skip to content

Darwin Correspondence Project

Search: contains ""

400 Bad Request

Bad Request

Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand.


Apache Server at dcp-public.lib.cam.ac.uk Port 443
Search:
in keywords
9 Items

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 21 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the University of Cambridge. These works, catalogued by H. W. Rutherford ( Catalogue of the library
  • Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. Lawrence 1819] read Bory S t
  • 1822] Falconers remark on the influence of climate [W. Falconer 1781] [DAR *119: 2v. …
  • 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian Islands 8 consult D r
  • … [Dampier 1697] Sportsmans repository 4 to . [W. H. Scott 1820]— contains much on dogs
  • of variation in animals in the different isl ds  of E Indian Archipelago— [DAR *119: 6v.] …
  • … [DAR *119: 8v.] A history of British Birds by W. Macgillivray [W. Macgillivray 183752].— I
  • The Highlands & Western Isl ds  letter to Sir W Scott [MacCulloch 1824] at Maer? W. F. …
  • 2 vols. 8vo. avec 2 atlas 4to. ibid, 181823. £1 2 s  [E. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire 181823] …
  • said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith 1793] Fabricius (very old
  • at Maer.— Lives of Kepler & Galileo. Drinkwater [J. E. Drinkwater] 1833]— Prof. …
  • on Aurochs [Weissenborn 1838] Smiths grammar [J. E. Smith 1821] & introduct of Botany [J. …
  • Martineau [H. Martineau 1837] Layards Babylon [Layard 1853] Vol. V of Campbells
  • Land [Twamley 1852] Life of T. Moore [?T. Moore 18536] have read vol III. Mundys

Science, Work and Manliness

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters In 1859, popular didactic writer William Landels published the first edition of what proved to be one of his best-selling works, How Men Are Made. "It is by work, work, work" he told his middle class audience, …

Matches: 11 hits

  • … In describing what they did using the language of labour, Darwin and his male colleagues asserted …
  • … 1. Which elements of the scientific process do Darwin and his male correspondents tend to …
  • … another's scientific work? How does this differ from how Darwin praised women's work ? …
  • … Letters Letter 282 - Darwin to Fox, W. D., [9 - 12 August 1835] Darwin …
  • … thinking and hammering”. Letter 1533 - Darwin to Dana, J. D., [27 September 1853] …
  • … the labour bestowed on it are “really surprising” and Darwin hopes that Dana’s health withstood the …
  • … labour and patience”. Letter 4262 - Darwin to Gray, A., [4 August 1863] Darwin …
  • … which was “no slight labour”. Letter 3901 - Darwin to Falconer, H., [5 & 6 January …
  • … worked out paper on which Falconer has worked very hard. Darwin hopes that Falconer’s extreme labour …
  • … investigation as a physical and laborious process, he envies Darwin and other “hard working …
  • … arrange facts. Letter 8153 - Darwin to Darwin, W. E., [9 January 1872] Darwin …

Religion

Summary

Design|Personal Belief|Beauty|The Church Perhaps the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same can be said of the evolution controversy today; however the nature of the disputes and the manner in…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same …
  • … nineteenth century were different in important ways. Many of Darwin's leading supporters were …
  • … their religious beliefs with evolutionary theory. Darwin's own writing, both in print and …
  • … much as possible. A number of correspondents tried to draw Darwin out on his own religious views, …
  • … political contexts. Design Darwin was not the first to challenge …
  • … on the controversial topic of design. The first is between Darwin and Harvard botanist Asa Gray, …
  • … second is a single letter from naturalist A. R. Wallace to Darwin on design and natural selection. …
  • … of each fragment at the base of my precipice”. Darwin and Wallace Letter 5140 …
  • … Letter 5307 — Darwin, C. R. to Boole, M. E., 14 Dec 1866 Darwin believes he is unable to …
  • … Letter 8070 — Darwin, C. R. to Abbot, F. E., 16 Nov [1871] Darwin explains why he must …
  • … Letter 1536 — Darwin, C. R. to Lubbock, J. W. (b), 11 Oct [1853] Darwin gives his opinion to …

Hermann Müller

Summary

Hermann (Heinrich Ludwig Hermann) Müller, was born in Mühlberg near Erfurt in 1829. He was the younger brother of Fritz Müller (1822–97). Following the completion of his secondary education at Erfurt in 1848, he studied natural sciences at Halle and Berlin…

Matches: 9 hits

  • making his first of many trips to the Alps in the summer of 1853. He spent a probationary year
  • Fritzs recommendation, he read the German translation of Darwins On the origin of species , and
  • an article, ‘Thatsachen der Laubmooskunde für Darwin’ (Facts from the science of mosses for Darwin) …
  • his plans to study Westphalian orchids, inspired both by Darwins work on orchids and observations
  • of orchids. Müller did not merely repeat Darwins observations, but began looking at the ways
  • visitors from gaining access. In October 1867, Müller sent Darwin a letter describing his
  • flowers by means of insects and their mutual adaptations). Darwin could not wait to finish the book
  • ordered a copy to be sent to the Royal Society of LondonDarwin was instrumental in getting a
  • Müller had spent almost every summer since 1853 in different parts of the Alps and in 1881 published

New material added to the American edition of Origin

Summary

A ‘revised and augmented’ American edition of Origin came on the market in July 1860, and was the only authorised edition available in the US until 1873. It incorporated many of the changes Darwin made to the second English edition, but still contained…

Matches: 22 hits

  • Introduction Soon after Origin was published, Darwin received a letter from Asa Gray
  • book and to secure the author a share in possible profits. Darwin responded favourably to Grays
  • the new Edit to be reprinted, & not the old.— Darwin was motivated by more than
  • editionand were preparing for distribution. Acting on Darwins behalf, Gray duly contacted D. …
  • the second English edition, transmitting their response to Darwin (see letters from Asa Gray, [10
  • States law to honour foreign copyright, they agreed to grant Darwin a share of the profits from
  • preparing a new edition at some future date and asked Darwin to provide them with any changes he
  • of species (two letters to Baden Powell, 18 January 1860), Darwin subsequently changed his mind. On
  • espousing favourable views of the transmutation of species; Darwin sent this off to Gray enclosed in
  • A month later, in his letter of 8 March [1860], Darwin sent Gray several more substantive
  • Cottrell Watson in his letter of [3? January 1860]) that Darwin wanted inserted at the conclusion of
  • edition in the letter to Lyell, 18 [and 19 February 1860]. Darwin suggested to Gray that the title
  • augmentedAmerican edition. Most of the emendations that Darwin had sent were incorporated into the
  • edition, yet it incorporated many of the other changes Darwin made to the second edition; it also
  • prise sur lui.’’ In England, the Hon. and Rev. W. Herbert, afterwards Dean of Manchester, in
  • in 1844. In the last or tenth and much improved edition (1853, p. 155), the anonymous author says: ‘ …
  • animaux sauvages démontre déjà la variabilité limitée des espèces. Les expériences sur les
  • of finality, ‘‘puissance mystérieuse, indéterminée; fatalité pour les uns; pour les autres, volonté …
  • de lexistence du monde, la forme, le volume et la durée de chacun deux, en raison de sa destinée
  • qui est pour lui sa raison d’être.’’ In 1853, a celebrated geologist, Count Keyserling
  • … * It is curious how completely my grandfather, Dr. Erasmus Darwin,  anticipated these erroneous
  • the world. Hooker has recently shown that in the S. E. corner of Australia, where apparently there

Was Darwin an ecologist?

Summary

One of the most fascinating aspects of Charles Darwin’s correspondence is the extent to which the experiments he performed at his home in Down, in the English county of Kent, seem to prefigure modern scientific work in ecology.

Matches: 22 hits

  • The case is a sore puzzle to me.— Charles Darwin to J. D. Hooker, 10 December [1866] . …
  • or regurgitated by birds with non-muscular gizzards (e.g. toucans) would have lower germination
  • One of the most fascinating aspects of Charles Darwins correspondence is the extent to which the
  • work in ecology. Despite the difference in language between Darwins letter and the modern
  • in seeds that have no nutritive value. Other subjects that Darwin worked on at Down also have
  • the mix of species in a plot of grass; pollination. Was Darwin, then, an early ecologist? The
  • was becoming well enough established in universities that Darwinsheld together with a piece of
  • laboratory institute in Würzburg, criticised Darwins experiments on movement in root radicles as
  • As a gentleman amateur, observing his surroundings, Darwin seems to fit easily into an earlier
  • between organisms over timewere highly innovative. Darwins own experiments challenged the old, …
  • clearly did not mark an epoch in the history of science; Darwin and some of his correspondents
  • … ‘The number of new wordsis something dreadful’, Darwin wrote to T. H. Huxley on 22 December
  • The word first appeared in English in E. Ray Lankesters translation of Haeckels History of
  • world only from the late nineteenth century onwards. Darwin himself never used the word, either in
  • the study of all those complex interrelations referred to by Darwin as the conditions of the
  • So, we should be careful not to make the same mistake with Darwin. When we try to understand the
  • theres also a horizontal dimension, the question of what Darwin himself thought he was doing. …
  • realising it, and what areas are still contested? Darwins intellectual context Darwin
  • be involved in chemical or meteorological investigations. By Darwins time the term was associated
  • Natürliche Schöpfungsgeschichte . Translation revised by E. Ray Lankester. 2 vols. London: Henry S. …
  • Entomologist  37: pp. 206-210 Lindley, John. 1853The vegetable kingdom; or, the structure
  • …  Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Rothschild, L. W., and Jordan, K. 1903. A revision of

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 23 hits

  • Charles Darwins observations on the development of his children,[1began the
  • is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the
  • lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on
  • the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwins notes reveals, he closely
  • William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are
  • The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwins character clearly perceived by Emma during
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6For in these notes, Darwins deep scientific curiosity transcends his
  • that on occasion he refers to William asit’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate
  • memories.[8Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwins scientific goal, the notes here
  • the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had increased by five: …
  • the onset of frowning, smiling, etc., as was the focus of Darwins attention on William and Anne, …
  • of logical thought and language. On 20 May 1854, Darwin again took over the notebook and, …
  • all the notes until July 1856, when the observations ceased. Darwins later entries, like Emmas, …
  • Transcription: 1 [9W. Erasmus. Darwin born. Dec. 27 th . 1839.—[10During first week. …
  • morning put on an unconspicuous bonnet of C. Langton,[52W. instantly observed it knew whose it was
  • leaves, stuck them in the ground to observe if the Bees, w d  look at them.[53Willy across whole
  • remonstrating with him on telling such a Burster (as he w d . call it), he answered, “Well then I
  • written in pencil by CD and subsequently overwritten by Emma Darwin. The transcription throughout
  • … [15] ‘Annie . . . fortnightwas written by Emma Darwin on the verso of page 3 and opposite the
  • The name and address of a Mrs Locke are noted in Emma Darwins 1843 diary. [16The following
  • books that she could recall encountering as a child (H. E. Litchfield papers, CUL). [60] …
  • to be in the same hand. One such entry, made on 22 July 1853, the last of a series of similarly
  • Darwin family stayed in Eastbourne from 14 July to 4 August 1853 (de Beer ed. 1959a, p. 13). …

People featured in the Dutch photograph album

Summary

Here is a list of people that appeared in the photograph album Darwin received for his birthday on 12 February 1877 from scientific admirers in the Netherlands. Many thanks to Hester Loeff for identifying and researching them. No. …

Matches: 2 hits

  • … list of people that appeared in the  photograph album Darwin received for his birthday on 12 …
  • … nat. et med. cand.   Leiden 8 March 1853 Amsterdam 4 may …

People featured in the Dutch photograph album

Summary

List of people appearing in the photograph album Darwin received from scientific admirers in the Netherlands for his birthday on 12 February 1877. We are grateful to Hester Loeff for providing this list and for permission to make her research available.…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … List of people appearing in the  photograph album Darwin received from scientific admirers in …
  • … Died just a few months after the album was sent to Charles Darwin at the age of 53 …
  • … Geologist, Economist an Darwinist. Corresponded with Darwin and translated The descent of Man in …
  • … nat. et med. cand.   Leiden 8 March 1853 Amsterdam 4 May …