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Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 17 hits

  • The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). The death of a
  • and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such reminiscences led Darwin to
  • much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). I feel very old &amp
  • at Erasmuss house. The event was led by the medium Charles E. Williams, and was attended by George
  • friend Joseph Dalton Hooker, and finally borrowed one from Charles Lyell ( letter to Smith, Elder
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • at a much reduced price of nine shillings, in line with Charles Lyells  Students elements of
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • raising £860 ( Circular to John Lubbock, P. L. Sclater, Charles Lyell, W. B. Carpenter, and Michael
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He
  • of the English editions. Darwins French publisher, Charles Reinwald, engaged new translators to
  • connotations of both Huxleys and Tyndalls addresses, Charles Lyell, who had spent his career

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 22 hits

  • 1 Re: DesignAdaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and othersby
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • from the correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, …
  • following: Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the dress
  • Agassiz, Adam Sedgwick, A Friend of John Stuart Mill, Emma Darwin, Horace Darwinand acts as a sort
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles Darwinmade his home on the border
  • the year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a
  • at the expense of Agassiz. DARWIN:   20   Lyell told me, that Agassiz, having a
  • … – to be falseYours most sincerely and gratefully Charles Darwin. CREED AND FEVER: 1858
  • forgetfuless of your darling. BOOKS BY THE LATE CHARLES DARWIN: 1863-1865 In which
  • and officially die. And then publish booksby the late Charles Darwin’. Darwin takes up
  • …   173   Ever yours cordially (though an Englishman) Charles Darwin. GRAY174   …
  • paragraph, in which I quote and differ from you[r178   doctrine that each variation has been
  • at an unexpected and probably transient notorietyCharles Darwin died on the 19th April
  • ARTS AND SCIENCES, PROCEEDINGS XVII, 1882 4  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER 10 MAY 1848
  • DARWIN TO A GRAY, 4 JULY 1858 48  C DARWIN TO LYELL, 18 JUNE 1858 49  C
  • GRAY TO JD HOOKER, 18 FEBRUARY 1861 115 A GRAY TO CHARLES WRIGHT, 17 APRIL 1862
  • TO ASA GRAY 20 APRIL 1863 174 FROM A GRAY TO CHARLES DARWIN, 24 JULY 1865
  • A GRAY 3 AUGUST 1871 201  TO A GRAY 3 JUNE [1874] 202  FROM A GRAY 16

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • community. Here is a selection of letters exchanged between Darwin and his workforce of women
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June 1864] …
  • Egypt. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [8 June 1867 - 72] Darwin
  • Henrietta. Letter 7179 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [5 May 1870] …
  • 9426 - Story-Maskelyne , T. M. to Darwin, [23 April 1874] Thereza Story-Maskelyne
  • Letter 9616 - Marshall, T. to Darwin, [September 1874] Theodosia Marshall sends
  • the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9
  • Letter 1701 - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • in Llandudno. Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] …
  • Letter 8144 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [5 January 1872] Darwin asks his niece, …
  • Lychnis diurna. Letter 8168 - Ruck, A. R . to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] …
  • lawn. Letter 8224 - Darwin to Ruck, A. R., [24 February 1872] Darwin
  • Letter 9606 - Harrison, L. C. to Darwin, [22 August 1874] Darwins niece, Lucy, …
  • Letter 9616  - Marshall, Tto Darwin, [September 1874] Theodosia Marshall details
  • the Isle of White. Letter 4433  - Wright, Charles to Gray, A., [20, 25, 26 March
  • Letter 1701  - Morris, M. H. to Prior, R. C. A., [17 June 1855] Margaretta Hare Morris
  • Letter 9485 - Treat, M. to Darwin, [8 June 1874] Mary Treat details her experiments
  • garden ”. Letter 6083  - Casparay, J. X. R. to Darwin, [2 April 1868] …
  • in the future. Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [12-13 March 1863] …
  • Letter 7858 - Darwin to Wa llace, A. R., [12 July 1871] Darwin tells Wallace that

Darwin in letters, 1882: Nothing too great or too small

Summary

In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous October, and for the first time in decades he was not working on another book. He remained active in botanical research, however. Building on his recent studies in plant…

Matches: 23 hits

  • In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous
  • for scientific colleagues or their widows facing hardship. Darwin had suffered from poor health
  • of his scientific friends quickly organised a campaign for Darwin to have greater public recognition
  • Botanical observation and experiment had long been Darwins greatest scientific pleasure. The year
  • to Fritz Müller, 4 January 1882 ). These were topics that Darwin had been investigating for years, …
  • contents, if immersed for some hours in a weak solution of C. of Ammonia’. Darwins interest in root
  • our homes, would in this case greatly suffer’ ( letter to C. A. Kennard, 9 January 1882 ). Kennard
  • judged, intellectually his inferior, please ( letter from C. A. Kennard, 28 January 1882 ). …
  • to take his daily strolls (Henrietta Emma Litchfield, ‘Charles Darwins death’, DAR 262.23: 2, p. 2) …
  • dull aching in the chest’ (Emma Darwin to G. H. Darwin, [ c . 28 March 1882] (DAR 210.3: 45)). …
  • snakes, centipedes, and spiders. The instructions were from Charles Lawrence Hughes, a fellow pupil
  • to some Estancia,’ wrote Hughes, ‘as the scenery &c. will amply repay your trouble’ ( letter
  • where he had witnessed an earthquake in 1835 ( letter from R. E. Alison, [MarchJuly 1835 ]). …
  • Holland, she mentions his warm reception on arrival: ‘Charles is as well as possible & in gayer
  • recommendations for annual medals. He strongly supported Charles Lyell for the Copley, the Royal
  • that the future Historian of the Natural Sciences, will rank Lyells labours as more influential in
  • point of view I think no man ranks in the same class with Lyell’ ( letter to William Sharpey, 22
  • will be months before I am able to work’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [ c . 10 April 1864] ). To
  • November [1864] ). Writing to the clergyman and naturalist Charles Kingsley, he was more gloomy: …
  • men whom I should have liked to have known’ ( letter to Charles Kingsley, 2 June [1865] ). …
  • curious to read what you will say on Man & his Races’, Lyell wrote. ‘It was not a theme to be
  • theory for the whole of the organic world ( letter from Charles Lyell, 16 July 1867 ). In the same
  • and I must not make you my father confessor. ( Letter from Charles Lyell, 1 September 1874 .) …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 28 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • by H. W. Rutherford ( Catalogue of the library of Charles Darwin now in the Botany School, …
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • Louisiana [darby 1816] & Finch Travels [Finch 1833]. (Lyell) Maximilian in Brazil [Wied
  • of Mexico [W. H. Prescott 1843], strongly recommended by Lyell (read) Berkeleys Works
  • 1844] L d  Cloncurry Memm [Lawless 1849] Lady Lyell Sir J Heads Forest scenes in
  • … [Fellows 1839] Catherine 48 Life of Collins R.A. [Collins 1848] Phases of Faith
  • round world 18036 [Lisyansky 1814]— nothing Lyells Elements of Geology [Lyell 1838] …
  • J 57  Brownes Religio Medici [T. Browne 1643] Lyells Book III 5th Edit 58  [Lyell 1837] …
  • … —— 30 th  Lyells Principles. 3. Vol. 6 th  Edit [Lyell 1840]— references at end.— April 6
  • abstracted 22 d  Lyells Elem. 2 d  Edit. [Lyell 1841] d[itt]o.— Jan 3 d . …
  • 1859]. (goodish) 1  The personal library of Charles Stokes from whom CD borrowed books
  • Erskine. 2 vols. London.  *119: 14 Babington, Charles Cardale. 1839Primitiæ floræ   …
  • of Useful Knowledge.) London.  *119: 13 Badham, Charles David. 1845Insect life . …
  • … [Abstract in DAR 205.3: 180.] 119: 21a Bell, Charles. 1806Essays on the anatomy of
  • design . (Bridgewater Treatise no. 4.) London. [9th ed. (1874) in Darwin Library.]  119: 5a
  • of the London Clay . London.  *119: 12v. Brace, Charles Loring. 1852Hungary in 1851: …
  • life from 1838 to the present   time . Edited by John Charles Templer. 3 vols. London128: 9
  • … . 3 vols. Edinburgh and London128: 25 Bunbury, Charles James Fox. 1848Journal of a
  • nature of virtue . Cambridge.  *119: 13 Buxton, Charles. 1848Memoirs of Sir Thomas
  • 1848Memoirs of the life of William   Collins, Esq., R.A.  2 vols. London.  *119: 23; 119: …
  • by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of John Hunter, F.R.S. with notes . Edited by James F. …
  • Robert. 1843Memoirs of the life of John   Constable, R.A., composed chiefly of his letters. …

Bibliography of Darwin’s geological publications

Summary

This list includes papers read by Darwin to the Geological Society of London, his books on the geology of the Beagle voyage, and other publications on geological topics.  Author-date citations refer to entries in the Darwin Correspondence Project’s…

Matches: 14 hits

  • This list includes papers read by Darwin to the Geological Society of London, his books on the
  • topicsAuthor-date citations refer to entries in the Darwin Correspondence Projects cumulative
  • are given to reprints available in John van Wyhe ed.,  Charles Darwins shorter publications, 1829
  • numbers refer to R. B. Freemans standard bibliography of Darwins works. —Extracts from
  • of His Majestys Ship Beagle, commanded by Capt. FitzRoy, R.NProceedings of the Geological
  • of Capt. FitzRoy RN, during the years 1832 to 1836 . By Charles Darwin. London: Smith, Elder & …
  • … —Remarks on the preceding paper, in a letter from Charles Darwin, Esq., to Mr. Maclaren. Edinburgh
  • of Capt. FitzRoy RN, during the years 1832 to 1836.  By Charles Darwin. London: Smith, Elder & …
  • of Capt. FitzRoy RN, during the years 1832 to 1836By Charles Darwin. London: Smith, Elder & …
  • … — The structure and distribution of coral reefs . By Charles Darwin. Revised edition. London: …
  • by James Geikie, pp. 141-2. AlsoLife and letters of Charles Darwin , edited by Francis Darwin, …
  • work in geology: Herbert, Sandra. 2005Charles Darwin, geologist.  Ithaca, NY: Cornell
  • History of Science  24: 13357. Stoddart, David R. 1976. Darwin, Lyell, and the geological
  • On the history of geology: Greene, Mott C. 1982Geology in the nineteenth century . …

Before Origin: the ‘big book’

Summary

Darwin began ‘sorting notes for Species Theory’ on 9 September 1854, the very day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles (Darwin's Journal). He had long considered the question of species. In 1842, he outlined a theory of transmutation in a…

Matches: 19 hits

  • Darwin begansorting notes for Species Theoryon 9 September 1854, the
  • day he concluded his eight-year study of barnacles ( Darwin's Journal ). He had long
  • to paper in a more substantial essay. By this point, Darwin had also admitted to his close friend
  • he acknowledged, ‘ like confessing a murder ’. While Darwin recognised he had far more work to do
  • reaction to the transmutation theory it contained convinced Darwin that further evidence for the
  • of Vestiges to him. It took another ten years before Darwin felt ready to start collating his
  • six months before he started sorting his species notes, Darwin had worried that the process would
  • I shall feel, if I when I get my notes together on species &c &c, the whole thing explodes
  • immutability of species ’, he told his cousin William Darwin Fox. Experimental work
  • geograph. distribution, geological historyaffinities &c &c &c.. And it seems to me, …
  • him: none more so than that of his old friend, the geologist Charles Lyell, who, in May 1856, twenty
  • his theory ( Darwin's Journal ). Just a month earlier, Lyells brother-in-law Charles
  • Darwin also understood the urgency to publish and, following Lyells advice in May 1856, began to
  • By November 1856, he had both good and bad news to report to Lyell: ‘ I am working very steadily at
  • the Original Type', which Wallace asked to be forwarded to Lyell (Wyhe 2012). Writing to
  • called diphtheria. Then, on 23 June, Darwins infant son, Charles, ‘ commenced with Fever of some
  • his nurse had sickened. The following day, Darwin accepted Lyell and Hookers suggestion that they
  • now writing a great work. He showed it to Dr. Hooker and Sir Charles Lyell, who thought so highly of
  • and a half chapters were edited and published in 1975 by R. C. Stauffer under the title Charles