skip to content

Darwin Correspondence Project

Search: contains ""

400 Bad Request

Bad Request

Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand.


Apache Server at dcp-public.lib.cam.ac.uk Port 443
Search:
in keywords
57 Items
Page:  1 2 3  Next

Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 26 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect
  • ease of distribution sometime in late 1867 or early 1868. Darwin went over his questions, refining
  • was the collection of observations on a global scale. Darwin was especially interested in peoples
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • The Scottish botanist John Scott wrote from Calcutta, 4 May 1868 : “Shame isexpressed by an
  • and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such
  • the collection of information to its display in print. After Darwin received all of the replies to
  • exceptyesorno.” “The same state of mindDarwin would later assert in Expression of the
  • uniformity.” Table of Correspondence about Darwins Questionnaire (click on the letter
  • could available online ahead of schedule as part of theDarwin and Human Natureproject, funded by
  • Fuegians Brooke, C.A.J. 30 Nov 1870
  • Dyaks Brooke, C.A.J. 30 April 1871
  • Southampton, England letter to W.E. Darwin shrugging/pouting of
  • Unknown? comments from A.D. Bartlett and S. Sutton
  • pouting Darwin, W.E. [after 29 March 1868] …
  • in blind students Darwin, W.E. [7? April
  • blushing Darwin, W.E. [22? April 1868] …
  • 13 June 1870 Portman Square, London W., England (about Auracania, Peru) …
  • Foster, Michael 4 June [1871] Trinity College, …
  • Geach, F.F. 4 July 1868 Johore, Malaysia
  • … (about Pugets Sound, Oregon,USA) N. W. Indians
  • Haast, J.F.J. von 4 Dec 1867 Christchurch, New
  • aborigines Lubbock, E.F. [1867-8?] …
  • 32 Queen Anne St. Cavendish Square W, London, England Enclosed letter from Dr. …

Darwin in letters, 1881: Old friends and new admirers

Summary

In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began writing about all the eminent men he had met. He embarked on this task, which formed an addition to his autobiography, because he had nothing else to do. He had…

Matches: 18 hits

  • In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began
  • restrict himself tomore confined & easy subjects’. A month earlier, on 23 February , he had
  • sweetest place on this earth’. From the start of the year, Darwin had his demise on his mind. He
  • provision for the dividing of his wealth after his death. Darwins gloominess was compounded by the
  • of his book on earthworms, published in October, was a boost. His 5-year-old grandson Bernard, who
  • Evolution old and new when revising his essay on Erasmus Darwins scientific work, and that Darwin
  • Butler, as he told his daughter Henrietta Litchfield on 4 January , ‘would like its publication
  • as for its success’, Darwin told Arabella Buckley on 4 January . Buckley had suggested
  • decided to print500 more, making 2000’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 January 1881 ). Unlike
  • publish, although he was sending his printersin 3 or 4 weeks the M.S. of a quite small book of
  • … & very surprising the whole case is to me’ (letters to W. E. Darwin, 31 January [1881] and
  • suggestions of such plants, especially annuals ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 21 March [1881] ) …
  • with you’, a Swedish teacher told him ( letter from C. E. Södling, 14 October 1881 ), while H. M. …
  • little, to the general stock of knowledge’ ( letter to E. W. Bok, 10 May 1881 ). Josef Popper, an
  • of the nature & capabilities of the Fuegians’ ( letter to W. P. Snow, 22 November 1881 ). …
  • pointing out that in science he considered2nd, 3rd and 4th rate men of very high importance’. …
  • … ‘not absurd for one with no pretensions’ (l etter from W. E. Darwin, 13 January [1881 ]), Darwin
  • after expressing their wish to visit Darwin ( letter from E. B. Aveling, 27 September [1881] ). …

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … (1) Alberts, Karl (4) Alberts, Maurice …
  • … (2) Allman, G. J. (4) Althaus, Julius …
  • … (1) Atkinson, Edward (4) Aubertin, J. J. …
  • … (1) Bailey, W. W. (4) Baillie, A. F. …
  • … (1) Bary, Anton de (4) Bashford, Frederick …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …

Diagrams and drawings in letters

Summary

Over 850 illustrations from the printed volumes of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin have been added to the online transcripts of the letters. The contents include maps, diagrams, drawings, sketches and photographs, covering geological, botanical,…

Matches: 7 hits

  • … his geological work in N. Wales since he and CD parted,  4 September 1831 Thomas Sutcliffe …
  • … [1–23 July 1841] William Hopkins's comments on a compass diagram designed to show the …
  • … 1872 CD asks G. C. Wallich for the negative of a photograph of smiling girl (enclosed) and …
  • … on the age and divisions of the Palaeolithic period,  4 March 1878 C. B. Clarke's …
  • … containing bud samples,  12 May 1878 G. H. Darwin's drawings of  Thalia dealbata  …
  • … 1879 Anthony Rich's description of the movement of a caterpillar,  1 July 1879 …
  • … californica , enclosed in a letter from Asa Gray,   4 April 1880 Adolf Ernst's …

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 19 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • 1879 ). He was also unsatisfied with his account of Erasmus Darwin, declaring, ‘My little biography
  • to Francis Galton, 15 [June 1879] ). Even the prospect of a holiday in the Lake District in August
  • he fretted, just days before his departure ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] …
  • all over like a baked pear’ ( enclosure in letter from R. W. Dixon, 20 December 1879 ). The year
  • to complete Horaces marriage settlement ( letter from W. M. Hacon, 31 December 1879 ). …
  • … & would please Francis’, he pointed out ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 13 March [1879 ]). …
  • thoughtperfect in every way’ ( letter from E. A. Wheler, 25 March 1879 ). She suggested that
  • me’, Darwin wrote enthusiastically to Reginald Darwin on 4 April , declaring that reading it was
  • and he regretted going beyond histether’ ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 5 June 1879 , and
  • independent of him as possible’, Francis told Darwin on 4 July, after reporting that he had
  • with Ubba about your return’, Darwin wrote to Francis on 4 July , ‘He saidit is likely he will
  • travellerneither cross nor ennuied’ (Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [4 August 1879] (DAR 219.1: 125
  • say that he has opposed it’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [4 August 1879] (DAR 219.1: …
  • get home ‘& began drumming at once’ (Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [27 August 1879] (DAR 219
  • it dominated the picture (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [17 July 1879] (DAR 219.9: …
  • men of science quarrelled (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [6 September 1879] (DAR 219.1: …

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 23 hits

  • Charles Darwins daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and
  • 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University
  • excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwins letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwins own discussion of religious belief in
  • of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his
  • one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and
  • period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the
  • Two Mission priests Mr. Maclagan 3 & Mr. Wilkinson 4 had the bulk of the work. …
  • whom of course was Lena had any knowledge of it. M r . W. spoke or preached as u like to call it
  • … & of course everybody was unrevived, but Lena describes Mr. W. as having a definite physical
  • but as for any ennobling effect I think in her heart she w d  allow he had none. Mr. Maclagan on
  • them of a higher lifeThe plan of the Mission is 3 or 4 services every day in the church with one
  • of the excitementThere was a special service which began w a hymn sung kneeling. Screaming was
  • an agitated manner that she must go home to her Father who w d  be waiting for herwhen down came
  • this but how many misunderstandings & wounded feelings w d . be prevented if it was realised
  • of words. March 26th/71 Had a long talk w Sno on education first in which Sno quoted G
  • individual. Free will she has to give up in many regions & w d  be prepared to give it up
  • taking away what they have no equivalent for. July 4th 1871. How hard it is to wait
  • came in seemed so longI dont think the next 21 hours w d  ever have gone—& then came my
  • his voice   10 years on how will it be when we are 50 & 40 respectively. Supposing we do not
  • mind. And yet I dont feel in such a fever & I slept this a.m. I believe what he says is the
  • ones to cultivate a habit of mind above & beyond I think w d  be possible. If the girls & …
  • Hampshire Advertiser , 21 January 1871, p. 7. 4 Probably John Bourdieu Wilkinson . …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 22 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the second reading notebook. Readers primarily interested in Darwins scientific reading, therefore, …
  • the University of Cambridge. These works, catalogued by H. W. Rutherford ( Catalogue of the library
  • published in Paris (in 2 vols.), so long ago as 1839 4  [Pierquin de Gembloux 1839]. Said to
  • 1838] Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. Lawrence 1819] read Bory
  • 1822] Falconers remark on the influence of climate [W. Falconer 1781] [DAR *119: 2v. …
  • et anim: on sleep & movements of plants  £ 1 ..s  4. [Dutrochet 1837] Voyage aux
  • … [Dampier 1697] Sportsmans repository 4 to . [W. H. Scott 1820]— contains much on dogs
  • of variation in animals in the different isl ds  of E Indian Archipelago— [DAR *119: 6v.] …
  • 2 vols. 8vo. avec 2 atlas 4to. ibid, 181823. £1 2 s  [E. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire 181823] …
  • said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith 1793] Fabricius (very old
  • at Maer.— Lives of Kepler & Galileo. Drinkwater [J. E. Drinkwater] 1833]— Prof. …
  • on Aurochs [Weissenborn 1838] Smiths grammar [J. E. Smith 1821] & introduct of Botany [J. …
  • Bernier, François. 1826Travels in the Mogul Empire A.D.   16561668 . Translated by Irving
  • Bethune, John. 1840Poems by the late John Bethune; with a   sketch of the authors life by his
  • eds.]  119: 11a Blacklock, Ambrose. 1838A treatise on sheep; with the   best means

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 20 hits

  • The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his
  • the whole of the confounded book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwins time for the
  • way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from
  • offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be
  • … , ‘for as my son Frank says, “you treat man in such a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate
  • taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases
  • year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression. Darwin continued to investigate the
  • of illustrating his book. The year  also brought a significant milestone for the family, as
  • … [of] the facts, during several past years, has been a great amusement’. Darwin had been working
  • work on species theory in the late 1830s. In recent years, Darwin had collected a wealth of material
  • liking, ‘to keep in memory of the book’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 20 March 1871 ). Reaction
  • to be the truth, whether pleasant or not’ (letter from W. W. Reade, 21 February 1871). The geologist
  • OldhamThey club together to buy them’ ( letter from W. B. Dawkins, 23 February 1871 ). Thomas
  • to make it darker than the hair on his head ( letter from W. B. Tegetmeier, [before 25 April 1871] …
  • a high aesthetic appreciation of beauty ( letter from E. J. Pfeiffer, [before 26 April 1871] ). …
  • most deep and tender religious feeling’ ( letter from F. E. Abbot, 20 August 1871 ). The Anglican
  • produce physiological changes ( letter from Michael Foster, 4 June [1871] ). Pangenesis
  • can hardly sit up, so no more’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 4 August [1871] ). On 23 September he
  • year, but he was sympathetic about the venture: ‘it w d  be almost superhuman virtue to give it up
  • who wasas good as twice refined gold’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 September [1871] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1882: Nothing too great or too small

Summary

In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous October, and for the first time in decades he was not working on another book. He remained active in botanical research, however. Building on his recent studies in plant…

Matches: 23 hits

  • In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous
  • chlorophyll by examining thin slices of plant tissue under a microscope. When not experimenting, he
  • for scientific colleagues or their widows facing hardship. Darwin had suffered from poor health
  • more weak than usual. To Lawson Tait, he remarked, ‘I feel a very old man, & my course is nearly
  • early April, he was being carried upstairs with the aid of a special chair. The end came on 19 April
  • of his scientific friends quickly organised a campaign for Darwin to have greater public recognition
  • Botanical observation and experiment had long been Darwins greatest scientific pleasure. The year
  • Müller, 1 January 1882 , and letter to Fritz Müller, 4 January 1882 ). These were topics that
  • working at the effects of Carbonate of Ammonia on roots,’ Darwin wrote, ‘the chief result being that
  • for some hours in a weak solution of C. of Ammonia’. Darwins interest in root response and the
  • London on 6 and 16 March, respectively. In January, Darwin corresponded with George John
  • letter from Arthur de Souza Corrêa, 28 December 1881 ). Darwin had a long-running interest in such
  • … (see Correspondence vol. 23 and Variation 2: 357404), but they had met with little success. …
  • in apposition’, was read at the Linnean Society on 4 May, but not published. Darwin carried
  • the flowers & experimentising on them’ ( letter to J. E. Todd, 10 April 1882 ). While
  • of the newspaper press’ ( letter from A. T. Rice, 4 February 1882 ). Rice looked to Darwin to
  • and aGlycerin Pepsin mixture’ (letters to W. W. Baxter, 11 March 1882 and 18 March [1882 ]) …
  • he is a good deal depressed about himself’ (letter from H. E. Litchfield to G. H. Darwin, 17 March
  • is very calm but she has cried a little’ (letter from H. E. Litchfield to G. H. Darwin, [19 April
  • overflowing in tenderness’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, 10 May 1882 (DAR 219.1: 150)). …
  • he had witnessed an earthquake in 1835 ( letter from R. E. Alison, [MarchJuly 1835 ]). …
  • without any mercy’ ( letter from Emma Wedgwood to F. E. E. Wedgwood, [28 October 1836] , letter
  • pains)… would be very interesting to me’ ( letter to E. W. V. Harcourt, 24 June [1856] ). In a

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 18 hits

  • … |  Editors and critics  |  Assistants Darwins correspondence helps bring to light a
  • Women: Letter 1194 - Darwin to Whitby, M. A. T., [12 August 1849] Darwin
  • peculiarities in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October
  • fertilise plants in her garden. Letter 4523 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [6 June
  • officinalis . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] …
  • home in South Africa. Letter 6736 - Gray, A. & J. L to Darwin, [8 & 9 May
  • 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] Darwins
  • Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] Anne Jane Cupples, …
  • her nieces ears. Letter 8701 - Lubbock, E. F . to Darwin, [1873] Ellen
  • insects. Men: Letter 2221 - Blyth, E. to Darwin, [22 February 1858] …
  • … “enthusiasm and indomitable patience”. Letter 4242 - Hildebrand, F. H. G. to Darwin
  • contained ina little treatise”. Letter 4436 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [26-27
  • New Zealand. Letter 6453 - Langton, E. to Wedgwood, S. E., [9 November 1868] …
  • Himalaya and Tibet. Letter 4139  - Darwin, W. E. to Darwin, [4 May 1863] …
  • detail. Family letter: Darwin, E. to Darwin, W. E., [January 23rd 1887]: Emma
  • of his garden. Letter 4233  - Tegetmeier, W. B. to Darwin, [29 June - 7 July 1863] …
  • and edited bya lady”. Darwin, E. to Darwin, W. E. , (March, 1862 - DAR 219.1:49) …
  • over. Letter 8153  - Darwin to  Darwin, W. E., [9 January 1872] Darwin

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 17 hits

  • The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • and cosseting regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm
  • Cross and self fertilisation , that the family suffered a devastating loss. The Darwins must have
  • expected in September. Their joy at the safe delivery of a healthy boy was soon replaced by anguish
  • and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and
  • to exclaimnunc dimittis.”’ (‘Recollections’, pp. 41819). Darwin remained firm in his
  • been cast by thepoorest curs in London’ ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [4 February 1876] ). …
  • as stemming a torrent with a reed’, he told Romanes on 4 June , but added, ‘Frankwho sputters
  • hypothesis, first published in 1868 ( Variation 2: 357404). Others had attempted but failed to
  • the previous year ( letter to G. H. Darwin, [after 4 September 1876] ). ...all sorts of
  • of illness & misery there is in the world’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 26 May [1876] ). A
  • we have & you are one of the best of all’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 11 September [1876] ). …
  • she confided to Henrietta (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [31 August 1876] (DAR 219.9: …
  • herself & is so tender’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [13 September 1876] (DAR 210.6
  • completed autobiography (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [13 September 1876] (DAR 210.6: …
  • horticulturists and agriculturists in France ( letter from E. M. Heckel, 27 December 1876 ). In

Volume 29 (1881) is published!

Summary

In October 1881, Darwin published his last book, The formation of vegetable mould through the action of worms: with observations on their habits. A slim volume on a subject that many people could understand and on which they had their own opinions, it went…

Matches: 10 hits

  • From the start of 1881, Darwin had his demise on his mind. He increasingly relied on his son William
  • provision for the dividing of his wealth after his death. Darwins gloominess was compounded by the
  • of his book on earthworms, published in October, was a boost. His 5-year-old grandson Bernard, who
  • the book has been received.    Letter t o Francis Darwin, 9 November [1881] In
  • as for its success.                   Letter to ABBuckley, 4 January 1881 In
  • Arabella Burton Buckley had suggested the possibility, and Darwin, with her help, wrote a memorial
  • … ‘There is no one living to whose kindness in such a matter I could feel myself indebted with so much
  • The Darwins spent June in the Lake District, a family holiday which Darwin contemplated with his
  • …                                 Letter to WEDarwin, 4 August [1881] In early
  • Letter to THFarrer, 28 August 1881 Darwins elder brother, Erasmus, died in

New material added to the American edition of Origin

Summary

A ‘revised and augmented’ American edition of Origin came on the market in July 1860, and was the only authorised edition available in the US until 1873. It incorporated many of the changes Darwin made to the second English edition, but still contained…

Matches: 18 hits

  • Thehistorical sketchprinted as a preface to the American edition ( Origin US ed., pp. ixi) …
  • profit.—  The new Edit. is only Reprint; yet I have made a few  important corrections. I will
  • editionand were preparing for distribution. Acting on Darwins behalf, Gray duly contacted D. …
  • the second English edition, transmitting their response to Darwin (see letters from Asa Gray, [10
  • States law to honour foreign copyright, they agreed to grant Darwin a share of the profits from
  • preparing a new edition at some future date and asked Darwin to provide them with any changes he
  • of species (two letters to Baden Powell, 18 January 1860), Darwin subsequently changed his mind. On
  • espousing favourable views of the transmutation of species; Darwin sent this off to Gray enclosed in
  • A month later, in his letter of 8 March [1860], Darwin sent Gray several more substantive
  • Cottrell Watson in his letter of [3? January 1860]) that Darwin wanted inserted at the conclusion of
  • prise sur lui.’’ In England, the Hon. and Rev. W. Herbert, afterwards Dean of Manchester, in
  • have produced all our existing species. In 184344, Prof. Haldeman (in the Boston (U. S.) …
  • animaux sauvages démontre déjà la variabilité limitée des espèces. Les expériences sur les
  • of finality, ‘‘puissance mystérieuse, indéterminée; fatalité pour les uns; pour les autres, volonté …
  • de lexistence du monde, la forme, le volume et la durée de chacun deux, en raison de sa destinée
  • the world. Hooker has recently shown that in the S. E. corner of Australia, where apparently there
  • incorporated in their proper places.   Page 46, 1 eight lines from bottom, …
  • and bearing in mind, &c., &c. Page 169, 4 tenth line from top, after ‘ …

Darwin in letters, 1875: Pulling strings

Summary

‘I am getting sick of insectivorous plants’, Darwin confessed in January 1875. He had worked on the subject intermittently since 1859, and had been steadily engaged on a book manuscript for nine months; January also saw the conclusion of a bitter dispute…

Matches: 18 hits

  • Editions Plants always held an important place in Darwins theorising about species, and
  • way to continuous writing and revision, activities that Darwin found less gratifying: ‘I am slaving
  • coloured stamens.’ At intervals during the year, Darwin was diverted from the onerous task of
  • chapter of the controversy involved a slanderous attack upon Darwins son George, in an anonymous
  • on 12 January , breaking off all future communication. Darwin had been supported during the affair
  • Society of London, and a secretary of the Linnean Society, Darwins friends had to find ways of
  • pp. 1617). ‘How grandly you have defended me’, Darwin wrote on 6 January , ‘You have also
  • in public. ‘Without cutting him direct’, he advised Darwin on 7 January , ‘I should avoid him, …
  • … & again’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 January 1875 ). Darwin had also considered taking up
  • He expressed his views to his daughter Henrietta on 4 January : ‘I wd gladly punish severely
  • in April 1874 (see Correspondence vol. 22, letters from E. E. Klein, 14 May 1874 and 10
  • day That ever you were born (letter from E. F. Lubbock, [after 2 July] 1875).   …
  • eyes of one variety into another ( Variation 2d ed. 1: 4204, 2: 360). Darwin had encouraged
  • become wholly white’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, [before 4 November 1874] ).   Testing
  • am very glad indeed of your work,’ Darwin replied on 4 November , ‘though I cannot yet follow all
  • plants (Carus trans. 1876a). The German publisher E. Schweizerbartsche Verlagshandlung began to
  • occasions and finally arranged a visit to Down House on 4 May, but was not content with just one
  • agreed to see him at Down with Thiselton-Dyer ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 7 July 1875 ). It

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 19 hits

  • The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now
  • all but the concluding chapter of the work was submitted by Darwin to his publisher in December. …
  • hypothesis of hereditary transmission. Debate about Darwins theory of transmutation
  • alleged evidence of a global ice age, while Asa Gray pressed Darwins American publisher for a
  • … [1866] ). Darwin began riding the cob, Tommy, on 4 June 1866, and in a letter to his
  • before the season is over’ ( letter from John Lubbock, 4 August 1866 ). More predictably, however, …
  • me any harmany how I cant be idle’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 24 August [1866] ).