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Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 26 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect
  • ease of distribution sometime in late 1867 or early 1868. Darwin went over his questions, refining
  • was the collection of observations on a global scale. Darwin was especially interested in peoples
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such
  • the collection of information to its display in print. After Darwin received all of the replies to
  • exceptyesorno.” “The same state of mindDarwin would later assert in Expression of the
  • uniformity.” Table of Correspondence about Darwins Questionnaire (click on the letter
  • could available online ahead of schedule as part of theDarwin and Human Natureproject, funded by
  • Southampton, England letter to W.E. Darwin shrugging/pouting of
  • blushing Darwin, Francis 20 June 1867
  • Bartlett and S. Sutton Darwin, Francis
  • pouting Darwin, W.E. [after 29 March 1868] …
  • blushing in blind students Darwin, W.E. [7
  • blushing Darwin, W.E. [22? April 1868] …
  • Ceylon enclosed in letter from G.H.K. Thwaites
  • Gray, Asa 9 May [1869] [Alexandria, Egypt] …
  • Gray, Jane 9 May [1869] [Alexandria, Egypt] …
  • Gray, Asa 8 & 9 May 1869 Florence, Italy (about
  • will forward query Huxley, H.A. 22 Mar
  • Aborigines Lane, H.B. 13 Aug 1868
  • aborigines Lubbock, E.F. [1867-8?] …
  • aborigines Thwaites, G.H.K. 1 Apr 1868
  • Kanara), Bombay, India forwarded by H.N.B. Erskine

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 21 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • a holiday in the Lake District in August did little to raise Darwins spirits. ‘I wish that my
  • W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] ). From July, Darwin had an additional worry: the
  • which is crowned with glory’ ( letter from Ernst Haeckel, 9 February 1879 ). The botanist and
  • … & would please Francis’, he pointed out ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 13 March [1879 ]). …
  • with the when & the where, & the who—’ ( letter from V. H. Darwin, 28 May [1879] ). On the
  • thoughtperfect in every way’ ( letter from E. A. Wheler, 25 March 1879 ). She suggested that
  • … ). Darwin welcomed Krauses suggestion, but warned him on 9 June not toexpend much powder & …
  • and well, and with little fatigue’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 12 July 1879 , and letter from
  • to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 5 June 1879 , and letter to G. H. Darwin, 12 July 1879 ). Darwins
  • … … neither cross nor ennuied’ (Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [4 August 1879] (DAR 219.1: 125)). Darwin
  • wait for three months. ‘Nothing can be more useless than T.Hs conduct’, Emma Darwin pointed out, …
  • say that he has opposed it’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [4 August 1879] (DAR 219.1: …
  • to get home ‘& began drumming at once’ (Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [27 August 1879] (DAR
  • … & I may not be equal to the exertion’ ( letter to H. A. Pitman, [13 May 1879] ). In the end, …
  • because it dominated the picture (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [17 July 1879] (DAR
  • men of science quarrelled (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [6 September 1879] (DAR 219.1: …
  • to their engagement being made public ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 12 October 1879 ). Darwins

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 26 hits

  • …   On 6 March 1868, Darwin wrote to the entomologist and accountant John Jenner Weir, ‘If any
  • he ought to do what I am doing pester them with letters.’ Darwin was certainly true to his word. The
  • and sexual selection. In  Origin , pp. 8790, Darwin had briefly introduced the concept of
  • process. In a letter to Alfred Russel Wallace in 1864, Darwin claimed that sexual selection wasthe
  • 12, letter to A. R. Wallace, 28 [May 1864] ). Darwins theory of sexual selection as
  • to the stridulation of crickets. At the same time, Darwin continued to collect material on
  • his immediate circle of friends and relations. In July 1868 Darwin was still anticipating that his
  • which was devoted to sexual selection in the animal kingdom. Darwin described his thirst for
  • in January 1868. A final delay caused by the indexing gave Darwin much vexation. ‘My book is
  • 1867 and had expected to complete it in a fortnight. But at Darwins request, he modified his
  • the text. This increased the amount of work substantially. Darwin asked Murray to intervene, …
  • … … though it would be a great loss to the Book’. But Darwins angry letter to Murray crossed one from
  • blank’ ( letter from W. S. Dallas, 8 January 1868 ). Darwin sympathised, replying on 14 January
  • as stone, if it were not quite mollified by your note’. Darwin enclosed a cheque to Dallas for £55  …
  • classes, a dim ray of light may be gained’ ( letter to H. T. Stainton, 21 February [1868] ). From
  • on the auditory organs of Orthoptera and Coleoptera on 9 September . Darwin annotated a letter
  • from the south of France to Sarah Elizabeth Wedgwood on 9 Novembe r, describing sphinx moths that
  • direct result of natural selection ( Variation  2: 1859). Wallace seized upon this point in a
  • and had himself watched elephants cry (letters to W. E. Darwin, [15 March 1868] and 8 April
  • Katherine ( letter from C. M. Hawkshaw to Emma Darwin, 9 February [1868] ). Darwins eldest son, …
  • from Fritz Müller, 22 April 1868 , 17 June 1868 , 9 September 1868 , and 31 October 1868
  • of the caudicle of  Ophrys muscifera  (letters from T. H. Farrer, 17 May 1868 and 18 May
  • to oneselfis no slight gain’ ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 17 September 1868 ). Darwin continued
  • induced him to stay away ( letter from S. J. OH. Horsman, 2 June [1868] ). But if Horsman
  • A different order of pride was expressed on 9 November by Ernst Haeckel on the birth of his son
  • at the shrine of D r . Darwin’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 20 July 1868 ). Darwin received a

Darwin in letters, 1881: Old friends and new admirers

Summary

In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began writing about all the eminent men he had met. He embarked on this task, which formed an addition to his autobiography, because he had nothing else to do. He had…

Matches: 21 hits

  • In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began
  • a very old man, who probably will not last much longer.’ Darwins biggest fear was not death, but
  • sweetest place on this earth’. From the start of the year, Darwin had his demise on his mind. He
  • provision for the dividing of his wealth after his death. Darwins gloominess was compounded by the
  • and new admirers got in touch, and, for all his fears, Darwin found several scientific topics to
  • Evolution old and new when revising his essay on Erasmus Darwins scientific work, and that Darwin
  • memory in November 1880 and in an abusive letter about Darwin in the St Jamess Gazette on 8
  • in a review of Unconscious memory in Kosmos and sent Darwin a separate letter for
  • decided to print500 more, making 2000’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 January 1881 ). Unlike
  • very surprising the whole case is to me’ (letters to W. E. Darwin, 31 January [1881] and 19
  • learn from experience, Darwin was wary, telling Romanes on 9 March , ‘I intend to have another
  • but I cannot endure to do this’, Darwin told Francis on 9 Novemberand writing to Fritz
  • with you’, a Swedish teacher told him ( letter from C. E. Södling, 14 October 1881 ), while H. M. …
  • little, to the general stock of knowledge’ ( letter to E. W. Bok, 10 May 1881 ). Josef Popper, an
  • … ( Correspondence vol. 30, letter to C. A. Kennard, 9 January 1882 ). ‘I
  • in heavenwhen the portrait was finished ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 23 July 1881 ). ‘All my family
  • absurd for one with no pretensions’ (l etter from W. E. Darwin, 13 January [1881 ]), Darwin
  • after expressing their wish to visit Darwin ( letter from E. B. Aveling, 27 September [1881] ). …
  • who had received presentation copies. Galton wrote on 9 October , ‘I wish the worms were not such
  • of letters about worms’, he told Francis Darwin on 9 November , ‘but amidst much rubbish there
  • … ( letter to Francis Darwin, 28 [October 1881] ). On 9 November, Darwin told Francis , ‘I have

Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 25 hits

  • indicates, 1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his
  • promotion of his theory of natural selection also continued: Darwins own works expanded on it, …
  • a keen interest in the progress of his views through Europe, Darwin negotiated, in addition to a
  • the family over the summer. But towards the end of the year, Darwin was able once more to turn his
  • of the Scottish press hissed). Huxley, while advocating Darwins theory, had again espoused the view
  • experimental production of newphysiologicalspecies. Darwin attempted to dissuade him from this
  • together. He failed. Huxley replied ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 20 January 1862 ): 'I
  • delivered a series of lectures to working men that reviewed Darwins theory, and sent copies to
  • their difference of opinion, but complained ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 28 December [1862] ): &#039
  • … (‘Dimorphic condition in  Primula ’, p. 92 ( Collected papers  2: 59)). Darwin later recalled: …
  • excited Darwin, who exclaimed to Gray ( letter to Asa Gray, 9 August [1862] ), ‘I am almost stark
  • … , whether the Book will sell’ ( letter to John Murray, 9 [February 1862] ). To his son, William, …
  • withgood dashes of original reflexions’ ( letter to H. W. Bates, 13 January [1862] ). He warmly
  • … & admirable papers I ever read in my life’ ( letter to H. W. Bates, 20 November [1862] ). He
  • French Translation will appear very soon’ ( letter to C. E. Brown-Séquard, 2 January [1862] ). …
  • telling him of the need for a second edition ( letter from H. G. Bronn, [before 11 March 1862] ), …
  • Bronn died suddenly from a heart attack ( see letter from E. Schweizerbartsche Verlagsbuchhandlung
  • and Emmaperplexed to death what to do’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, [23 August 1862] ). They
  • better funthan species ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 February [1862] ), he responded to the
  • byparticularly active young wolves’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 9 October 1862 ). Darwin
  • to read any paper or speak’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 9 [April 1862] ). A visit in October from
  • me go away for an hour after dinner & retire to my room at 9 o clock I do not think it would
  • work would make his lifemuch happier’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 14 February [1862] ). Darwin
  • insects with Darwins hypothesis ( see letter from H. W. Bates, 30 April 1862 ), Darwin was
  • as true as gospel, so it must be true’ ( to J. D. Hooker, 9 May [1862] ). the real

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 22 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • officinalis . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] …
  • Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May 1869] Jane Loring Gray, …
  • birds. Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., [30 January 1868] Darwin
  • Letter 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] …
  • Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] Anne Jane Cupples, …
  • her nieces ears. Letter 8701 - Lubbock, E. F . to Darwin, [1873] Ellen
  • with fly-catching Drosera . Letter 9426 - Story-Maskelyne , T. M. to
  • the birds attacking the buds and flowers. Letter 9616 - Marshall, T. to Darwin, …
  • insects. Men: Letter 2221 - Blyth, E. to Darwin, [22 February 1858] …
  • patience”. Letter 4242 - Hildebrand, F. H. G. to Darwin, [16 July 1863] …
  • New Zealand. Letter 6453 - Langton, E. to Wedgwood, S. E., [9 November 1868] …
  • 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9 November 1868] Darwins
  • Women: Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] …
  • Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Leith Hill Place. Letter 6139  - Doubleday, H. to Darwin, [22 April 1868] …
  • Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] Amy Ruck reports the
  • she hasdug some more trenches”. Letter 9606 - Harrison, L. C. to Darwin, …
  • which are carefully packed in a tin box. Letter 9616  - Marshall, Tto Darwin, …

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

‘My heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old Shrewsbury friend Henry Johnson on 14 November 1880. Darwin became fully devoted to earthworms in the spring of the year, just after finishing the manuscript of…

Matches: 24 hits

  • heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • Financial support for science was a recurring issue, as Darwin tried to secure a Civil List pension
  • with Samuel Butler, prompted by the publication of Erasmus Darwin the previous year. …
  • Charles Harrison Tindal, sent a cache of letters from two of Darwins grandfathers clerical friends
  • divines to see a pigs body opened is very amusing’, Darwin replied, ‘& that about my
  • find an ordinary mortal who could laugh’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin to Charles and Emma Darwin, 22
  • Ernst Krause, 7 June 1879 , and letter to Ernst Krause, 9 June [1879] ). The final text of the
  • a grievance to hang an article upon’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [28 January 1880] ). …
  • … , sending one or both to his daughter Henrietta ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 1 February [1880] ). …
  • he will have the last word’, she warned ( letter from H. E. Litchfield, [1 February 1880] ). ‘He
  • Darwinophobia? It is a horrid disease’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 February 1880 ). All
  • inflated to an elephant’ ( letter from Ernst Krause, 9 December 1880 ). Again, Darwin felt
  • I was, also, rarely fit to see anybody’ ( letter to S. H. Haliburton, 13 December 1880 ). …
  • thus one looks to prevent its return’ ( letter from J.-H. Fabre, 18 February 1880 ). Darwin shared
  • aided in any way direct attacks on religion’ ( letter to E. B. Aveling, 13 October 1880 ). Finally
  • biologist of our time’ ( letter from W. D. Roebuck to G. H. Darwin, 25 October 1880 ). The
  • 21 years since the Origin appeared”‘ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 11 [April] 1880 ). While praising
  • been developed through natural selection’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 11 May 1880 ). Worthy
  • the success of our efforts’ ( letter to A. B. Buckley, 9 November 1880 ). He worked with Huxley on
  • prevailing superstitions of this country!’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, [after 26 November 1880] ). …
  • about their party quarrels’ ( letter to James Torbitt, 9 May 1880 ). Politicians grew concerned

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 10 hits

  • Charles Darwins daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and
  • 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University
  • excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwins letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwins own discussion of religious belief in
  • of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his
  • one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and
  • period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the
  • if I be Iit seems so strange that my life & his 9 are trembling now in the balance &amp
  • I think I am a very happy woman. Sunday July 9 th . 1871 I want to think why I shd
  • identified. 8 Thomas Henry Huxley . 9 Richard Buckley Litchfield . …

Books on the Beagle

Summary

The Beagle was a sort of floating library.  Find out what Darwin and his shipmates read here.

Matches: 21 hits

  • … the  Narrative  (2: 18). CD, in his letter to Henslow, 9 [September 1831] , discussing the …
  • … from the unpublished zoological and geological notes in the Darwin Archive (DAR 29–38), a brief …
  • … is of four kinds: There are volumes now in the Darwin Library in Cambridge that contain …
  • … notes made by CD during the voyage. They are in the Darwin Archive in the Cambridge University …
  • … and symbols are used: DAR  —  Darwin Archive CUL  —  Cambridge University …
  • … , conveys the following information: CD’s copy, now in Darwin Libary–CUL, was used on board. The …
  • … 1 of volume 32 of CD’s geological diary (DAR 32.1) in the Darwin Archive. The copy in the Darwin …
  • … . 2 vols. Strasbourg, 1819. (Inscription in vol. 1: ‘C. Darwin HMS Beagle’; DAR 32.1: 61). Darwin …
  • … 26, 27, 28 . London, 1831. (DAR 31.1: 276v.; 33: 253v.). Darwin Library–CUL, 1832 Philadelphia …
  • … Zoologie . Paris, 1816–30. (DAR 30.1: 6, 12v.). Darwin Library–CUL. § Blainville, Henri …
  • … 2 vols. Paris, 1828. (Inscription in vol. 2: ‘Charles Darwin Rio Plata Aug 7 th . 1832’). Darwin …
  • … (Letter from J. S. Henslow, 15–21 January [1833]). Darwin Library–CUL. § Bougainville, Louis …
  • … Charles Whitley, 23 July 1834). ‘Philosophical tracts’, Darwin Library–CUL. §  British …
  • … 26–35. (DAR 35.2: 396). ‘Philosophical tracts’, Darwin Library–CUL ††. ‡ Buch, Leopold von.  …
  • … . . . by Robert Jameson.  London, 1813. (DAR 30.2: 154). Darwin Library–CUL. Bulkeley, John …
  • … 1822–4. ( Voyage , p. 182;  Red notebook , p. 86). Darwin Library–Down †. Byron, George …
  • … ofEngland and Wales.  Pt 1. London, 1822. (DAR 35.1: 317). Darwin Library–Down. Cook, James. …
  • … Le règne animal.  4 vols. Paris, 1817. (DAR 30.1: 29v.). Darwin Library–CUL, 2d edition, 5 vols., …
  • … Desaulses de.  Voyage autour du monde . . . 1817–20.  9 vols., 4 vols. plates, Paris, 1824–44. …
  • … *  New Testament  (German). (Signed ‘C. Darwin H.M.S. Beagle’. Copy examined by Sydney Smith  c. …
  • … Vegetabilium] Ed. 15a. Göttingen, 1797. (Letter from E. A. Darwin, 18 August [1832]). Darwin Library …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 25 hits

  • At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  …
  • appeared at the end of 1866 and had told his cousin William Darwin Fox, ‘My work will have to stop a
  • material on emotional expression. Yet the scope of Darwins interests remained extremely broad, and
  • plants, and earthworms, subjects that had exercised Darwin for decades, and that would continue to
  • Carl von  Nägeli and perfectibility Darwins most substantial addition to  Origin  was a
  • a Swiss botanist and professor at Munich (Nägeli 1865). Darwin had considered Nägelis paper
  • principal engine of change in the development of species. Darwin correctly assessed Nägelis theory
  • in most morphological features (Nägeli 1865, p. 29). Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now
  • are & must be morphological’. The comment highlights Darwins apparent confusion about Nägelis
  • … ‘purely morphological’. The modern reader may well share Darwins uncertainty, but Nägeli evidently
  • by his perfectibility principle (Nägeli 1865, pp. 289). In further letters, Hooker tried to provide
  • problems of heredity Another important criticism that Darwin sought to address in the fifth
  • prevailing theory of blending inheritance that Jenkin and Darwin both shared, would tend to be lost
  • … ( Origin  5th ed., pp. 1034). The terminology that Darwin and others employed in these matters ( …
  • … ‘I must have expressed myself atrociously’, Darwin wrote to Alfred Russel Wallace on 2 February , …
  • of  Origin  was the result of correspondence between Darwin and the geologist James Croll. In the
  • but it was his theory of alternate ice ages that piqued Darwins interest the most. He wrote, ‘this
  • been less deferential towards [Thomson]’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 19 March [1869] ). …
  • hatred—’ ( from Asa Gray and J. L. Gray, 8 and 9 May [1869] ). James Crichton-Browne and
  • fossil discoveries in Patagonia and Wales ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 7 May 1869 , letter from W
  • of the soil ( letter to  GardenersChronicle , 9 May [1869] ). In March, Darwin received
  • fools of themselves than they did’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 28 September 1869 ). …
  • whichI do not care to follow him’ ( letter from T. H. Farrer, 9 October 1869 ). Farrer ventured
  • and Will and High Design—’ (letter from T. H. Farrer, 13 October 1869). Darwin was
  • to set foot on summit of a mountain.—’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 9 July [1869] ).  Earlier

Volume 29 (1881) is published!

Summary

In October 1881, Darwin published his last book, The formation of vegetable mould through the action of worms: with observations on their habits. A slim volume on a subject that many people could understand and on which they had their own opinions, it went…

Matches: 9 hits

  • From the start of 1881, Darwin had his demise on his mind. He increasingly relied on his son William
  • provision for the dividing of his wealth after his death. Darwins gloominess was compounded by the
  • and new admirers got in touch, and, for all his fears, Darwin found several scientific topics to
  • the book has been received.    Letter t o Francis Darwin, 9 November [1881] In
  • ABBuckley, 4 January 1881 In January, Darwin heard that his efforts to secure a
  • Arabella Burton Buckley had suggested the possibility, and Darwin, with her help, wrote a memorial
  • spent June in the Lake District, a family holiday which Darwin contemplated with his customary
  • …                               Letter to WEDarwin, 4 August [1881] In early
  • …                       Letter to THFarrer, 28 August 1881 Darwins elder brother

Darwin in letters,1870: Human evolution

Summary

The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the year at work on the Descent of Man & Selection in relation to Sex’.  Descent was the culmination of over three decades of observations and reflections on…

Matches: 23 hits

  • The year 1870 is aptly summarised by the brief entry Darwin made in his journal: ‘The whole of the
  • in relation to Sex’. Always precise in his accounting, Darwin reckoned that he had started writing
  • gathered on each of these topics was far more extensive than Darwin had anticipated. As a result,  …
  • and St George Jackson Mivart, and heated debates sparked by Darwins proposed election to the French
  • Finishing Descent; postponing Expression Darwin began receiving proofs of some of the
  • … ( letter to Albert Günther, 13 January [1870] ). Darwin was still working hard on parts of the
  • of style, the more grateful I shall be’  ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). She had
  • … , the latter when she was just eighteen years of age. Darwin clearly expected her to make a
  • ever have thought that I shd. turn parson?’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). …
  • thing so unimportant as the mind of man!’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [after 8 February 1870] ). …
  • philanthropist Frances Power Cobbe. At Cobbes suggestion, Darwin read some of Immanuel Kants  …
  • … ( letter to F. P. Cobbe, 23 March [1870?] ). Cobbe accused Darwin of smiling in his beard with
  • as animals: ears Despite Cobbes plea, most of Darwins scientific attention in 1870 was
  • … ‘is the bane of existence!’ ( letter to William Ogle, 9 November 1870 ). Researching
  • demons and spirits were white ( letter from W. W. Reade, 9 November 1870 ). Keen for more
  • is to criticise them? No one but yourself’ ( letter from H. W. Bates, 20 May 1870 ). Darwin very
  • able to say that I  never  write reviews’ ( letter to H. W. Bates, [22 May 1870] ). St
  • if I once began to answer objectors’ ( letter to W. H. Flower, 25 March [1870] ). In his letters
  • out seven devils worse than that first!’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 22 June 1870 ). In the
  • highly important for the welfare of mankind’ ( letter to [H. H. Vivian?], [April or May 1870?] ). …
  • dark to me and to every one else I suspect’ ( letter from H. B. Jones, 2 August 1870 ). …
  • attending college lectures for the time being ( letter to [E.W. Blore], [October 1870 or later] ). …
  • to ride the same horse that had thrown him (letter from G. H. Darwin to H. E. Darwin, [212

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 27 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of