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List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … Vienna (1) Appleton, C. E. C. B. (2) …
  • … Austin, C. F. (1) Aveling, E. B. (7) …
  • … Bacon, Booth (1) Badger, E. W. (3) …
  • … Baranoff, W. (2) Barber, M. E. (1) …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …
  • … Darwin, H. E. (60) Darwin, Horace (30) …
  • … Peacock, George (2) Pearce, Horace (1) …

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

‘My heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old Shrewsbury friend Henry Johnson on 14 November 1880. Darwin became fully devoted to earthworms in the spring of the year, just after finishing the manuscript of…

Matches: 20 hits

  • heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • Charles Harrison Tindal, sent a cache of letters from two of Darwins grandfathers clerical friends
  • divines to see a pigs body opened is very amusing’, Darwin replied, ‘& that about my
  • registry offices, and produced a twenty-page history of the Darwin family reaching back to the
  • to find an ordinary mortal who could laugh’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin to Charles and Emma Darwin, …
  • wants a grievance to hang an article upon’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [28 January 1880] ). …
  • one or both to his daughter Henrietta ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 1 February [1880] ). ‘The
  • he will have the last word’, she warned ( letter from H. E. Litchfield, [1 February 1880] ). ‘He
  • pretended, ‘but the subject has amused me’ ( letter to W. C. McIntosh, 18 June 1880 ). Members of
  • While on honeymoon with his new wife, Ida, in the Alps, Horace spotted worms at high elevations, …
  • saw a steam tramimagine my excitement’ ( letter from Horace Darwin to Emma Darwin, [18 September
  • the reasons, I should be greatly obliged’ ( letter from W. Z. Seddon, 2 February 1880) . Darwin
  • he added, ‘hardly anybody has accepted’ ( letter to W. Z. Seddon, 4 February 1880 ). On 16
  • aided in any way direct attacks on religion’ ( letter to E. B. Aveling, 13 October 1880 ). Finally
  • elected fellow of the Royal Society. He rejoiced to see Horace and Ida settled in their new home in

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 17 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • he fretted, just days before his departure ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] …
  • that his grandfather had felt the same way. In 1792, Erasmus Darwin had written: ‘The worst thing I
  • all over like a baked pear’ ( enclosure in letter from R. W. Dixon, 20 December 1879 ). The year
  • by a person from his solicitors office to complete Horaces marriage settlement ( letter from W. M
  • … & would please Francis’, he pointed out ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 13 March [1879 ]). …
  • thoughtperfect in every way’ ( letter from E. A. Wheler, 25 March 1879 ). She suggested that
  • and he regretted going beyond histether’ ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 5 June 1879 , and
  • … … neither cross nor ennuied’ (Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [4 August 1879] (DAR 219.1: 125)). Darwin
  • objection to the engagement between his daughter Ida and Horace Darwin. This was all the more
  • at the Farrershome, Abinger Hall, on several occasions. Horace had first approached Farrer to
  • Farrers objection was based on his impression of Horaces poor health and lack of profession, and
  • reported, because Darwin told Farrera great deal about Horace that he did not know, especially
  • say that he has opposed it’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [4 August 1879] (DAR 219.1: …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 18 hits

  • The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • been the naturalist and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a
  • intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). The death of a Cambridge friend, …
  • pleasures of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such
  • one looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). …
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • …  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] ). Darwin mentioned his poor health so frequently in
  • 1874 ). Séances, psychics, and sceptics Darwin excused himself for reasons of
  • the month, another Williams séance was held at the home of Darwins cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those
  • were family affairs. Coral reefs His son Horace had suggested a new edition of the
  • all the horrid bother of correction’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 21 [March 1874] ). The book
  • were also doing well. Despite ill health, his youngest son Horace began the year by taking the
  • without being bad & have done pretty well’ ( letter to Horace Darwin, 9 January [1874] ). …
  • Kent. After a months trial Darwin wrote to the firm about Horaces illness: ‘My son is most
  • the subject & that must be enough for me’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). …
  • the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. Fox,  11 May [1874] ). …
  • artificial gastric juice  for about a week ( letter from E. E. Klein, 14 May 1874 ). John Burdon

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 18 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If
  • he ought to do what I am doing pester them with letters.’ Darwin was certainly true to his word. The
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • the mating process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • and his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing gave Darwin much vexation. ‘My book is
  • 1867 and had expected to complete it in a fortnight. But at Darwins request, he modified his
  • the text. This increased the amount of work substantially. Darwin asked Murray to intervene, …
  • … … though it would be a great loss to the Book’. But Darwins angry letter to Murray crossed one from
  • to remuneration I shall look rather blank’ ( letter from W. S. Dallas, 8 January 1868 ). Darwin
  • as stone, if it were not quite mollified by your note’. Darwin enclosed a cheque to Dallas for £55  …
  • well as ofvictorious males getting wives’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 25 February [1868] ). …
  • pigeon magenta. To Weir, he wrote on 27 February : ‘It w d  be a fine trial to cut off the eyes
  • and had himself watched elephants cry (letters to W. E. Darwin, [15 March 1868] and 8 April
  • screaming in patients undergoing vaccination ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [7 April 1868] ). Francis
  • at Leonards success’, Darwin wrote to his youngest son, Horace, on 26 July , ‘is it not splendid? …

Referencing women’s work

Summary

Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, but whether and how they were acknowledged in print involved complex considerations of social standing, professional standing, and personal preference.…

Matches: 15 hits

  • Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, …
  • standing, and personal preferenceGeorge Romanes in his 1882 publication Animal intelligence
  • set of selected letters is followed by letters relating to Darwin's 1881 publication
  • throughout Variation . Letter 2395 - Darwin to Holland, Miss, [April 1860] …
  • anonymised and masculinised. Letter 3316 - Darwin to Nevill, D. F., [12 November
  • Nevill is referenced by name for herkindnessin Darwins Fertilisation of Orchids . …
  • critic. Letter 4370 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [April - May 1865] Darwin
  • asfriends in Surrey”. Letter 4794 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [25 March 1865] …
  • B”. Letter 7060 - Wedgwood, F. J. to Darwin, [1867 - 72] Darwins
  • Letter 8321 - Darwin to Litchfield, H. E., [13 May 1872] Darwin consults his
  • Letter 8427 - Darwin to Litchfield H. E., [25 July 1872] Darwin thanks Henrietta for
  • Darwin, H., [1 November 1877] Darwin asks his sons, Horace and Francis, to observe
  • … - Darwin, H. to Darwin, [7 October 1880] Horace writes to his father with information
  • St Tibbs Row. Darwin proudly referenced the work of "My son Horace" in Vegetable Mould
  • Letter 13037 - Darwin to Darwin, W. E., [5 February 1881] Darwin discusses

Movement in Plants

Summary

The power of movement in plants, published on 7 November 1880, was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which the assistance of one of his children, Francis Darwin, is mentioned on the title page. The research for this…

Matches: 22 hits

  • The power of movement in plants , published on 7 November 1880was the final large botanical work
  • about their research while he was away from home. Although Darwin lacked a state of the art research
  • the advantages of both while Francis was working abroad. Darwin was privy to the inner workings of
  • methods and use the most advanced laboratory equipment. Darwin also benefitted from the instrument
  • plant physiology, but it was at its core informed by Darwins theory of evolution, particularly by
  • … ‘One general law or systemIn the early 1860s, at a time when his health was especially
  • and plants under domestication , eventually published in 1868, became too strenuous. His paper, ‘On
  • in the  Journal of the Linnean Society  ( Botany ) in 1865, and was an attempt to explain the
  • reproduced as a small book, giving it a much wider audience. Darwin was not the first naturalist to
  • from correspondents in response to the work, and by 1873 began preparing a second edition, which
  • about the nature of movement, so much so, that at one point Darwin had considered combining the
  • digestive processes. With his final great botanical work, Darwin would attemptto bring all the
  • emotions had their origins in non-human animal expression. Darwin had not done experimental work in
  • viewed the division between animals and plants as absolute, Darwin was interested in similarities. …
  • off as completely as possible ’. He had also asked Horace to discuss the point with his friend
  • made ’. Jemmy (a nickname for Darwins youngest son Horace) did, indeed, design an improved version
  • but a version of it was made by Darwins youngest son Horace, who also made an improved version of
  • FranksTransversal-Heliotropismus’ ( letter from WEDarwin10 February [1880] ). …
  • … ‘ I am very sorry that Sachs is so sceptical, for I w drather convert him than any other half
  • aslittle discsandgreenish bodies’ ( letter to WTThiselton-Dyer29 October 1879 ). …
  • that he had not been able to observe earlier ( letter to WTThiselton-Dyer20 November 1879 ). …
  • pay more for at the usual rate of charging per inch &c they w dbe over £40’; he suggested

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 24 hits

  • Charles Darwins observations on the development of his children,[1began the research that
  • lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on
  • the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwins notes reveals, he closely
  • William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are
  • The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwins character clearly perceived by Emma during
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6For in these notes, Darwins deep scientific curiosity transcends his
  • that on occasion he refers to William asit’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate
  • memories.[8Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwins scientific goal, the notes here
  • the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had increased by five: …
  • born 16 August 1848; Leonard, born 15 January 1850; and Horace, born 18 May 1851. It appears to have
  • the onset of frowning, smiling, etc., as was the focus of Darwins attention on William and Anne, …
  • Transcription: 1 [9W. Erasmus. Darwin born. Dec. 27 th . 1839.—[10During first week. …
  • morning put on an unconspicuous bonnet of C. Langton,[52W. instantly observed it knew whose it was
  • leaves, stuck them in the ground to observe if the Bees, w d  look at them.[53Willy across whole
  • ought to do what a child says to a maid.[70] 46  Horace[712½. G. When shall you wean
  • But Papa you ought to forgive me if I do. 46v.  Horace seeing one of the huntsman not in a
  • P. Yes. Well I will then. Lenny trying to amuse Horace (crying  Baby I said Id got a bit of
  • … ”.[76] June 61854. Lenny after quarrelling with Horace, “I  feel  that I shall never play
  • … (ie liquorice) 49v.   July 25 th[77] /54/ Horace struck Lenny with a rake & Lenny
  • remonstrating with him on telling such a Burster (as he w d . call it), he answered, “Well then I
  • … “I bets that is a rum thing”, the bet being offered to Horace Lenny. When ill with Fever &amp
  • if you wont, you must.”— 50bv. [80Horace 3 yrs old walking with Bessy in London saw a
  • you the nature of these sort of persons (meaning himself & Horace who were making a horrid mess) …
  • books that she could recall encountering as a child (H. E. Litchfield papers, CUL). [60] …

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 18 hits

  • I cannot bear to think of the future The year 1876 started out sedately enough with
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to
  • four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11
  • and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and
  • in him fornew matter’ (letter to Asa Gray, 28 January 1876). The preparation of the second edition
  • When Smith, Elder and Company proposed reissuing two of Darwins three volumes of the geology of
  • single-volume edition titled Geological observations , Darwin resisted making any revisions at
  • been cast by thepoorest curs in London’ ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [4 February 1876] ). …
  • for the real machine.’ It was the mechanically minded Horace, however, who was the first to type a
  • it is. ’ After describing how youplay on keys ’, Horace pointed out that in less than a day he
  • to present it to the Royal Society. He was pleased that Horace was off to Birmingham to lecture to
  • of illness & misery there is in the world’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 26 May [1876] ). A
  • we have & you are one of the best of all’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 11 September [1876] ). …
  • she confided to Henrietta (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [31 August 1876] (DAR 219.9: …
  • herself & is so tender’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [13 September 1876] (DAR 210.6
  • completed autobiography (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [13 September 1876] (DAR 210.6: …
  • horticulturists and agriculturists in France ( letter from E. M. Heckel, 27 December 1876 ). In

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Observers Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] Darwins
  • 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] Darwins
  • Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] Anne Jane Cupples, …
  • on furrows and earthworm activity to her brother-in-law, Horace. She has dug a number of trenches, …
  • Himalaya and Tibet. Letter 4139  - Darwin, W. E. to Darwin, [4 May 1863] …
  • detail. Family letter: Darwin, E. to Darwin, W. E., [January 23rd 1887]: Emma
  • of his garden. Letter 4233  - Tegetmeier, W. B. to Darwin, [29 June - 7 July 1863] …
  • and edited bya lady”. Darwin, E. to Darwin, W. E. , (March, 1862 - DAR 219.1:49) …
  • over. Letter 8153  - Darwin to  Darwin, W. E., [9 January 1872] Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1881: Old friends and new admirers

Summary

In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began writing about all the eminent men he had met. He embarked on this task, which formed an addition to his autobiography, because he had nothing else to do. He had…

Matches: 17 hits

  • In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, …
  • a very old man, who probably will not last much longer.’ Darwins biggest fear was not death, but
  • do’, he wrote despondently to Joseph Dalton Hooker on 15 June , concluding, ‘I must look forward
  • provision for the dividing of his wealth after his death. Darwins gloominess was compounded by the
  • and new admirers got in touch, and, for all his fears, Darwin found several scientific topics to
  • Evolution old and new when revising his essay on Erasmus Darwins scientific work, and that Darwin
  • in a review of Unconscious memory in Kosmos and sent Darwin a separate letter for
  • decided to print500 more, making 2000’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 January 1881 ). Unlike
  • … & very surprising the whole case is to me’ (letters to W. E. Darwin, 31 January [1881] and
  • suggestions of such plants, especially annuals ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 21 March [1881] ) …
  • with you’, a Swedish teacher told him ( letter from C. E. Södling, 14 October 1881 ), while H. M. …
  • little, to the general stock of knowledge’ ( letter to E. W. Bok, 10 May 1881 ). Josef Popper, an
  • of the nature & capabilities of the Fuegians’ ( letter to W. P. Snow, 22 November 1881 ). …
  • was the progress of his sonscareers. The success of Horaces recently established Cambridge
  • … ‘not absurd for one with no pretensions’ (l etter from W. E. Darwin, 13 January [1881 ]), Darwin
  • the help of Lord Rayleigh, George Darwin, and Horace Darwinthe task of defending Darwins arguments
  • grandson, was born in Cambridge. His parents, Ida and Horace Darwin, named him Erasmus in honour of

Diagrams and drawings in letters

Summary

Over 850 illustrations from the printed volumes of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin have been added to the online transcripts of the letters. The contents include maps, diagrams, drawings, sketches and photographs, covering geological, botanical,…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … of investigations carried out at Silchester with Frank and Horace [Darwin] on earthworm activity at …
  • … containing bud samples,  12 May 1878 G. H. Darwin's drawings of  Thalia dealbata  …
  • … of the movement of a caterpillar,  1 July 1879 E. Desrousseaux's theory that all …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 23 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he
  • to read in Notebook C ( Notebooks , pp. 31928). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • editorsidentification of the book or article to which Darwin refers. A full list of these works is
  • page number (or numbers, as the case may be) on which Darwins entry is to be found. The
  • in the bibliography that other editions were available to Darwin. While it is likely that Darwin
  • the University of Cambridge. These works, catalogued by H. W. Rutherford ( Catalogue of the library
  • Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. Lawrence 1819] read Bory S t
  • 1822] Falconers remark on the influence of climate [W. Falconer 1781] [DAR *119: 2v. …
  • 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian Islands 8 consult D r
  • … [Dampier 1697] Sportsmans repository 4 to . [W. H. Scott 1820]— contains much on dogs
  • of variation in animals in the different isl ds  of E Indian Archipelago— [DAR *119: 6v.] …
  • 2 vols. 8vo. avec 2 atlas 4to. ibid, 181823. £1 2 s  [E. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire 181823] …
  • said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith 1793] Fabricius (very old
  • … (Emma) (read) M rs  Frys Life [Fry 1847] Horace Walpoles letter to C t . of
  • London.  *128: 180; 128: 5, 9 Moquin-Tandon, Horace Bénédict Alfred. 1841.  Éléments   …
  • Mr. Warrenne . London119: 21b Walpole, Horace. 1845Memoirs of the reign of King

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 23 hits

  • At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition
  • had surfaced since the fourth edition appeared at the end of 1866 and had told his cousin William
  • … & I am sick of correcting’ ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to W. D. Fox, 12 December [1868
  • that is something’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 January 1869] ). Much of the remainder of
  • material on emotional expression. Yet the scope of Darwins interests remained extremely broad, and
  • plants, and earthworms, subjects that had exercised Darwin for decades, and that would continue to
  • Carl von  Nägeli and perfectibility Darwins most substantial addition to  Origin  was a
  • Nägeli, a Swiss botanist and professor at Munich (Nägeli 1865). Darwin had considered Nägelis paper
  • principal engine of change in the development of species. Darwin correctly assessed Nägelis theory
  • in most morphological features (Nägeli 1865, p. 29). Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now
  • are & must be morphological’. The comment highlights Darwins apparent confusion about Nägelis
  • … ‘purely morphological’. The modern reader may well share Darwins uncertainty, but Nägeli evidently
  • pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical examples he could use
  • problems of heredity Another important criticism that Darwin sought to address in the fifth
  • prevailing theory of blending inheritance that Jenkin and Darwin both shared, would tend to be lost
  • … ( Origin  5th ed., pp. 1034). The terminology that Darwin and others employed in these matters ( …
  • … ‘I must have expressed myself atrociously’, Darwin wrote to Alfred Russel Wallace on 2 February , …
  • of  Origin  was the result of correspondence between Darwin and the geologist James Croll. In the
  • but it was his theory of alternate ice ages that piqued Darwins interest the most. He wrote, ‘this
  • … ( letter to James Croll, 31 January [1869] ). Darwin had argued ( Origin , pp. 3778) that plant
  • troubled at the short duration of the world according to Sir W. Thompson, for