Henslow, his old mentor and Hookers
  • … ’ It was clear that the big book remained Darwins focus of attention for the full exposition of his
  • a month skeletonising them and completing hisPigeon M.S.’ ( Darwin&#039;s Journal ) ‘At last, …
  • actively sought criticism from trusted readers like Hooker, Lyell, and Thomas Henry Huxley. He
  • his and Darwins species theory had had any effect on Lyell. ‘I think he is somewhat staggered,’ …
  • younger  men converts. My neighbour &amp; excellent naturalist JLubbock is enthusiastic convert. …
  • concern now was to find a suitable publisher, and once again Lyell came to his aid. In late March, …
  • of Darwins work. In light of this, Darwin asked Lyell whether he shouldtell Murray that my Book
  • or the preservation of favoured races” ’, he told Lyell. On 31 March 1859, Darwin wrote to Murray
  • you on the same terms as those on which I publish for Sir Charles Lyell ’. Darwin was uneasy. …
  • the reception of his book, he shared the proofs with Lyell. ‘I cannot too strongly express my
  • … &amp; God knows I have never shirked a difficulty’, he told Lyell on 20 September 1859, ‘ I am
  • in this life. ’ ‘I have just finished your volume’, Lyell told Darwin on 3 October, ‘&amp; right
  • facts on which you ground so many grand generalizations.’ Lyell not only thought Darwins booka
  • 14 to 21 September 1859. Darwin was confident that in time Lyell would beper verted’, telling
  • Selection is in the main safe ’. Darwin reassured Lyell on 11 October that he was aware that

Books on the Beagle

Summary

The Beagle was a sort of floating library.  Find out what Darwin and his shipmates read here.

Matches: 22 hits

  • FitzRoy in the  Narrative  (2: 18). CD, in his letter to Henslow, 9 [September 1831] , …
  • would need, even if it meant duplicating some of FitzRoys own: ‘You are of course welcome to take
  • … . . . were collected in one cabin, under Mr. Stebbings charge, and lent to the officers, without
  • However, from the  Beagle  correspondence, CDs diary, field notebooks, and the extensive
  • are almost always in ink, usually written with CDs favourite Brahma pens. References to books in
  • examples are references to Bernardin de Saint Pierres  Paul et Virginie  and to characters in
  • to do so. For example, two references to Felix Azaras works in notes made during 1833 cite
  • Naturelle  3 (1834): 84115. (DAR 37.1: 677v.; letter to J. S. Henslow, 12 July 1835). * …
  • naturelle . 17 vols. Paris, 182231. (Letter from J. S. Henslow, 1521 January [1833]). Darwin
  • the proceedings . .  . Cambridge, 1833.  (Letter to Charles Whitley, 23 July 1834). …
  • 2d meeting . . . Oxford, 1832 . London, 1833.  (Letter to J. S. Henslow, March 1834 and letter
  • …  London, 1823. (DAR 30.1: 41). ‡ Daubeny, Charles Giles BridleA description of active and
  • dhistoire naturelle.  See Bory de Saint-Vincent, J. B. G. M., ed. Dictionnaire des
  • … § EuclidElements of geometry.  (Letter to J. S. Henslow, 30 October 1831). ‡ Falkner, …
  • 1826. (DAR 36.1: 469v.). Darwin LibraryDown. ‡ Henslow, John Stevens. Geological description
  • … (Vols. 1 and 2, in one, 3d edition, inscribed from J. S. Henslow to CDon his departure’, September
  • 1806. (Inscription in vol. 1: ‘Rob t  FitzRoy to Charles Darwin’;  Red notebook , pp. 75, 105e, …
  • Zoological Journal  5 (18324). (InscribedCharles Darwin Esq from the Author Dunheved Jan 26 1836
  • des polypiers.  Paris, 1821. (DAR 30.1: 13v.; letter to J. S. Henslow, 24 July7 November 1834). …
  • … (DAR 30.2: 182v., 184). Darwin LibraryDown. * Lyell, CharlesPrinciples of geology . . . …
  • … ‘Given me by Capt. F.R C. Darwin’; vol.2 (1832), ‘Charles Darwin M: Video. Novem r . 1832’; vol. 3
  • Reyno de Chile ). Part 2. Madrid, 1795. (Inscription: ‘Charles Darwin Valparaiso 1834’). Darwin

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 21 hits

  • Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • … - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwins niece, Lucy, responds to Darwins
  • February 1867] Mary Barber responds to Darwins queries about Expression from
  • him. Letter 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October
  • of wormholes. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] …
  • and offers to observe birds, insects or plants on Darwins behalf. Letter 8683 - …
  • passes on brief observations of an angry pig and her nieces ears. Letter 8701 - …
  • wife of naturalist John Lubbock, responds to Darwins request that she make observations of her pet
  • Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27 March 1864] Darwin thanks Hooker for
  • and orangs. Letter 5705 - Haast, J. F. J. von to Darwin, [4 December 1867] …
  • 9 November 1868] Darwins nephews, Edmund and Charles, write to Emma Darwins sister, …
  • in a marble tablet”. Letter 6815 - Scott, J. to Darwin, [2 July 1869] John
  • Men: Letter 385  - Wedgwood, S. E. &amp; J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] …
  • Hall, Staffordshire. Letter 1219  - Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, [3 February 1849] …
  • the Isle of White. Letter 4433  - Wright, Charles to Gray, A., [20, 25, 26 March
  • to look for more samples. Letter 4928  - Henslow, G. to Darwin, [11 November 1865] …
  • Men: Letter 1836  - Berkeley, M. J. to Darwin, [7 March 1856] Clergyman and
  • to feed to them. Letter 2069  - Tenant, J. to Darwin, [31 March 1857] James
  • University of Bonn. Letter 6046  - Weir, J. J. to Darwin, [24 March 1868] …
  • in the future. Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [12-13 March 1863] …
  • Men: Letter 378  - Darwin to Henslow, J. S., [20 September 1837] Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 18 hits

  • results of the  Beagle  voyage still dominated Darwin&#039;s working life, but throughout these
  • Down House was altered and extended to accommodate Darwins growing family and the many relatives
  • for publication in  The zoology of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle  (183843) but were deferred when
  • to A. Y. Spearman, 9 October 1843, n. 1). Darwin&#039;s inner circle: first discussions of
  • is like confessing a murder) immutable Darwins earlier scientific friendships were not
  • his ideas on species mutability with Hooker, Horner, Jenyns, Lyell, Owen, and Charles James Fox
  • … (it is like confessing a murder) immutable’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [11 January 1844] ). Nine
  • that his close friends were not outraged by Darwins heterodox opinions and later in the year both
  • of 1844 to read (see  Correspondence  vol. 4, letter to J. D. Hooker, 8 [February 1847]). Darwin
  • Perhaps the most interesting letter relating to Darwins species theory, which also bears on his
  • listed possible editors: at first he proposed any one of Lyell, Henslow, Edward Forbes, William
  • work. But the list was subsequently altered after Darwins second, and possibly third, thoughts on
  • health. Volcanoes, rocks, and fossils Darwins published work during this period
  • of elevation’, which formed the basis of discussions with Charles Lyell and Leonard Horner in
  • the geology of this vast area, reflecting the influence of Lyells  Principles of geology  (18303
  • Journal of researches  for a second edition in 1845. At Lyells recommendation, arrangements were
  • by Darwin, even though he had collected plants extensively. Henslow, who had undertaken to describe
  • laws of creation, Geographical Distribution’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 February 1845] ) and

Darwin in letters, 1821-1836: Childhood to the Beagle voyage

Summary

Darwin's first known letters were written when he was twelve. They continue through school-days at Shrewsbury, two years as a medical student at Edinburgh University, the undergraduate years at Cambridge, and the of the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle.…

Matches: 14 hits

  • Darwin&#039;s first known letters were written when he was twelve. They continue through
  • years at Cambridge, and the five years of the voyage of H.M.SBeagle . In 1836, the twenty-seven
  • in Shrewsbury, and of the role his family played in Darwins early life; those from Sarah and Fanny
  • The letters written to Darwin during the voyage of H.M.SBeagle  kept him informed of such
  • own copy to his son in 1820, and in the early 1820s Darwins brother Erasmus made him his assistant
  • of beetles. Fox also introduced him to John Stevens Henslow and Darwin was a regular presence at the
  • parties organised by the professor of botany. And it was Henslow who, encouraging Darwin to broaden
  • fellows your friends at Barmouth must be’ ( see letter to J. M. Herbert, [13 September 1828] ). …
  • a naturalist on a voyage of exploration arose because of Henslows recognition of the abilities
  • had been reasonably answered. During the voyage of H.M.SBeagle Darwins letters convey the
  • enquiry. Coupled with this commitment was Darwins growing recognition of his ability to contribute
  • around his observations and tried out his theories on Henslow in the privacy of their letters. Well
  • of which were clear to him from his communication with Henslow and his study of Lyells
  • years that testify to the wealth and quality of Darwins collections and observations. But more than