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Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 23 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August 1874] ). …
  • backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). I feel
  • researcher Frederick William Henry Myers, and Thomas Henry Huxley, who sent a long report to Darwin
  • Mr Williams wasa cheat and an imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). Darwin
  • that he was thus free to perform his antics’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 29 January [1874] ). This
  • alloweda spirit séanceat his home ( letter from T. G. Appleton, 2 April 1874 ). Back
  • sweetly all the horrid bother of correction’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 21 [March 1874] ). The
  • and disease in the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii; letters from T. N. Staley, 12 February 1874 and
  • additions to  Descent  was an eight-page note written by Huxley with the aim of ending a dispute
  • ape and human brains, he asked for a clarifying note from Huxley (Desmond and Moore 2004, pp. xxxv
  • I have pounded the enemy into a jelly’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 14 April 1874 ). The technical
  • Descent  was published in November 1874 ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). Though
  • on subsequent print runs would be very good ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 12 November 1874 ). …
  • review me in a hostile spirit’ ( letter to John Murray, 11 August 1874 ). Darwin was
  • Correspondence  vol. 20, letter to St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwins relief, …
  • the moment of being hatched ( letter to  Nature , 7 and 11 May [1874] ; Spalding 1872a). …
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • details of an Australian variety of sundew ( letter from T. C. Copland, 23 June 1874 ). …
  • Sharpe for promotion at the British Museum ( letter to R. B. Sharpe, 24 November [1874] ).  He

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 24 hits

  • At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of  The variation of
  • markedly, reflecting a decline in his already weak health. Darwin then began punctuating letters
  • am languid & bedeviled … & hate everybody’. Although Darwin did continue his botanical
  • letter-writing dwindled considerably. The correspondence and Darwins scientific work diminished
  • of the water-cure. The treatment was not effective and Darwin remained ill for the rest of the year. …
  • the correspondence from the year. These letters illustrate Darwins preoccupation with the
  • Charles Lyell, the respected geologist, and Thomas Henry Huxley, the zoologist and anatomist. Lyell
  • a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] . When Huxleys book described the detailed
  • views of human dignity and intelligence, exclaiming to Huxley: ‘I declare I never in my life read
  • circles following the publication of Lyells and Huxleys books. Three years earlier Darwin
  • regarding species change ( letter from Charles Lyell, 11 March 1863 ). The botanist Asa Gray, …
  • by descent put himinto despair’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 11 May [1863] ). In the same letter, he
  • bottom of seas, lakes, and rivers ( Correspondence vol. 11, Appendix VII). Quarrels at
  • sentence from the second edition of  Antiquity of man  (C. Lyell 1863b, p. 469), published in
  • on this subject seems to get rarer & rarer’ ( letter to H. W. Bates, 18 April [1863] ), …
  • for the Natural History Review  ( see letter to H. W. Bates, 12 January [1863] ). Darwin added
  • Academy of Sciences, Berlin (see Correspondence vol. 11, Appendix III), and of the Société des
  • unsuccessful ( see letter from E. A. Darwin to Emma Darwin, 11 November [1863] ). The council of
  • to J. D. Hooker, [9 May 1863] , and memorandum from G. H. Darwin, [before 11 May 1863]) . …
  • at the end of 1862, and published as a book in early 1863 (T. H. Huxley 1863a). Though Darwin was
  • natural sterility of species, when crossed’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 10 [January 1863] ). He
  • and Lyells  Antiquity of man  ( see letter from T. H. Huxley, 25 February 1863 , and letter
  • very slowly recovering, but am very weak’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, [29 September? 1863] ). …
  • Thomass Hospital, London ( letter from George Busk, [ c. 27 August 1863] ). Brinton, who

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … ‘My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, ‘is so nearly closed. . .  What little
  • of   On the origin of   species , intended to be Darwins last, and of  Expression of the
  • books brought a strong if deceptive sense of a job now done: Darwin intended, he declared to Alfred
  • on 'so difficult a subject, as evolution’ ( letter to ARWallace,  27 July [1872] ). …
  • of books and papers, and the latter formed the subject of Darwins last bookThe formation of   …
  • set the final price at 7 s.  6 d.  ( letter from RFCooke, 12 February 1872 ). …
  • remained unpublished at the end of the year ( letter from C.-FReinwald, 23 November 1872 ). …
  • St George Jackson Mivart ( letter to St GJMivart,  11 January [1872] ). A worsening
  • Whale  & duck  most beautiful’ ( letter from ARWallace, 3 March 1872 ). I
  • enclosed a copy of an article replying to Thomas Henry Huxleys scathing review of  Genesis of
  • Mivart not to acknowledge it ( letter to St GJMivart, 11 January [1872] ). 'I hate
  • … `chiefly perhaps because I do it badly’ ( letter to ARWallace, 3 August [1872] ).  …
  • the theories of natural and sexual selection to bees (HMüller 1872), and with his reply Darwin
  • for myself it is dreadful doing nothing’ ( letter to THHuxley, 22 October [1872] ). He was far
  • attacks on Darwin became notorious, had written on 11 May expressing concern that his recently, …
  • from his ignorance, he feels no doubts’ ( letter to FCDonders, 17 June 1872 ). Right up to the
  • by her husband, Richard Buckley Litchfield ( letter to HELitchfield, 13 May 1872 ). Delivery
  • … 'I know that I am half-killed myself’ ( letter to HELitchfield, 25 July 1872 ). A
  • well informed: `The die is cast’, he wrote excitedly on 11 May , when the matter was first raised
  • Charlton Bastians recent book on the origin of life (HCBastian 1872; Wallace 1872d) left him
  • … & new views which are daily turning up’ ( letter to ARWallace, 28 August [1872] ).  …
  • Lord Sackville Cecil, to attend a séance ( letter from MCStanley, 4 June 1872 ). There was
  • muscles when attending women in labour ( letter from JTRothrock, 25 November 1872 ); others
  • gift, although he doubted he would ever use it ( letter to CLDodgson, 10 December 1872 ). …
  • … ). Plants that move and eat `Now, pray dont run off on some other track till you have
  • 23 December 1872, CD note ), and he exclaimed to Thomas Huxley that he would like a society formed, …

Scientific Practice

Summary

Specialism|Experiment|Microscopes|Collecting|Theory Letter writing is often seen as a part of scientific communication, rather than as integral to knowledge making. This section shows how correspondence could help to shape the practice of science, from…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … the work of collecting, and the construction of theory. Darwin was not simply a gentleman naturalist …
  • … of the most advanced laboratory methods and equipment. Darwin used letters as a speculative space, …
  • … Specialism and Detail Darwin is usually thought of as a gentleman naturalist and a …
  • … across and drew together different fields of knowledge. But Darwin also made substantial …
  • … discussion was often the starting point for some of Darwin's most valuable and enduring …
  • … than Huxley thinks. Letter 1592 — Darwin, C. R. to Huxley, T. H., 13 Sept [1854] …

Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 26 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect
  • ease of distribution sometime in late 1867 or early 1868. Darwin went over his questions, refining
  • was the collection of observations on a global scale. Darwin was especially interested in peoples
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such
  • the collection of information to its display in print. After Darwin received all of the replies to
  • nodding vertically Blair, R.H. 11 July
  • Fuegians Brooke, C.A.J. 30 Nov 1870
  • Dyaks Brooke, C.A.J. 30 April 1871
  • Chaumont, F.S.B.F. de 11 March 1871 Woolston, …
  • Ceylon enclosed in letter from G.H.K. Thwaites
  • Christchurch, New Zealand doesn't answer queries but includes list of men
  • will forward query Huxley, H.A. 22 Mar
  • Aborigines Lane, H.B. 13 Aug 1868
  • Reade, Winwood W. [c.8 or 9 Apr 1870] Accra, West
  • 9 Nov 1870 11 St Mary Abbot's Terrace, London, England
  • 1 Feb 1871 11 St Mary Abbot's Terrace, London, England   …
  • 7 Sept 1872 11 St Mary Abbot's Terrace, London, England
  • 1 Feb. 1871 11 Saint Mary Abbot's Terrace, Kensington. W., London, …
  • in Hottentots Smyth, R. Brough 13 Aug 1868
  • Sulivan, B.J. 11 Jan 1867 Bournemouth, England
  • aborigines Thwaites, G.H.K. 1 Apr 1868
  • Wallace, A. R. 11 March [1867] 9 St. Marks Crescent
  • Kanara), Bombay, India forwarded by H.N.B. Erskine

Darwin in letters, 1860: Answering critics

Summary

On 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s Origin of species, printing off another 3000 copies to satisfy the demands of an audience that surprised both the publisher and the author. It wasn't long, however, before ‘the…

Matches: 20 hits

  • 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwins  Origin of species , printing
  • surprised both the publisher and the author. One week later Darwin was stunned to learn that the
  • But it was the opinion of scientific men that was Darwins main concern. He eagerly scrutinised each
  • some of those whose support he most wanted: Thomas Henry Huxley, William Benjamin Carpenter, and
  • his views. ‘One cannot expect fairness in a Reviewer’, Darwin commented to Hooker after reading an
  • … ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 January [1860] ). Darwins magnanimous attitude soon faded, …
  • butunfairreviews that misrepresented his ideas, Darwin began to feel that without the early
  • it was his methodological criticism in the accusation that Darwin haddeserted the inductive track, …
  • to J. S. Henslow, 8 May [1860] ). Above all else Darwin prided himself on having developed a
  • was a hypothesis, not a theory, therefore also displeased Darwin. Comparing natural selection to the
  • it comes in time to be admitted as real.’ ( letter to C. J. F. Bunbury, 9 February [1860] ). This
  • yet understand the concept of natural selection. Even Huxley, an avowed supporter, proved a
  • inter se ,’ Darwins theory would remain unproven (T. H. Huxley 1860a). Darwin had long
  • animal groups could give rise to new species, Darwin found Huxleys lecture irritating and
  • because more accustomed to reasoning.’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 18 May 1860 ). Darwin
  • the geographical distribution of species ( see letter from T. H. Huxley, 6 August 1860 ). But Baer
  • earlier sessions, including the Thursday meeting at which Huxley and Owenhad a furious battle over
  • … ‘for half an hour’, ridiculing Darwinbadly & Huxley savagely’. Huxley rose in response and
  • … ‘this row is best thing for subject.—’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 3 July [1860] ). Further details
  • … (letters to Charles Lyell, 1 June [1860] and 11 August [1860] ). As the months passed

Darwin in letters, 1871: An emptying nest

Summary

The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, with the publication in February of his long-awaited book on human evolution, Descent of man. The other main preoccupation of the year was the preparation of his manuscript on expression.…

Matches: 24 hits

  • The year 1871 was an extremely busy and productive one for Darwin, seeing the publication of his
  • book out of my head’. But  a large proportion of Darwins time for the rest of the year was devoted
  • way, and the initial reception of the book in the press. Darwin fielded numerous letters from
  • offered sharp criticism or even condemnation. Darwin had expected controversy. ‘I shall be
  • a bare-faced manner.”‘ The most lively debate centred on Darwins evolutionary account of the
  • taste. Correspondence with his readers and critics helped Darwin to clarify, and in some cases
  • her liking, ‘to keep in memory of the book’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 20 March 1871 ). …
  • letter from W. B. Dawkins, 23 February 1871 ). Thomas Henry Huxley marvelled that Darwin had been
  • th . ancestor lived between tide-marks!’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 20 February 1871 ). Asa Gray
  • and the heavy use of their arms and legs ( letter from C. L. Bernays, 25 February 1871 ). Samples
  • Arthur Nicols, 7 March 1871 ; letter from B. J. Sulivan, 11 March 1871 ; letter from Hermann
  • is a thing which I sh d  feel very proud of, if anyone c d . say of me.’ After the publication
  • was achieved throughthe medium of opinion, positive law &c’, and transmitted by culture, not
  • Mivart. An expert on primates and a former protegé of Huxleys, Mivart had written several articles
  • Agassiz, Abraham Dee Bartlett, Albert Günther, George Busk, T. H. Huxley, Osbert Salvin, and William
  • … , published the following year. Darwin was also pleased that Huxley took up the defence in an
  • and misquoting of both Darwin and Catholic theology (T. H. Huxley 1871). Huxley judged Mivart to be
  • … ‘accursed Popery and fear for his soul’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley and H. A. Huxley, 20 September
  • in the world except. laughing. crying grinning pouting &c. &c’, he wrote to Hooker on 21
  • so giddy I can hardly sit up, so no more’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 4 August [1871] ). On 23
  • annually on an acre of land at 16 tons (letter from L. C. Wedgwood, [20 November 1871] ). He also
  • … ( letter to Asa Gray, 16 July [1871] , letter to S. R. S. Norton, 23 November [1871] ). …
  • avenerable old Ape’ ( letter from D. Thomas, [after 11 March 1871] ).  Descent  and
  • themselves with the reflection thatTruth doesnt die’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 28 September

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 21 hits

  • Charles Darwins daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and
  • 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University
  • excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwins letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwins own discussion of religious belief in
  • of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his
  • one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and
  • period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the
  • amongst whom of course was Lena had any knowledge of it. M r . W. spoke or preached as u like to
  • W. as having a definite physical effect on her. She cdnt hear him speak without burying her face in
  • who attempted it was to be turned out—& fits they didnt attemptbut otherwise it must have m. …
  • Father who w d  be waiting for herwhen down came M r . W. on his knees between them & said, …
  • any effect on their lives! & on the other hand if it hasnt mustnt it come instead of other
  • yr. feelings reflected in large bodies, even if one didnt sympathise I can perfectly understand
  • if words & facts make such totally opposite effects on diff t . minds, why sh d . it be a
  • worship of humanitythis I hope is only in its budI c d  conceive a life wh. was filled & …
  • be a good wife I have indeed neglected my 10 talents. 11 July 5th. A beautiful day
  • … ½ hour after the 2nd. post came in seemed so longI dont think the next 21 hours w d  ever have
  • Lushingtons. 12 I think he  must  careit cant be only that he thinks I shd be a nice sort
  • match which is to kindle me. The fire is laid but I cant set it alight. Could I bear to rake it out
  • late now. I think it is for better for worse. I cant help grudging that all the bloom has
  • has not been identified. 8 Thomas Henry Huxley . 9 Richard Buckley

Darwin in letters, 1880: Sensitivity and worms

Summary

‘My heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old Shrewsbury friend Henry Johnson on 14 November 1880. Darwin became fully devoted to earthworms in the spring of the year, just after finishing the manuscript of…

Matches: 22 hits

  • heart & soul care for worms & nothing else in this world,’ Darwin wrote to his old
  • to adapt to varying conditions. The implications of Darwins work for the boundary between animals
  • studies of animal instincts by George John Romanes drew upon Darwins early observations of infants, …
  • of evolution and creation. Many letters flowed between Darwin and his children, as he took delight
  • character is of much value to me’ ( letter to C. H. Tindal, 5 January 1880 ). Darwin had employed
  • Darwins Life . ‘In an endeavour to explain away y r . treatment of [William Alvey Darwin],’ …
  • by anticipation the position I have taken as regards D r Erasmus Darwin in my book Evolution old
  • … , sending one or both to his daughter Henrietta ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 1 February [1880] ). …
  • he will have the last word’, she warned ( letter from H. E. Litchfield, [1 February 1880] ). ‘He
  • to the end’, added her husband Richard ( letter from R. B. Litchfield, 1 February 1880 ). Even the
  • him Darwinophobia? It is a horrid disease’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 3 February 1880 ). …
  • Stephens reply on 12 January [1881] echoed that of Huxley: ‘take no further notice of Mr Butler
  • shake their heads in the same dismal manner as you & M r . Murray did, when I told them my
  • in a book about beetles the impressive wordscaptured by C. Darwin”. … This seemed to me glory
  • … ‘but the subject has amused me’ ( letter to W. C. McIntosh, 18 June 1880 ). Members of the family
  • great doctrines …“Come of Age”‘ ( letter from W. C. Williamson to Emma Darwin, 2 September 1880 ). …
  • about 21 years since the Origin appeared”‘ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 11 [April] 1880 ). While
  • been developed through natural selection’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 11 May 1880 ). Worthy
  • claim is not that he is in need, so much as that he cant find employment’ ( Correspondence vol. …
  • prevailing superstitions of this country!’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, [after 26 November 1880] ). …
  • family members. Emmas brother Josiah Wedgwood III died on 11 March. Like Emma, he had married a
  • his voice as clearly as if he were present’ (letters to C. W. Fox, 29 March 1880 and 10 [April

Darwin in letters, 1877: Flowers and honours

Summary

Ever since the publication of Expression, Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The year 1877 was no exception. The spring and early summer were spent completing Forms of flowers, his fifth book on a botanical topic. He then turned to the…

Matches: 28 hits

  • Ever since the publication of Expression , Darwins research had centred firmly on botany. The
  • of these projects would culminate in a major publication. Darwins botany was increasingly a
  • assisted his fathers research on movement and bloom, and Darwin in turn encouraged his sons own
  • The year 1877 was more than usually full of honours. Darwin received two elaborate photograph albums
  • from Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands. Closer to home, Darwin received an honorary Doctorate of
  • sites for possible earthworm activity. Now in his 69th year, Darwin remained remarkably productive, …
  • no controversy. In his autobiographical reflections, Darwin remarked: ‘no little discovery of
  • … (‘Recollections’, p. 419). During the winter and spring, Darwin was busy preparing the manuscript of
  • and presented to the Linnean Society of London. In the book, Darwin adopted the more recent term
  • as dimorphic without comparing pollen-grains & stigmas’, Darwin remarked to Joseph Dalton
  • the popularity of his book, writing to Robert Cooke on 11 April , ‘though I believe it is of
  • suspicion of ambitious gardeners ( letter from W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 25 August 1877 ). At
  • for extended periods. In a letter to Thiselton-Dyer of 11 October , Darwin described how the
  • one of the young leaves with a delicate twig’ ( letter to R. I. Lynch, 14 September 1877 ). …
  • but I think the great honour of its being printed in the R. Soc. Transactions, (sh d . the
  • larger aim was announced in the subtitle: Zeitschrift für einheitliche Weltanschauung auf Grund
  • Charles Darwin and Ernst Haeckel). Writing to Darwin on 11 March 1877 , Krause declared the
  • visits from distinguished persons. Gladstone came to Down on 11 March. ‘I expected a stern, …
  • … ‘I aim to get five lettersfrom yourself, Tyndall, Huxley, Spencer and Draperinclosed in a
  • I hope it may remain for centuries to come’ ( letter from C. C. Graham, 30 January 1877 ). Graham
  • of Siebolds study of medical monstrosity ( letter from C. T. E. Siebold, 10 October 1877 ). An
  • not been a difficulty to me,’ he replied to Romanes on 11 June , ‘as I have never believed in a
  • that they become quite tipsy’ ( letter to W. M. Moorsom, 11 September [1877] ). Moorsom replied
  • any recognition by any public bodies of England & that y r . own University w d . like to be
  • to the mark hereafter is another question’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 30 May [1877] ). In the end, …
  • at the Senate House yesterday, with a suspended monkey &c; but I believe the cheering was more
  • between sagging of pavemts & castings’ ( letter to G. H. Darwin, 21 November [1877] ). It is
  • the evening festivities held in his honour (Thomas Henry Huxley delivered a rousing speech at the

Darwin in letters, 1864: Failing health

Summary

On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July 1864: ‘the venerable beard gives the look of your having suffered, and … of having grown older’.  Because of poor health, Because of poor health, Darwin…

Matches: 20 hits

  • On receiving a photograph from Charles Darwin, the American botanist Asa Gray wrote on 11 July
  • … … of having grown older’. This portrait, the first of Darwin with his now famous beard, had been
  • 52 hours without vomiting!! In the same month, Darwin began to consult William Jenner, …
  • prescribed a variety of antacids and purgatives, and limited Darwins fluid intake; this treatment
  • the dimorphic aquatic cut-grass  Leersia . In May, Darwin finished his paper on  Lythrum
  • he had set aside the previous summer. In October, Darwin let his friends know that on his
  • to the surgeon and naturalist Francis Trevelyan Buckland, Darwin described his symptoms in some
  • November and December were also marked by the award to Darwin of the Royal Societys Copley Medal; …
  • been unsuccessfully nominated the two previous years. As Darwin explained to his cousin William
  • it was conferred, brought a dramatic conclusion to the year. Darwin also wrote to Fox that he was
  • continue his observations indoors ( Correspondence  vol. 11). In a letter of [27 January 1864] …
  • 5 September 1864 ). Fritz Müeller sent his bookFür Darwin , and Darwin had it translated by a
  • two letters to the  Athenæum  ( Correspondence  vol. 11). Darwins anxiety about the matter was
  • its death blowwith the publication of  Origin  (T. H. Huxley 1864a, p. 567). In 1864, …
  • but Lyell says when I read his discussion in the Elements [C. Lyell 1865] I shall recant for fifth
  • had continued to grow following the 1863 publication of Huxleys  Evidence as to mans place in
  • volume on prehistoric humans to Darwin, and Hooker discussed Huxleys heated dispute with officers
  • and the question of human origins ( Correspondence vol. 11). Wallace, however, traced a possible
  • on intellectual &ampmoral  qualities’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 28 [May 1864] ). …
  • had there been any failure of justice’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 4 November