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Darwin’s queries on expression

Summary

When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect observations more widely and composed a list of queries on human expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to Fritz Muller…

Matches: 22 hits

  • When Darwin resumed systematic research on emotions around 1866, he began to collect
  • expression. A number of handwritten copies were sent out in 1867 (see, for example, letter to
  • was the collection of observations on a global scale. Darwin was especially interested in peoples
  • cultural and conventional, or instinctive and universal. Darwin used his existing correspondence
  • and with the mouth a little drawn back at the corners?” Darwins questionnaire was an extension of
  • was also carefully devised so as to prevent the feelings of Darwins remote observers from colouring
  • for other peoples or vice versa. The Scottish botanist John Scott wrote from Calcutta, 4 May 1868
  • and not the susceptibilities of a moral nature.” Darwin did not typically countenance such
  • Correspondence about Darwins Questionnaire (click on the letter dates to see the individual letters
  • funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, and the John Templeton Foundation. …
  • Barber, Mary E. [after Feb 1867] [Grahamstown, Cape
  • nodding vertically Blair, R.H. 11 July
  • Bowker, J.H. [10 Dec 1867] [Cape of Good Hope (South
  • Fuegians Brooke, C.A.J. 30 Nov 1870
  • Dyaks Brooke, C.A.J. 30 April 1871
  • Woolston, Southampton, England letter to W.E. Darwin shrugging
  • London, England Enclosed letter from Dr. C. Browne
  • Reade, Winwood W. [c.8 or 9 Apr 1870] Accra, West
  • to East Asia Scott, John 4 May 1868
  • India   Scott, John 2 July 1869
  • vertical nodding Smith, Andrew 1 Feb. 1871
  • in Hottentots Smyth, R. Brough 13 Aug 1868

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 29 hits

  • At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  …
  • appeared at the end of 1866 and had told his cousin William Darwin Fox, ‘My work will have to stop a
  • … & I am sick of correcting’ ( Correspondence  vol. 16, letter to W. D. Fox, 12 December [1868
  • Well it is a beginning, & that is something’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [22 January 1869] ). …
  • material on emotional expression. Yet the scope of Darwins interests remained extremely broad, and
  • plants, and earthworms, subjects that had exercised Darwin for decades, and that would continue to
  • Carl von  Nägeli and perfectibility Darwins most substantial addition to  Origin  was a
  • a Swiss botanist and professor at Munich (Nägeli 1865). Darwin had considered Nägelis paper
  • principal engine of change in the development of species. Darwin correctly assessed Nägelis theory
  • in most morphological features (Nägeli 1865, p. 29). Darwin sent a manuscript of his response (now
  • made any blunders, as is very likely to be the case’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 13 January 1869 ). …
  • are & must be morphological’. The comment highlights Darwins apparent confusion about Nägelis
  • … ‘purely morphological’. The modern reader may well share Darwins uncertainty, but Nägeli evidently
  • Jenkin. Darwin had been very impressed by Jenkins 1867 review, which argued that any variation in
  • than I now see is possible or probable’ (see also letter to A. R. Wallace, 22 January [1869] , …
  • causing difficulties. The entomologist Frederick Smith, whom Darwin had asked to study the musical
  • and amphibians, while Roland Trimen in South Africa and John Jenner Weir in London sent more
  • of information which I have sent prove of any service to M r . Darwin I can supply him with much
  • … & proximate cause in regard to Man’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 14 April 1869 ).  More
  • and the bird of paradise  (Wallace 1869a; letter to A. R. Wallace, 22 March [1869] ), and
  • an injustice & never demands justice’ ( letter to A. R. Wallace, 14 April 1869 ). …
  • species that Darwin had investigated in depth ( letter from C. F. Claus, 6 February 1869 ). In a
  • a genus that he had studied in the early 1860s ( letter to W. C. Tait, 12 and 16 March 1869 ). …
  • on the previous German edition (Bronn and Carus trans. 1867), as well as on the German translation
  • Sweetland Dallass edition of Fritz Müllers  Für Darwin  (Dallas trans. 1869). The book, an
  • creation, if he is not completely staggered after reading y r  essay’. The work received a
  • whole meeting was decidedly Huxleys answer to D r  M c Cann. He literally poured boiling oil
  • and broadening the forums in which Darwinism was discussed. John Murray brought out the first issue
  • that to me would have been a pleasing sight’ ( letter to John Murray, [after 18 September 1869] ). …

Scientific Practice

Summary

Specialism|Experiment|Microscopes|Collecting|Theory Letter writing is often seen as a part of scientific communication, rather than as integral to knowledge making. This section shows how correspondence could help to shape the practice of science, from…

Matches: 14 hits

  • … | Microscopes | Collecting | Theory Letter writing is often seen as a part of …
  • … the work of collecting, and the construction of theory. Darwin was not simply a gentleman naturalist …
  • … of the most advanced laboratory methods and equipment. Darwin used letters as a speculative space, …
  • … Specialism and Detail Darwin is usually thought of as a gentleman naturalist and a …
  • … across and drew together different fields of knowledge. But Darwin also made substantial …
  • … discussion was often the starting point for some of Darwin's most valuable and enduring …
  • … with detailed correspondence about barnacles. Letter 1514 — Darwin, C. R. to Huxley, T. …
  • … of one idea. – cirripedes morning & night.” Letter 1480 — Darwin, C. R. to Huxley, …
  • … than Huxley thinks. Letter 1592 — Darwin, C. R. to Huxley, T. H., 13 Sept [1854] …
  • … experimentation. Letter 4895 — Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J. F. T., 20 Sept [1865] …
  • Letter 5429 — Müller, J. F. T. to Darwin, C. R., 4 Mar 1867 Müller reports observations on …
  • Letter 5480 — Müller, J. F. T. to Darwin, C. R., 1 Apr 1867 Müller cites cases of difference …
  • … 5551 — Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J. F. T., 26 May [1867] Darwin thanks Müller for information …
  • … Ross's forthcoming expedition to the Arctic in search of Sir John Franklin. Letter

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 24 hits

  • Charles Darwins observations on the development of his children,[1began the
  • is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the
  • lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on
  • the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwins notes reveals, he closely
  • William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are
  • The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwins character clearly perceived by Emma during
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6For in these notes, Darwins deep scientific curiosity transcends his
  • that on occasion he refers to William asit’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate
  • memories.[8Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwins scientific goal, the notes here
  • the record breaks off until January 1852, by which time the Darwin family had increased by five: …
  • the onset of frowning, smiling, etc., as was the focus of Darwins attention on William and Anne, …
  • of logical thought and language. On 20 May 1854, Darwin again took over the notebook and, …
  • all the notes until July 1856, when the observations ceased. Darwins later entries, like Emmas, …
  • of muscles, without a corresponding sensation. D r . Holland[12informs me children do not
  • our door N o  12 and N o  11 is in the slit for the Letter box.— he decidedly ran past N o  11
  • has learned them from my sometimes changing the first letter in any word he is usingthus I say
  • trowsers. Emma one morning put on an unconspicuous bonnet of C. Langton,[52W. instantly observed
  • she added an s to the end of every wordEttis & Bettis &c afterwards all the ws were turned
  • ded pace”. “Us goed dawn to the willage”. Fish for Smith. Kaw for cow. &c. Lenny[612 years old
  • any thing with my egg. Miss Th. Shall I cut up y r  meat? L. I dont care whether you do or
  • … “But I could not help it”— I saidLenny you c d  help it, dont say that”. “I could not help it a
  • Huntsmen in red coat & white breeches jumping over the Hedges &c &c. I saidOh Lenny
  • … , pp. 1312. [6Correspondence  vol. 2, letter from Emma Wedgwood, [23 January 1839] . …
  • … (Wedgwood and Wedgwood 1980, facing p. 34). [32John Allen Wedgwood, vicar of Maer. …