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Darwin in letters, 1882: Nothing too great or too small

Summary

In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous October, and for the first time in decades he was not working on another book. He remained active in botanical research, however. Building on his recent studies in plant…

Matches: 24 hits

  • In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the
  • for scientific colleagues or their widows facing hardship. Darwin had suffered from poor health
  • is nearly run’ ( letter to Lawson Tait, 13 February 1882 ). His condition worsened in March. …
  • of his scientific friends quickly organised a campaign for Darwin to have greater public recognition
  • Botanical observation and experiment had long been Darwins greatest scientific pleasure. The year
  • styled plants ( letter from Fritz Müller, 1 January 1882 , and letter to Fritz Müller, 4 January
  • working at the effects of Carbonate of Ammonia on roots,’ Darwin wrote, ‘the chief result being that
  • for some hours in a weak solution of C. of Ammonia’. Darwins interest in root response and the
  • London on 6 and 16 March, respectively. In January, Darwin corresponded with George John
  • … & I am glad to shirk any extra labour’ ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 6 January 1882 ). The
  • effects on chlorophyll ( letter to Joseph Fayrer, 30 March 1882 ). He received a specimen of
  • one plant or animal!’ ( letter to Henry Groves, 3 April 1882 ). He wrote to an American in Kansas
  • seeing the flowers & experimentising on them’ ( letter to J. E. Todd, 10 April 1882 ). While
  • their burrows ( Correspondence vol. 29, letter from J. F. Simpson, 8 November 1881 ). He
  • the summit, whence it rolls down the sides’ ( letter from J. F. Simpson, 7 January 1882 ). The
  • on it, which would have pleased me greatly’ ( letter from J. H. Gilbert, 9 January 1882, and
  • and was no longer able to take his daily strolls (Henrietta Emma Litchfield, ‘Charles Darwins death
  • E. Litchfield to G. H. Darwin, 17 March 1882 (DAR 245: 319)) Emma wrote ten days later: ‘You will
  • been a good deal plagued with dull aching in the chest’ (Emma Darwin to G. H. Darwin, [ c . 28
  • benefit & he escaped pain entirely yesterday’ (letter from Emma Darwin to G. H. Darwin, 6 April
  • desires, grant us this our modest request!’ ( letter from J. L. Ambrose, 3 April 1882 ). Darwin
  • wrote to George, who had visited Down on 11 April (Emma Darwins diary (DAR 242)). ‘Father was taken
  • H. Darwin, [19 April 1882] (DAR 245: 320)). It was left to Emma to convey the sorrowful news to his
  • which I hope were never very violent’ ( letter from Emma Darwin to J. D. Hooker, [20 April 1882

The full edition is now online!

Summary

For nearly fifty years successive teams of researchers on both sides of the Atlantic have been working to track down all surviving letters written by or to Charles Darwin, research their content, and publish the complete texts. The thirtieth and final…

Matches: 9 hits

  • to track down all surviving letters written by or to Charles Darwin, research their content, and
  • picture than we have ever had before of the course of Darwins life and development of his thought. …
  • the last 6 yearsThose 400 letters flesh out the whole of Darwins life from his time on board HMS  …
  • volumeDiscover more about the final months of Darwin's life in our Life and Letters
  • run. ’ Letter to Lawson Tait, 13 February 1882 In early 1882, Darwin, who
  • as I am. ’ Letter to John Murray, 21 January 1882 Darwin was by now confident
  • no pain. ’ Letter to THHuxley, 27 March 1882 Darwin wrote this to Thomas
  • my children it is worth having .’ Letter from Emma Darwin to JDHooker, [20 April 1882] …
  • on 20 April: this letter concludes the correspondence for 1882. The family had expected Darwin to be

Dramatisation script

Summary

Re: Design – Adaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and others… by Craig Baxter – as performed 25 March 2007

Matches: 22 hits

  • Re: DesignAdaptation of the Correspondence of Charles Darwin, Asa Gray and othersby Craig
  • as the creator of this dramatisation, and that of the Darwin Correspondence Project to be identified
  • correspondence or published writings of Asa Gray, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, Jane Loring
  • Actor 1Asa Gray Actor 2Charles Darwin Actor 3In the dress of a modern day
  • the play unfolds and acting as a go-between between Gray and Darwin, and between the audience and
  • this, he sends out copies of his Review of the Life of Darwin. At this time in his life, Asa
  • friends in England, copies of hisReview of the Life of Darwin’… pencilling the address so that it
  • of natural selection to his friend, the botanist, Joseph D Hooker GRAY:   3   Charles
  • year 1839, and copied and communicated to Messrs Lyell and Hooker in 1844, being a part of
  • DARWIN:   7   January 1844. My dear Hooker. I have beenengaged in a very presumptuous work
  • the opportunity I enjoyed of making your acquaintance at Hookers three years ago; and besides that
  • sheet of note-paper! DARWIN11   My dear HookerWhat a remarkably nice and kind
  • 22   Hurrah I got yesterday my 41st Grass! Hooker is younger than Darwin and Gray by
  • species beforeDARWIN24   My dear Hookeryou cannot imagine how pleased I am
  • Thank God he will never suffer more in this world. Poor Emma behaved nobly and how she stood it all
  • DARWINMy wifes remark on reading this, was EMMA: Why, you know nothing about Logic. …
  • …   A GREAT DRAWBACK TO THE PRIVILEGES OF OLD AGE: 1882 In which Darwin dies and is
  • notorietyCharles Darwin died on the 19th April [1882], a few months after the completion of
  • AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, PROCEEDINGS XVII, 1882 4  C DARWIN TO JD HOOKER
  • C DARWIN, 1819 AUGUST 1862 149 C DARWIN TO J. D. HOOKER 26 JULY 1863 150
  • TO C DARWIN, 29 NOVEMBER 1879 209 A GRAY, 1882, MEMOIR OF DARWIN 210 A
  • FUNERAL 211 A GRAY TO JD HOOKER, 21 APR 1882 212 A GRAY TO JD HOOKER, 31 OCT

Darwin in letters, 1881: Old friends and new admirers

Summary

In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began writing about all the eminent men he had met. He embarked on this task, which formed an addition to his autobiography, because he had nothing else to do. He had…

Matches: 23 hits

  • In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began
  • a very old man, who probably will not last much longer.’ Darwins biggest fear was not death, but
  • which I can do’, he wrote despondently to Joseph Dalton Hooker on 15 June , concluding, ‘I must
  • sweetest place on this earth’. From the start of the year, Darwin had his demise on his mind. He
  • provision for the dividing of his wealth after his death. Darwins gloominess was compounded by the
  • and new admirers got in touch, and, for all his fears, Darwin found several scientific topics to
  • learnt from its own individual experience ( letter from G. J. Romanes, 7 March 1881 ). The
  • made clear the veneration in which he was held. ‘Id give one year of my life for one hours
  • vol. 30, letter to C. A. Kennard, 9 January 1882 ). ‘I sometimes receive so many
  • patted one of the Fuegians on the shoulder (l etter from B. J. Sulivan, 18 March 1881 ). …
  • which he thoughtan excellent Journal’ ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 4 July [1881] ). In these ways, …
  • friends, however, did not agree. Both John Lubbock and Hooker asked for Darwins advice when writing
  • … ( letter to John Lubbock, [18 September 1881] ). When Hooker, anxious about his address on
  • oneand hadgone much outof his mind ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 20 June [1881] ). Feeling
  • approach to omniscience than for originality’, and telling Hooker, ‘Your long letter has stirred
  • we had many a discussion & many a good fight’ (letters to J. D. Hooker, 6 August 1881 and
  • atrocious a manner on all physiologists’ ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 18 April 1881 ). A letter he
  • would be with a less intelligent man’ ( letter from G. J. Romanes, 1 July [1881] ). Despite this, …
  • soul, he said that he shd. not ask you to send any more.’ Emma Darwin clearly had different concerns
  • power’ ( letter from M. C. Stanley, 16 October 1881 ). Hooker thanked Darwin for  thediet  of  …
  • have a domestic life & public duties!’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [23 October 1881] ). …
  • Nature published the day after Darwins death in April 1882. Deaths, gifts and legacies
  • with the happy news of a birth. On 7 December, Charles and Emma Darwins second grandchild, another

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 15 hits

  • Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those
  • a broad variety of women had access to, and engaged with, Darwin's published works. A set of
  • women a target audience? Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • that his views are original and will appeal to the public. Darwin asks Murray to forward the
  • and criticisms of style. Letter 2461 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] …
  • it had been proofread and edited bya lady”. Darwin, E. to Darwin, W. E. , (March 1862
  • tone and style. Letter 7329 - Murray , J. to Darwin, [28 September 1870] …
  • Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, J., [29 September 1870] Darwin asks Murray to
  • to women. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November 1872] …
  • … - Barnard, A. to Darwin, [30 March 1871] J. S. Henslows daughter, Anne, responds to
  • with her father. Letter 7651 - Wedgwood, F. J. to Darwin, H. E., [1 April 1871] …
  • be suitable. Letter 7411 - Pfeiffer, E. J. to Darwin, [before 26 April 1871] …
  • Letter 13650 Kennard, C. A. to Darwin, [28 January 1882] Caroline Kennard responds
  • patience and care. Letter 6110 - Samuelson, J. to Darwin, [10 April 1868] …
  • is a revelation. Letter 9633 - Nevill, D. F. to Darwin, [11 September 1874] …

Darwin in letters, 1877: Flowers and honours

Summary

Ever since the publication of Expression, Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The year 1877 was no exception. The spring and early summer were spent completing Forms of flowers, his fifth book on a botanical topic. He then turned to the…

Matches: 25 hits

  • Ever since the publication of Expression , Darwins research had centred firmly on botany. The
  • of these projects would culminate in a major publication. Darwins botany was increasingly a
  • assisted his fathers research on movement and bloom, and Darwin in turn encouraged his sons own
  • The year 1877 was more than usually full of honours. Darwin received two elaborate photograph albums
  • from Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands. Closer to home, Darwin received an honorary Doctorate of
  • sites for possible earthworm activity. Now in his 69th year, Darwin remained remarkably productive, …
  • no controversy. In his autobiographical reflections, Darwin remarked: ‘no little discovery of
  • … (‘Recollections’, p. 419). During the winter and spring, Darwin was busy preparing the manuscript of
  • … & stigmas’, Darwin remarked to Joseph Dalton Hooker on 25 January . He had been troubling
  • it is not likely that more than a few hundred copies w d . be sold’. His publisher knew from
  • He requested a large number of plants from Hooker on 25 May , adding, ‘I often wish that I could
  • to Down if it lay in my power and you thought it w d . help you.’ ‘I declare had it not been for
  • warned Thiselton-Dyer, who seems to have shared Hookers suspicion of ambitious gardeners ( letter
  • fullers teasel ( Dipsacus sylvestris , a synonym of D. fullonum ). He thought that the
  • to the Royal Society of London by Darwin, who confessed to Hooker on 25 January , ‘I know that it
  • of its being printed in the R. Soc. Transactions, (sh d . the referees so order) would stimulate
  • vibratory flagella of some Infusoria’ ( letter from F. J. Cohn, 5 August 1877 ). Franciss paper
  • Die Seele des Kindes (The mind of the child; Preyer 1882), based partly on observations of his son
  • as butter’ ( letter to C. E. Norton, 16 March 1877 ). Hooker was asked repeatedly by the emperor
  • … & offer himself you & me to dejeuner!!!’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 14 June 1877 ). …
  • the old story to be horsewhipped by a duke!’ ( letter to J. M. Rodwell, 3 June 1877 ). Back home, …
  • with wicked imprecations’ (Trollope 1867; letter to G. J. Romanes, [1 and 2 December 1877] ). …
  • … [1877] ). In the end, Darwin made the journey along with Emma. George, Francis, and Horace also
  • Cambridge Chronicle , 24 November 1877, p. 4). According to Emma, Darwin remainedquite stout and
  • without lying down to rest’, he explained ( letter to J. W. Clark, 12 November 1877 ). …

Darwin’s hothouse and lists of hothouse plants

Summary

Darwin became increasingly involved in botanical experiments in the years after the publication of Origin. The building of a small hothouse - a heated greenhouse - early in 1863  greatly increased the range of plants that he could keep for scientific…

Matches: 15 hits

  • Towards the end of 1862, Darwin resolved to build a small hothouse at Down House, forexperimental
  • hothouse early in 1863 marked something of a milestone in Darwins botanical work, since it greatly
  • … (Down House MS) and  Correspondence  vol5, letter to JD. Hooker, 19 April [1855] ). Darwin
  • Though his greenhouse was probably heated to some extent, Darwin found himself on several occasions
  • make observations and even experiments on his behalf. Darwins decision to build a hothouse
  • to touch (see  Correspondence  vol10, letter to JD. Hooker, 12 [December 1862] and n13). …
  • … [1862] ( Correspondence  vol10) Darwin told Hooker: I have almost resolved to
  • of prizes & is very observant. He believes that we sh d  succeed with a little patience; …
  • mid-January, and completed by mid-February (see letters to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] and
  • plants for use in a wide variety of experiments. He told Hooker that he waslooking with much
  • shall keep to curious & experimental plants’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 13 January [1863] ). …
  • plants you want before going to Nurserymen’ (letter from JD. Hooker, [15 January 1863] ). …
  • avoid[,] of course I must not have from Kew’ (letter to JD. Hooker, 30 January [1863] ). …
  • of moss, peat, and charcoal (see the letter from Henrietta Emma Darwin to William Erasmus Darwin, …
  • many botanical experiments (see, for example, A. de Candolle 1882, p495). The greenhouses were, …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 28 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • 4  [Pierquin de Gembloux 1839]. Said to be good by D r  L. Lindsay 5 [DAR *119: 1v. …
  • … [A. von Humboldt 1811] Richardsons Fauna Borealis [J. Richardson 182937] …
  • Brown 1814] & at the end of Congo voyage [R. Brown 1818]. (Hooker 923) 7  read
  • on Annals of Nat. Hist. [Jenyns 1838] Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. …
  • Teneriffe. in Pers. Narr. [A. von Humboldt 181429] D r  Royle on Himmalaya types [Royle
  • reference to authors about E. Indian Islands 8 consult D r  Horsfield [Horsfield 1824] …
  • sheep [Youatt 1831, 1834, 1837]. Verey Philosophie dHist. Nat. [Virey 1835] read
  • Paper on consciousness in brutes Blackwood June 1838 [J. F. Ferrie 1838]. H. C. Watson on
  • to White Nat. Hist of Selbourne [E. T. Bennett ed. 1837 and [J. Rennie] ed. 1833] read 19  : …
  • what have they written.? “Hunt” [J. Hunt 1806] p. 290
  • He is Horticulturist in France. Michaux, according to Hooker has written on topography of N. …
  • chiefly on distribution of forms said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith
  • … ]. many very useful papers for me:— not in Hort. Soc. Hooker? Rogets Bridgewater Treatise
  • … —— Mauritius & C. of Good Hope Hooker recommends order [Backhouse
  • Decandolles Veg: Organ: } recommended by  Hooker . [A. P. de
  • C. Watson 1845]— gives up permanent species (alluded to by Hooker) Foreign & British Med. …
  • 1833] (Boot) Leslie life of Constable [Leslie 1843]. (Emma) (read) M rs  Frys Life
  • Public Library. 3  ‘BooksReadis in Emma Darwins hand. 4  “”Traité …
  • 6  The text from page [1v.] to page [6] is in Emma Darwins hand and was copied from Notebook C, …
  • never read his works ( Calendar  no. 11875). In February 1882, however, after reading the
  • to old Aristotle.’ ( LL 3: 252). 10  Emma Darwin wrote7 thinstead of3 d “ …
  • 12  A mistranscription forEntozoaby Emma Darwin. See Notebook C, p. 266 ( Notebooks ). …
  • wroteTransactto replaceJournalwritten in Emma Darwins hand. 16  Emma Darwin