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Darwin in letters, 1882: Nothing too great or too small

Summary

In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the previous October, and for the first time in decades he was not working on another book. He remained active in botanical research, however. Building on his recent studies in plant…

Matches: 20 hits

  • In 1882, Darwin reached his 74th year Earthworms had been published the
  • for scientific colleagues or their widows facing hardship. Darwin had suffered from poor health
  • … ‘I feel a very old man, & my course is nearly run’ ( letter to Lawson Tait, 13 February 1882 ) …
  • of his scientific friends quickly organised a campaign for Darwin to have greater public recognition
  • Botanical observation and experiment had long been Darwins greatest scientific pleasure. The year
  • fertility of crosses between differently styled plants ( letter from Fritz Müller, 1 January 1882
  • working at the effects of Carbonate of Ammonia on roots,’ Darwin wrote, ‘the chief result being that
  • for some hours in a weak solution of C. of Ammonia’. Darwins interest in root response and the
  • François Marie Glaziou (see Correspondence vol. 28, letter from Arthur de Souza Corrêa, 20
  • quite untirable & I am glad to shirk any extra labour’ ( letter to G. J. Romanes, 6 January
  • probably intending to test its effects on chlorophyll ( letter to Joseph Fayrer, 30 March 1882 ). …
  • one plant or animal!’ ( letter to Henry Groves, 3 April 1882 ). He wrote to an American in Kansas
  • the flowers & experimentising on them’ ( letter to J. E. Todd, 10 April 1882 ). While
  • and aGlycerin Pepsin mixture’ (letters to W. W. Baxter, 11 March 1882 and 18 March [1882 ]) …
  • he is a good deal depressed about himself’ (letter from H. E. Litchfield to G. H. Darwin, 17 March
  • is very calm but she has cried a little’ (letter from H. E. Litchfield to G. H. Darwin, [19 April
  • overflowing in tenderness’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, 10 May 1882 (DAR 219.1: 150)). …
  • he had witnessed an earthquake in 1835 ( letter from R. E. Alison, [MarchJuly 1835 ]). …
  • without any mercy’ ( letter from Emma Wedgwood to F. E. E. Wedgwood, [28 October 1836] , letter
  • pains)… would be very interesting to me’ ( letter to E. W. V. Harcourt, 24 June [1856] ). In a

Darwin on race and gender

Summary

Darwin’s views on race and gender are intertwined, and mingled also with those of class. In Descent of man, he tried to explain the origin of human races, and many of the differences between the sexes, with a single theory: sexual selection. Sexual…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Darwins views on race and gender are intertwined, and mingled also with
  • in beetles. The unity of human species Darwin believed that the same process of sexual
  • gradually increase those features over long periods of time. Darwins theory was based partly on the
  • seemed to prevail across the globe. In Descent , Darwin also addressed widely held beliefs
  • ofspecies’, ‘varieties’, andraces’. Darwin argued forcefully for the unity of the human species, …
  • Gender and civilisation In his early notebooks, Darwin remarked that survival value or
  • … , B74). In his later writings on plants and animals, Darwin remained consistent on this point, and
  • improvement, or design. However, when it came to humans, Darwin reintroduced the structure of
  • and present, on the basis of theircivilization’. Here Darwin drew on contemporary anthropology, …
  • colonial conquests and expansion abroad. Thus, while Darwins views on race differed widely
  • in the success of nations’ ( Descent 1: 239). For Darwin, the civilising process was essentially
  • men, and of non-European peoples becomingcivilized’ (i.e. European). Of the three Yahgans who had
  • … ( Beagle diary , p. 143). He was delighted to receive a letter from an African correspondent
  • and Progress Key letters: Letter to J. S. Henslow, 11 April 1833
  • Press. Desmond, Adrian and James Moore. 2009. Darwin's sacred cause . London: Allen
  • Correspondence with women Key letters : Letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 17 hits

  • … Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those …
  • … a broad variety of women had access to, and engaged with, Darwin's published works. A set of …
  • … Were women a target audience? Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • … that his views are original and will appeal to the public. Darwin asks Murray to forward the …
  • … her to read to check that she can understand it. Letter 7312 - Darwin to Darwin, F. …
  • … from all but educated, typically-male readers. Letter 7124 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E …
  • … he seeks her help with tone and style. Letter 7329 - Murray , J. to Darwin, [28 …
  • … in order to minimise impeding general perusal. Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, …
  • … he uses to avoid ownership of indelicate content. Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to …
  • … so as not to lose the interest of women. Letter 8341 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, …
  • Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November 1872] Ann Cupples asks …
  • … readership Letter 5391 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [6 February 1867] …
  • … Society . Letter 6551 - Becker, L. E . to Darwin, [13 January 1869] …
  • Letter 7651 - Wedgwood, F. J. to Darwin, H. E., [1 April 1871] Frances Wedgwood …
  • … might be suitable. Letter 7411 - Pfeiffer, E. J. to Darwin, [before 26 April 1871] …
  • Letter 13650 Kennard, C. A. to Darwin, [28 January 1882] Caroline Kennard responds …
  • … Variation Letter 5712 - Dallas, W. S. to Darwin, [8 December 1867] …

Darwin in letters, 1881: Old friends and new admirers

Summary

In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began writing about all the eminent men he had met. He embarked on this task, which formed an addition to his autobiography, because he had nothing else to do. He had…

Matches: 23 hits

  • In May 1881, Darwin, one of the best-known celebrities in England if not the world, began
  • a very old man, who probably will not last much longer.’ Darwins biggest fear was not death, but
  • sweetest place on this earth’. From the start of the year, Darwin had his demise on his mind. He
  • provision for the dividing of his wealth after his death. Darwins gloominess was compounded by the
  • and new admirers got in touch, and, for all his fears, Darwin found several scientific topics to
  • Evolution old and new when revising his essay on Erasmus Darwins scientific work, and that Darwin
  • in Unconscious memory in November 1880 and in an abusive letter about Darwin in the St Jamess
  • memory in Kosmos and sent Darwin a separate letter for publication in the Journal of Popular
  • publishers decided to print500 more, making 2000’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 4 January 1881 ) …
  • … & very surprising the whole case is to me’ (letters to W. E. Darwin, 31 January [1881] and
  • the animal learnt from its own individual experience ( letter from G. J. Romanes, 7 March 1881 ). …
  • whether observations of their behaviour were trustworthy ( letter to Francis Galton, 8 March [1881] …
  • about the sale of books beinga game of chance’ ( letter to R. F. Cooke, 12 April 1881 ). On 18
  • for more suggestions of such plants, especially annuals ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 21 March
  • supposed he would feelless sulky in a day or two’ ( letter to R. F. Cooke, 29 July 1881 ). The
  • dead a work falls at this late period of the season’ ( letter from R. F. Cooke, 30 July 1881 ). …
  • with you’, a Swedish teacher told him ( letter from C. E. Södling, 14 October 1881 ), while H. M. …
  • little, to the general stock of knowledge’ ( letter to E. W. Bok, 10 May 1881 ). Josef Popper, an
  • vol. 30, letter to C. A. Kennard, 9 January 1882 ). ‘I sometimes receive so many
  • of the nature & capabilities of the Fuegians’ ( letter to W. P. Snow, 22 November 1881 ). …
  • … ‘not absurd for one with no pretensions’ (l etter from W. E. Darwin, 13 January [1881 ]), Darwin
  • after expressing their wish to visit Darwin ( letter from E. B. Aveling, 27 September [1881] ). …
  • Nature published the day after Darwins death in April 1882. Deaths, gifts and legacies

Diagrams and drawings in letters

Summary

Over 850 illustrations from the printed volumes of The Correspondence of Charles Darwin have been added to the online transcripts of the letters. The contents include maps, diagrams, drawings, sketches and photographs, covering geological, botanical,…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … Forbes's "Atlantis" theory,  [25 February 1846] E. A. Darwin's …
  • … containing bud samples,  12 May 1878 G. H. Darwin's drawings of  Thalia dealbata  …
  • … of germination in Megarrhiza californica , enclosed in a letter from Asa Gray,   4 April 1880 …
  • … plants",  Collected papers  2: 236–56],  22 February 1882

Referencing women’s work

Summary

Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, but whether and how they were acknowledged in print involved complex considerations of social standing, professional standing, and personal preference.…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, …
  • standing, and personal preferenceGeorge Romanes in his 1882 publication Animal intelligence
  • set of selected letters is followed by letters relating to Darwin's 1881 publication
  • work are referenced throughout Variation . Letter 2395 - Darwin to Holland, …
  • her identity is both anonymised and masculinised. Letter 3316 - Darwin to Nevill, D
  • Nevill is referenced by name for herkindnessin Darwins Fertilisation of Orchids . …
  • are identified only asfriends in Surrey”. Letter 4794 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [25
  • Sir C. Lyellor received fromMiss. B”. Letter 7060 - Wedgwood, F. J. to
  • was referenced in the final publication. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C
  • are not cited in Expression . Letter 5817 - Darwin to Huxley, T. H., …
  • description of a crying baby in Mary Barton. Letter 8321 - Darwin to
  • he wouldfeel the public hummingat him. Letter 7345 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, …
  • lady, on whose accuracy I can implicitly rely”. Letter 8427 - Darwin to Litchfield H
  • of Henriettas considerable editorial input. Letter 8719 - Darwin to Treat, M., [1
  • … . Letter 12745 - Darwin to Wedgwood, K. E. S., [8 October 1880] Darwin
  • Letter 13037 - Darwin to Darwin, W. E., [5 February 1881] Darwin discusses

Science: A Man’s World?

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth-century women participated in the world of science, be it as experimenters, observers, editors, critics, producers, or consumers. Despite this, much of the…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Discussion Questions | Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth
  • Letters Darwins Notes On Marriage [April - July 1838] In these notes, …
  • theories, & accumulating facts in silence & solitude”. Darwin also comments that he has
  • an hourwith poor Mrs. Lyell sitting by”. Letter 3715 - Claparède, J. L. R. A. E. to
  • whose attractions are not those of her sex”. Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [12-13
  • her own steam and is afirst rate critic”. Letter 4377 - Haeckel, E. P. A. to Darwin, …
  • ornaments in the making of feminine works”. Letter 4441 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [30
  • the young, especially ladies, to study nature. Letter 4940 - Cresy, E. to Darwin, E., …
  • Anderson isneither masculine nor pedantic”. Letter 6976 - Darwin to Blackwell, A. B., …
  • to him as a published science author, is a man. Letter 7314 - Kovalevsky, S. to Darwin, …
  • Theoriae Functionum Ellipticarum , (1829). Letter 7329 - Murray, J. to Darwin, [28
  • to prick up what little is left of them ears”. Letter 8055 - Hennell, S. S. to Darwin, …
  • almost out of a womans natural thinking”. Letter 8079 - Norton, S. R. to Darwin, [20
  • read the pamphlet herself. Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [16 May 1872] …
  • to women. Letter 10746Darwin to Dicey, E. M., [1877] Darwin gives his
  • Letter 13607Darwin to Kennard, C. A., [9 January 1882] Darwin responds to Caroline

Darwin in letters, 1878: Movement and sleep

Summary

In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to the movements of plants. He investigated the growth pattern of roots and shoots, studying the function of specific organs in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of…

Matches: 26 hits

  • … lessen injury to leaves from radiation In 1878, Darwin devoted most of his attention to …
  • … in this process. Working closely with his son Francis, Darwin devised a series of experiments to …
  • … plant laboratories in Europe. While Francis was away, Darwin delighted in his role as …
  • … from botanical research was provided by potatoes, as Darwin took up the cause of an Irish …
  • … would rid Ireland of famine. Several correspondents pressed Darwin for his views on religion, …
  • … closed with remarkable news of a large legacy bequeathed to Darwin by a stranger as a reward for his …
  • … Hooker, ‘or as far as I know any scientific man’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 14 December [1878] ). …
  • … Expression ), and the final revision of Origin (1872), Darwin had turned almost exclusively to …
  • … Movement in plants In the spring of 1878, Darwin started to focus on the first shoots and …
  • … were enrolled as researchers, as were family members. Darwin asked his niece Sophy to observe …
  • … or arched.… Almost all seedlings come up arched’ ( letter to Sophy Wedgwood, 24 March [1878–80] ). …
  • … on one side, then another, to produce movement in the stalk. Darwin compared adult and young leaves …
  • … after growth has ceased or nearly ceased.’ Finally, Darwin turned to plant motion below the …
  • … precision the lines of least resistance in the ground.’ Darwin would devote a whole chapter to the …
  • … when he finds out that he missed sensitiveness of apex’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, [11 May 1878] …
  • Darwin complained. ‘I am ashamed at my blunder’ ( letter to John Tyndall, 22 December [1878] ). …
  • … accursed German language: Sachs is very kind to him’ ( letter to W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 18 June …
  • … have nobody to talk to, about my work, I scribble to you ( letter to Francis Darwin, 7 [July 1878] …
  • … but it is horrid not having you to discuss it with’ ( letter to Francis Darwin, 20 [July 1878] ). …
  • … determine whether they had chlorophyll, Francis reported ( letter from Francis Darwin, [after 7 …
  • … ‘There is one machine we must have’, Francis wrote ( letter from Francis Darwin, [before 17 July …
  • … ‘He seems to me to jump to conclusions rather’ ( letter from Francis Darwin, [before 3 August 1878] …
  • … the pot-plant every day & never the bedded out one’ ( letter from Francis Darwin, [after 7 July …
  • … ‘I have borrowed Cieselski & read him,’ he reported ( letter from Francis Darwin, [22 June 1878 …
  • … who was delighted, and eventually published them in his 1882 book Animal intelligence . ‘Like the …
  • … him of the soundness of London property ( letter from W. E. Darwin, 13 December [1878] ). ‘This is …

Darwin in letters, 1877: Flowers and honours

Summary

Ever since the publication of Expression, Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The year 1877 was no exception. The spring and early summer were spent completing Forms of flowers, his fifth book on a botanical topic. He then turned to the…

Matches: 27 hits

  • Ever since the publication of Expression , Darwins research had centred firmly on botany. The
  • of these projects would culminate in a major publication. Darwins botany was increasingly a
  • assisted his fathers research on movement and bloom, and Darwin in turn encouraged his sons own
  • The year 1877 was more than usually full of honours. Darwin received two elaborate photograph albums
  • from Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands. Closer to home, Darwin received an honorary Doctorate of
  • sites for possible earthworm activity. Now in his 69th year, Darwin remained remarkably productive, …
  • no controversy. In his autobiographical reflections, Darwin remarked: ‘no little discovery of
  • … (‘Recollections’, p. 419). During the winter and spring, Darwin was busy preparing the manuscript of
  • and presented to the Linnean Society of London. In the book, Darwin adopted the more recent term
  • of respect and affection’. He hinted as much in his letter of 4 June : ‘you will see I have done
  • value, it is not likely that more than a few hundred copies w d . be sold’. His publisher knew
  • to Down if it lay in my power and you thought it w d . help you.’ ‘I declare had it not been for
  • have shared Hookers suspicion of ambitious gardeners ( letter from W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, 25 August
  • method of recording leaf motion for extended periods. In a letter to Thiselton-Dyer of 11 October
  • … … tap one of the young leaves with a delicate twig’ ( letter to R. I. Lynch, 14 September 1877 ). …
  • … , or to the vibratory flagella of some Infusoria’ ( letter from F. J. Cohn, 5 August 1877 ). …
  • in July 1877 (F. Darwin 1877b), and Darwin sent Cohns letter vindicating his sons research to
  • Die Seele des Kindes (The mind of the child; Preyer 1882), based partly on observations of his son
  • copies of Kosmos covering the German debate (letters to W. E. Gladstone, 2 October 1877 and
  • his sense of form and of motion was exact and lively’ ( letter from W. E. Gladstone, 23 October
  • the Westphalian Provincial Society for Science and Art. In a letter to Darwin written before 16
  • found him as soft & smooth as butter’ ( letter to C. E. Norton, 16 March 1877 ). Hooker was
  • the gospel of dirt the order of the day’ ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 27 January [1877] ).  Carlyle
  • study of medical monstrosity ( letter from C. T. E. Siebold, 10 October 1877 ). An American banker
  • blood and thus keep back our civilization’ ( letter from W. B. Bowles, 17 May 1877 ). Bowles
  • to hide the absence of humanity beneath’ ( letter from W. B. Bowles, 18 May 1877 ). More
  • exhibit is in many cases purely physical’ ( letter from W. M. Moorsom, 10 September 1877 ). Darwin

2.7 Joseph Moore, Midland Union medal

Summary

< Back to Introduction The Midland Union was an association of natural history societies and field clubs across the Midland counties, intended to facilitate – especially through its journal The Midland Naturalist – ‘the interchange of ideas’ and…

Matches: 10 hits

  • Unions annual meeting in July 1880 to award an annualDarwin Prizefor the best article submitted
  • which could include, if he chose, a specially designedDarwin medalin either gold or bronze. The
  • and useful work’. A Manchester Guardian article, ‘Darwin and local scientific societies’, …
  • figure, and there was added pride in his Midland origins. Darwins permission had been sought for
  • with characteristic kindness and absence of condescension. Darwin wrote, ‘their wish to name the
  • source of happiness throughout life’.The design of the Darwin medal was appropriately entrusted to
  • his own determined efforts. His bust-length portrayal of Darwin in three-quarter view, signed in
  • On the reverse an inscription runs round the edge: ‘The Darwin medal founded by the Midland Union of
  • gold or bronze  
 references and bibliography letter to E. W. Badger, [19 July 1880], DCP
  • 1880), p. 126. Bristol Mercury and Daily Post (22 April 1882), p. 6. Manchester Guardian (2

Casting about: Darwin on worms

Summary

Earthworms were the subject of a citizen science project to map the distribution of earthworms across Britain (BBC Today programme, 26 May 2014). The general understanding of the role earthworms play in improving soils and providing nutrients for plants to…

Matches: 12 hits

  • for plants to flourish can be traced back to the last book Darwin wrote, snappily-titled The
  • on their habits, which was published in 1881. Despite Darwins fears that a book on earthworms might
  • out in his Natural History of Selborne of 1789 (a book Darwin claimed hadmuch influence on my
  • a new field in natural history, and almost a century later Darwin argued that all fields had passed
  • variety of strange things he persuaded people to do. Darwin concluded that worms had no sense
  • a metal whistle and to being shouted at, but also to Francis Darwin playing the bassoon, and to Emma
  • realising that this negative evidence was also valuable to Darwin. Thomas Henry Farrer , …
  • existence of worms at that altitude. By the 1870s, Darwin was also drawing on the work of
  • him. Soon worm excrement was trusted to postal services, and Darwin acquired casts from India and
  • observations he had gathered to write a book on the subject. Darwin brought to the topic the
  • whole soul is absorbed with worms just at present!’ ( letter to W. T. Thiselton Dyer, 23 November
  • … ‘worms have much bigger souls than anyone wd suppose’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 31 January [1881] …

Movement in Plants

Summary

The power of movement in plants, published on 7 November 1880, was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which the assistance of one of his children, Francis Darwin, is mentioned on the title page. The research for this…

Matches: 26 hits

  • 7 November 1880was the final large botanical work that Darwin wrote. It was the only work in which
  • about their research while he was away from home. Although Darwin lacked a state of the art research
  • the advantages of both while Francis was working abroad. Darwin was privy to the inner workings of
  • methods and use the most advanced laboratory equipment. Darwin also benefitted from the instrument
  • that Francis had been introduced to at Würzburg. Darwin described his experimental practice
  • plant physiology, but it was at its core informed by Darwins theory of evolution, particularly by
  • early 1860s, at a time when his health was especially bad, Darwin had taken up the study of climbing
  • reproduced as a small book, giving it a much wider audience. Darwin was not the first naturalist to
  • which eventually appeared in 1875. In the same year, Darwin published a much longer work,  …
  • about the nature of movement, so much so, that at one point Darwin had considered combining the
  • digestive processes. With his final great botanical work, Darwin would attemptto bring all the
  • … , a plant that exhibited all three types of movement ( letter from RILynch, [before 28 July
  • the woodblock using photography for scientific accuracy ( letter from JDCooper13 December
  • lost colour, withered, and died within a couple of days ( letter from A. F. Batalin28 February
  • how their observations could have been so much at odds ( letter to Hugo de Vries 13 February 1879
  • the botanist Gaetano Durando, to find plants and seeds ( letter to Francis Darwin, [4 February8
  • only the regulator &amp; not cause of movement ’. In the same letter, Darwin discussed terminology, …
  • to replace FranksTransversal-Heliotropismus’ ( letter from WEDarwin10 February [1880] ). …
  • … ‘ I am very sorry that Sachs is so sceptical, for I w drather convert him than any other half
  • experiments and devised a new test, which he described in a letter to his mother, ‘ I did some
  • and it appeared in 1880 (F. Darwin 1880b). In the same letter, Francis revealed the frustration of
  • on holiday in the Lake District, Darwin received a long letter from De Vries detailing his latest
  • aslittle discsandgreenish bodies’ ( letter to WTThiselton-Dyer29 October 1879 ). …
  • that he had not been able to observe earlier ( letter to WTThiselton-Dyer20 November 1879 ). …
  • pay more for at the usual rate of charging per inch &amp;c they w dbe over £40’; he suggested
  • Nature  the day after his fathers death (F. Darwin 1882). Darwins study of plant movement went

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 25 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • of the books listed in the other two notebooks. Sometimes Darwin recorded that an abstract of the
  • own. Soon after beginning his first reading notebook, Darwin began to separate the scientific
  • the University of Cambridge. These works, catalogued by H. W. Rutherford ( Catalogue of the library
  • Prichard; a 3 d . vol [Prichard 183647] Lawrence [W. Lawrence 1819] read Bory S t
  • 1822] Falconers remark on the influence of climate [W. Falconer 1781] [DAR *119: 2v. …
  • 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian Islands 8 consult D r
  • … [Dampier 1697] Sportsmans repository 4 to . [W. H. Scott 1820]— contains much on dogs
  • of variation in animals in the different isl ds  of E Indian Archipelago— [DAR *119: 6v.] …
  • … [DAR *119: 8v.] A history of British Birds by W. Macgillivray [W. Macgillivray 183752].— I
  • … [Reimarius 1760] The Highlands &amp; Western Isl ds  letter to Sir W Scott [MacCulloch 1824
  • 2 vols. 8vo. avec 2 atlas 4to. ibid, 181823. £1 2 s  [E. Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire 181823] …
  • said to be Poor Sir. J. Edwards Botanical Tour [?J. E. Smith 1793] Fabricius (very old
  • at Maer.— Lives of Kepler &amp; Galileo. Drinkwater [J. E. Drinkwater] 1833]— Prof. …
  • on Aurochs [Weissenborn 1838] Smiths grammar [J. E. Smith 1821] &amp; introduct of Botany [J. …
  • 183440]: In Portfolio ofabstracts34  —letter from Skuckard of books on Silk Worm
  • M rs  Frys Life [Fry 1847] Horace Walpoles letter to C t . of Ossory [Walpole 1848] …
  • Asiatic Society ]—contains very little Macleays letter to D r  Fleming [Macleay 1830] …
  • … [Heer 1854].— Hooker has it.— Very important Hookers letter Jan. 1859 Yules Ava [Yule 1858] …
  • never read his works ( Calendar  no. 11875). In February 1882, however, after reading the
  • of the material from these portfolios is in DAR 205, the letter from William Edward Shuckard to