skip to content

Darwin Correspondence Project

Search: contains ""

400 Bad Request

Bad Request

Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand.


Apache Server at dcp-public.lib.cam.ac.uk Port 443
Search:
in keywords
26 Items
Page:  1 2  Next

The death of Anne Elizabeth Darwin

Summary

Charles and Emma Darwin’s eldest daughter, Annie, died at the age of ten in 1851.   Emma was heavily pregnant with their fifth son, Horace, at the time and could not go with Charles when he took Annie to Malvern to consult the hydrotherapist, Dr Gully.…

Matches: 9 hits

  • lost the joy of the Household Charles and Emma Darwins eldest daughter, Annie, died at
  • to Malvern to consult the hydrotherapist, Dr Gully. Darwin wrote a memorial of his daughter
  • her own reactions in a poignant set of notes, which Emma Darwin kept. Links to a longer
  • and illness follow the transcriptions. Charles Darwins memorial of Anne Elizabeth
  • her dear joyous face. Blessings on her.— April 30. 1851. Notes: 1
  • …  ‘y. 4 An interlineation in pencil in Emma Darwins hand reads: ‘Mamma: what shall we do
  • To W. D. Fox, [ 27 March 1851 ] To Emma Darwin,  [17 April 1851] First letter to
  • To Emma Darwin, [ 19 April 1851 ] Second letter from Emma Darwin, [ 19 April 1851 ] …
  • To Fanny Wedgwood, [ 21 April 1851 ] First letter to Emma Darwin, [ 21 April 1851 ] …

Referencing women’s work

Summary

Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, but whether and how they were acknowledged in print involved complex considerations of social standing, professional standing, and personal preference.…

Matches: 12 hits

  • Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, …
  • standing, and personal preferenceGeorge Romanes in his 1882 publication Animal intelligence
  • set of selected letters is followed by letters relating to Darwin's 1881 publication
  • work are referenced throughout Variation . Letter 2395 - Darwin to Holland, …
  • her identity is both anonymised and masculinised. Letter 3316 - Darwin to Nevill, D
  • Nevill is referenced by name for herkindnessin Darwins Fertilisation of Orchids . …
  • being acknowledged publicly as a science critic. Letter 4370 - Wedgwood, L. C. to
  • are identified only asfriends in Surrey”. Letter 4794 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [25
  • Sir C. Lyellor received fromMiss. B”. Letter 7060 - Wedgwood, F. J. to
  • was referenced in the final publication. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C
  • are not cited in Expression . Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., …
  • infants identified by name in Expression was novelist Elizabeth Gaskell for her description

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 11 hits

  • Charles Darwins daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and July 1871 in a
  • excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwins letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwins own discussion of religious belief in
  • missions due to take place between 26 February and 5 March 1871 in four towns within the deanery of
  • Origin at the Oxford meeting of the British Association in 1860. In the second entry, …
  • of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his
  • emotion (see letters from F. J. Wedgwood to H. E. and C. R. Darwin, [186772],  letter   nos. 7058
  • period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the
  • University Library. Henrietta Darwin | March 1871 1871 MarchSea Grove
  • when I feel my day made bright & happy by one short letter. I want him to take me in his arms
  • 13 Katherine Euphemia Wedgwood . 14 Hope Elizabeth Wedgwood . …

Fake Darwin: myths and misconceptions

Summary

Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive ones, with full debunking below...

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Many myths have persisted about Darwin's life and work. Here are a few of the more pervasive …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 17 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If
  • he ought to do what I am doing pester them with letters.’ Darwin was certainly true to his word. The
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • in satisfying female preference in the mating process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, …
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • and his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • as well say, he would drink a little and not too much’ ( letter to Albert Günther, 15 May [1868] ) …
  • in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing gave Darwin much vexation. ‘My book is
  • would be a great loss to the Book’. But Darwins angry letter to Murray crossed one from Dallas to
  • of labour to remuneration I shall look rather blank’ ( letter from W. S. Dallas, 8 January 1868 ). …
  • if I try to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). …
  • reviews. On 7 August 1868 , he wrote him a lengthy letter from the Isle of Wight on the formation
  • would strike me in the face, but not behind my back’ ( letter to John Murray, 25 February [1868] ) …
  • ignorant article… . It is a disgrace to the paper’ ( letter from A. R. Wallace, 24 February [1868] …
  • Edmund Langton wrote from the south of France to Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood on 9 Novembe r, …
  • Africa, Darwin received from Hooker an account by Mary Elizabeth Barber of local variations in the

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

‘My heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old Shrewsbury friend Henry Johnson on 14 November 1880. Darwin became fully devoted to earthworms in the spring of the year, just after finishing the manuscript of…

Matches: 16 hits

  • heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • Erasmuss life and other bits of family history. On 1 January , a distant cousin, Charles
  • my grandfathers character is of much value to me’ ( letter to C. H. Tindal, 5 January 1880 ). …
  • have influenced the whole Kingdom, & even the world’ ( letter from J. L. Chester, 3 March 1880
  • of [William Alvey Darwin],’ George wrote on 28 May 1880 , ‘Isaid you were anxious not to
  • delighted to find an ordinary mortal who could laugh’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin to Charles and
  • he had written for the German journal Kosmos in February 1879, an issue produced in honour of
  • much powder & shot’ ( Correspondence vol. 27, letter from Ernst Krause, 7 June 1879 , and
  • modified; but now I much regret that I did not do so’ ( letter to Samuel Butler, 3 January 1880 ). …
  • anddecided on laying the matter before the public’ ( letter from Samuel Butler, 21 January 1880
  • for the Wedgwood nieces. Later in the year, Emmas sister Elizabeth Wedgwood died at her home, …

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 13 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • many blessings, was finding old agea dismal time’ ( letter to Henry Johnson, 24 September 1879 ) …
  • wrinkles one all over like a baked pear’ ( enclosure in letter from R. W. Dixon, 20 December 1879
  • itself, or gone some other way round?’ At least the last letter of 1879 contained a warmer note and
  • office to complete Horaces marriage settlement ( letter from W. M. Hacon, 31 December 1879 ). …
  • but they wereas nice and good as could be’ ( letter from Karl Beger, [ c. 12 February 1879] ) …
  • on your lifes work, which is crowned with glory’ ( letter from Ernst Haeckel, 9 February 1879 ). …
  • to wish Darwin along and serene evening of life’. This letter crossed with one from Darwin, …
  • Darwin, 28 May [1879] ). On the Galton side of the family, Elizabeth Anne Wheler, who was pleased
  • In August, Bernard accompanied his grandparents, Aunt Elizabeth (Bessy) Darwin, and Henrietta and

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 15 hits

  • The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • been the naturalist and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a
  • be done by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August
  • pleasures of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such
  • Andone looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). …
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • was an illusory hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] …
  • inferred that he was well from his silence on the matter ( letter from Ernst Haeckel, 26 October
  • in such rubbish’, he confided to Joseph Dalton Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18 January [1874] …
  • that Mr Williams wasa cheat and an imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). …
  • his, ‘& that he was thus free to perform his antics’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 29 January [1874
  • Darwin had alloweda spirit séanceat his home ( letter from T. G. Appleton, 2 April 1874 ). …
  • edition, published in 1842 ( Correspondence  vol. 21, letter to Smith, Elder & Co., 17
  • letter John Murray, 9 May [1874] ). He communicated Mary Elizabeth Barbers paper on the pupae of

Earthworms

Summary

As with many of Darwin’s research topics, his interest in worms spanned nearly his entire working life. Some of his earliest correspondence about earthworms was written and received in the 1830s, shortly after his return from his Beagle voyage, and his…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … Earthworms and Wedgwood cousins As with many of Darwin's research topics, his …
  • … about worms were written only months before he died in March 1882. In the same way that Darwin cast …
  • … his nieces, Lucy and Sophy Wedgwood, the daughters of Emma Darwin's brother Josiah. Darwin …
  • … Scientific evidence for the history of life Darwin chose to study earthworms in order to …
  • … by natural selection. His book Fertilisation of Orchids (1862) was Darwin's "flank …
  • … (be it geology or evolutionary theory) was a subject that Darwin had contemplated from his earliest …
  • … In his reply of two days later, Darwin wrote, “Your letter & facts are quite splendid.—I cannot …
  • … request, and his gratitude for her observations. Letter 12745 - Darwin to Sophy …
  • … such a case as grass roots, weeds, in a gravel path.” [ Letter 12760 , 15 October 1880] …
  • … her interest in earthworms and its significance. Letter 13632 - Darwin to John …

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 19 hits

  • Charles Darwins observations on the development of his children,[1began the research that
  • races, lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect
  • the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwins notes reveals, he closely
  • William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are
  • The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwins character clearly perceived by Emma during
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6For in these notes, Darwins deep scientific curiosity transcends his
  • that on occasion he refers to William asit’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate
  • memories.[8Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwins scientific goal, the notes here
  • development from the day of his birth, 27 December 1839, until September 1844. Parallels in the
  • had increased by five: George Howard, born 9 July 1845; Elizabeth, born 8 July 1847; Francis, born
  • our door N o  12 and N o  11 is in the slit for the Letter box.— he decidedly ran past N o  11
  • has learned them from my sometimes changing the first letter in any word he is usingthus I say
  • 35  & to take a crust, when their pudding was finished.— Elizabeth[45remarked him careful
  • flower garden perceived them, said they were not Dzivers (Elizabeths) flowers. ie were not natural
  • very contradictory; by mistake he one day graciously gave Elizabeth a kiss, but repenting said
  • … , pp. 1312. [6Correspondence  vol. 2, letter from Emma Wedgwood, [23 January 1839] . …
  • to Anne and Henrietta were added considerably later; Anne Elizabeth was born in 1841 and Henrietta
  • by Emma Darwin. [29Caroline Sarah Wedgwood, Elizabeth (Bessy) Wedgwood, and Josiah Wedgwood
  • by CD or Emma Darwin. It is perhaps in the hand of Sarah Elizabeth (Elizabeth) Wedgwood who, …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 22 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he
  • to read in Notebook C ( Notebooks , pp. 31928). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • A previous transcript of the reading notebooks (Vorzimmer 1977) included only theBooks Read’ …
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • … [Reimarius 1760] The Highlands & Western Isl ds  letter to Sir W Scott [MacCulloch 1824
  • 183440]: In Portfolio ofabstracts34  —letter from Skuckard of books on Silk Worm
  • M rs  Frys Life [Fry 1847] Horace Walpoles letter to C t . of Ossory [Walpole 1848] …
  • Asiatic Society ]—contains very little Macleays letter to D r  Fleming [Macleay 1830] …
  • th . Humes Hist of England [Hume 1763]. to beginning of Elizabeth. Sept 14 th . 4 first
  • … [Heer 1854].— Hooker has it.— Very important Hookers letter Jan. 1859 Yules Ava [Yule 1858] …
  • of the material from these portfolios is in DAR 205, the letter from William Edward Shuckard to
  • on chemistry (Liebig 1851). 50  Probably Elizabeth Wedgwood. 51  This
  • … ( Notebooks , pp. 31928). 55  The letter was addressed to Nicholas Aylward Vigors
  • of the   Devereux, Earls of Essex, in the reigns of Elizabeth, James I.,   and Charles I., 1540
  • of England from the   fall of Wolsey to the death of Elizabeth.  12 vols. London. 185670128: …
  • …  London.  *119: 21v., 22; 119: 19a Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn. 1857The life of
  • by Mr. Boyer. London. [Other eds.] 119: 22b Gray, Elizabeth Caroline. 1840Tour to the

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 10 hits

  • and colonial authorities. In the nineteenth-century, letter writing was one of the most important
  • when strong institutional structures were largely absent. Darwin had a small circle of scientific
  • in times of uncertainty, controversy, or personal loss. Letter writing was not only a means of
  • section contains two sets of letters. The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. …
  • and he is curious about Hookers thoughts. Letter 729Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., …
  • to Hookerit is like confessing a murder”. Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D. …
  • wide-ranging genera. Darwin and Gray Letter 1674Darwin, C. R. to Gray, …
  • sends a list of plants from Grays Manual of botany [1848] and asks him to append the ranges of
  • and relationships of alpine flora in the USA. Letter 2125Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, …
  • In this letter, naturalist, artist, and writer Mary Elizabeth Barber replies to Queries on

Volume appendices

Summary

Here is a list of the appendices from the print volumes of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin with links to adapted online versions where they are available. Appendix I in each volume contains translations of letters in foreign languages and these can…

Matches: 16 hits

  • from the print volumes of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin with links to adapted online
  • and these can be accessed online by searching for a letter and clicking on the translation tab on
  • …   1 II Darwins Beagle records
  • 1 V Darwins early notes on coral reef formation
  • 2 IV Darwins notes on marriage 2 V
  • 2 VI Darwin and William Kemp on the vitality of seeds
  • 3 III Darwins notes arising from conversations with Joseph Dalton Hooker
  • 4 II Darwins study of the Cirripedia 4
  • 5 II Death of Anne Elizabeth Darwin   …
  • 6 III Dates of composition of Darwins manuscript on species
  • 7 III Abstract of Darwins species theory
  • 7 V Death of Charles Waring Darwin 7 VI
  • 8 V Patrick Matthew's letter to the GardenersChronicle
  • 9 V Correspondence between Erasmus Darwin and Josiah Wedgwood I, concerning
  • 9 X Darwin's memoir of John Stevens Henslow
  • 10 IX Diplomas presented to Charles Darwin   …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 22 hits

  • At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition
  • had surfaced since the fourth edition appeared at the end of 1866 and had told his cousin William
  • … & I am sick of correcting’ ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to W. D. Fox, 12 December [1868
  • Well it is a beginning, & that is something’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 January 1869] ). …
  • material on emotional expression. Yet the scope of Darwins interests remained extremely broad, and
  • plants, and earthworms, subjects that had exercised Darwin for decades, and that would continue to
  • Carl von  Nägeli and perfectibility Darwins most substantial addition to  Origin  was a
  • Nägeli, a Swiss botanist and professor at Munich (Nägeli 1865). Darwin had considered Nägelis paper
  • principal engine of change in the development of species. Darwin correctly assessed Nägelis theory
  • reassess their support for natural selection (see Cittadino 1990, pp. 1223, 12830). Nägeli
  • in most morphological features (Nägeli 1865, p. 29). Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now
  • made any blunders, as is very likely to be the case’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January 1869 ). …
  • are & must be morphological’. The comment highlights Darwins apparent confusion about Nägelis
  • … ‘purely morphological’. The modern reader may well share Darwins uncertainty, but Nägeli evidently
  • pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide Darwin with botanical examples he could use
  • than I now see is possible or probable’ (see also letter to A. R. Wallace, 22 January [1869] , …
  • is strengthened by the facts in distribution’ ( letter to James Croll, 31 January [1869] ). Darwin
  • tropical species using Crolls theory. In the same letter to Croll, Darwin had expressed
  • a very long period  before  the Cambrian formation’ ( letter to James Croll31 January [1869] …
  • data to go by, but dont think we have got that yet’ ( letter from James Croll, 4 February 1869 ). …
  • I d  have been less deferential towards [Thomson]’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 19 March [1869] ). …
  • completed revisions of theeverlasting old Origin’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 1 June [1869] ), he was

Darwin in letters, 1865: Delays and disappointments

Summary

The year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend and supporter; Robert FitzRoy, captain of the Beagle; and William Jackson Hooker, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and father of Darwin’s friend…

Matches: 20 hits

  • In 1865, the chief work on Charles Darwins mind was the writing of  The
  • However, several smaller projects came to fruition in 1865, including the publication of his long
  • letters on climbing plants to make another paper. Darwin also submitted a manuscript of his
  • protégé, John Scott, who was now working in India. Darwins transmutation theory continued to
  • Argyll, appeared in the religious weeklyGood Words . Darwin received news of an exchange of
  • Butler, and, according to Butler, the bishop of Wellington. Darwins theory was discussed at an
  • in the  GardenersChronicleAt the end of the year, Darwin was elected an honorary member of
  • year was marked by three deaths of personal significance to Darwin: Hugh Falconer, a friend of
  • The death of Hugh Falconer Darwins first letter to Hooker of 1865 suggests that the family
  • having all the Boys at home: they make the house jolly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] …
  • for the Copley Medal of the Royal Society of London in 1864, had staunchly supported his candidacy, …
  • to accept the award in person (see  Correspondence  vol. 12). In early January Falconer had
  • had failed to include among the grounds of the award ( see letter from Hugh Falconer to Erasmus
  • may well rest content that I have not laboured in vain’ ( letter to Hugh Falconer, 6 January [1865] …
  • always a most kind friend to me. So the world goes.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 2 February [1865] …
  • for our griefs & pains: these alone are unalloyed’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 3 February 1865
  • gas.— Sic transit gloria mundi, with a vengeance’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1865] ). …
  • added, ‘I know it is folly & nonsense to try anyone’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 7 January [1865] …
  • ineffective, and Darwin had given it up by early July ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [10 July 1865] …
  • Wales rented by the Hensleigh Wedgwoods for the summer, and Elizabeth was evidently attending school

Science: A Man’s World?

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth-century women participated in the world of science, be it as experimenters, observers, editors, critics, producers, or consumers. Despite this, much of the…

Matches: 13 hits

  • Discussion Questions | Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth
  • … . Discussion Questions 1. What sorts of scientific participation
  • Letters Darwins Notes On Marriage [April - July 1838] In these notes, …
  • theories, & accumulating facts in silence & solitude”. Darwin also comments that he has
  • an hourwith poor Mrs. Lyell sitting by”. Letter 3715 - Claparède, J. L. R. A. E. to
  • whose attractions are not those of her sex”. Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [12-13
  • her own steam and is afirst rate critic”. Letter 4377 - Haeckel, E. P. A. to Darwin, …
  • ornaments in the making of feminine works”. Letter 4441 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [30
  • the young, especially ladies, to study nature. Letter 4940 - Cresy, E. to Darwin, E., …
  • Anderson isneither masculine nor pedantic”. Letter 6976 - Darwin to Blackwell, A. B., …
  • to him as a published science author, is a man. Letter 7314 - Kovalevsky, S. to Darwin, …
  • Theoriae Functionum Ellipticarum , (1829). Letter 7329 - Murray, J. to Darwin, [28
  • to prick up what little is left of them ears”. Letter 8055 - Hennell, S. S. to Darwin, …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 16 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of
  • and also a meeting with Herbert Spencer, who was visiting Darwins neighbour, Sir John Lubbock. In
  • Pound foolish, Penurious, Pragmatical Prigs’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [29 December 1866] ). But
  • …  ( Variation ). Although it was not published until 1868, all but the concluding chapter of the
  • hypothesis of hereditary transmission. Debate about Darwins theory of transmutation
  • alleged evidence of a global ice age, while Asa Gray pressed Darwins American publisher for a
  • … & what is delightful, I am able to write easy work for about 1½ hours every day’ ( letter to H. …
  • of coffee to two cups a day, since coffee, with the10 drops of Muriatic acid twice a day (with
  • once daily to make the chemistry go on better’ ( letter from H. B. Jones, 10 February [1866] ). …
  • see you out with our beagles before the season is over’ ( letter from John Lubbock, 4 August 1866
  • work doing me any harmany how I cant be idle’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 24 August [1866] ). …
  • production of which Tegetmeier had agreed to supervise ( letter to W. B. Tegetmeier, 16 January
  • ofDomestic Animals & Cult. Plantsto Printers’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1866] …
  • good deal I think, & have come to more definite views’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 22 December
  • … ‘I quite follow you in thinking Agassiz glacier-mad’ ( letter to Charles Lyell, 8[–9] September
  • Agassizs views through a letter to Lyells wife, Mary Elizabeth Lyell, from Elizabeth Cabot Cary

Darwin's health

Summary

On 28 March 1849, ten years before Origin was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker from Great Malvern in Worcestershire, where Dr James Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to…

Matches: 13 hits

  • On 28 March 1849, ten years before  Origin  was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph
  • Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to
  • I was rapidly going the way of all fleshSee the letter At various periods in his
  • headaches, fatigue, trembling, faintness, and dizziness. In 1849, Darwins symptoms became so severe
  • for three months while he took Dr Gullys water cure. In Darwins letter to Hooker, he described Dr
  • a wet compress all day on my stomach. I eat simply, dine at 1 oclock & take several short walks
  • certain that the Water Cure is no quackery.—  See the letter After returning from
  • as my retching is apt to be extremely loud.—  See the letter Besides experimenting
  • Edward Wickstead Lane, and at Ilkley with Dr Edmund Smith, Darwin sought advice from his consulting
  • of a fashionable spinal ice treatment. In April 1864, Darwin attributed his improved health to Dr
  • the vomiting wonderfully & I am gaining vigour .’ (letter to JDHooker, 13 April [1864] ) …
  • these grounds (see, for example, Correspondence vol. 2, letter to J. S. Henslow, 14 October
  • 1829] , and Correspondence vol. 2, letter to Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood, [28 August 1837] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 20 hits

  • On 14