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Referencing women’s work

Summary

Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, but whether and how they were acknowledged in print involved complex considerations of social standing, professional standing, and personal preference.…

Matches: 16 hits

  • Darwin's correspondence shows that women made significant contributions to Darwin's work, …
  • … set of selected letters is followed by letters relating to Darwin's 1881 publication …
  • … work are referenced throughout Variation . Letter 2395 - Darwin to Holland, …
  • … her identity is both anonymised and masculinised. Letter 3316 - Darwin to Nevill, D …
  • … Darwin’s Fertilisation of Orchids . Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., …
  • … being acknowledged publicly as a science critic. Letter 4370 - Wedgwood, L. C. to …
  • … Surrey”. Letter 4794 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [25 March 1865] Darwin asks …
  • … final publication. Letter 7223 - Darwin to Wedgwood, L. C., [9 June 1867 - 72] …
  • … infants identified by name in Expression was novelist Elizabeth Gaskell for her description …
  • Letter 8321 - Darwin to Litchfield, H. E., [13 May 1872] Darwin consults his …
  • … the public humming” at him. Letter 7345 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [15 June 1872] …
  • Letter 8427 - Darwin to Litchfield H. E., [25 July 1872] Darwin thanks Henrietta for …
  • … relating to Earthworms Letter 7428 - Wedgwood, F. to Darwin, [4 January …
  • … 8168 - Ruck, A. R. to Darwin, H., [20 January 1872] Amy Ruck reports the results …
  • … 8193 - Ruck, A. R. to Darwin, H., [1 February 1872] Amy Ruck sends a second …
  • … worm castings . Letter 7345 - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, [15 June 1872] …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 24 hits

  • 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working
  • dispute over an anonymous review that attacked the work of Darwins son George dominated the second
  • and traveller Alexander von Humboldts 105th birthday, Darwin obliged with a reflection on his debt
  • be done by observation during prolonged intervals’ ( letter to D. T. Gardner, [ c . 27 August
  • pleasures of shooting and collecting beetles ( letter from W. D. Fox, 8 May [1874] ).  Such
  • Andone looks backwards much more than forwards’ ( letter to W. D. Fox, 11 May [1874] ). …
  • Andrew Clark, whom he had been consulting since August 1873. Darwin had originally thought that
  • was an illusory hope.— I feel very old & helpless’  ( letter to B. J. Sulivan, 6 January [1874] …
  • inferred that he was well from his silence on the matter ( letter from Ernst Haeckel, 26 October
  • in such rubbish’, he confided to Joseph Dalton Hooker ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18 January [1874] …
  • séance was held at the home of Darwins cousin Hensleigh Wedgwood. Those present included George
  • that Mr Williams wasa cheat and an imposter’ ( letter from T. H. Huxley, 27 January 1874 ). …
  • his, ‘& that he was thus free to perform his antics’ ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 29 January [1874
  • Darwin had alloweda spirit séanceat his home ( letter from T. G. Appleton, 2 April 1874 ). …
  • for the book may have been increased by the publication in 1872 of  Corals and coral islands , by
  • …  vol. 20, letter to St G. J. Mivart, 11 January [1872] ). To Darwins relief, Murray replied
  • …  vol. 20, letter to Hubert Airy, 24 August 1872 ). The passage took twelve weeks aboard the
  • in a few hours dissolve the hardest cartilage, bone & meat &c. &c.’ ( letter to W. D. …
  • with extracts from a dogs stomach ( letter from T. L. Brunton, 28 February 1874 ), and Edward
  • whether at theclose of the putrefaction of flesh, skin &c, any substance is produced before
  • details of an Australian variety of sundew ( letter from T. C. Copland, 23 June 1874 ). …
  • the face, with a physiological explanation ( letter from T. L. Brunton, [29] October [1874] ). …
  • letter John Murray, 9 May [1874] ). He communicated Mary Elizabeth Barbers paper on the pupae of
  • head that M r  Spencers terms of equilibration &c always bother me & make everything less

Science: A Man’s World?

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth-century women participated in the world of science, be it as experimenters, observers, editors, critics, producers, or consumers. Despite this, much of the…

Matches: 17 hits

  • Discussion Questions | Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth
  • Letters Darwins Notes On Marriage [April - July 1838] In these notes, …
  • theories, & accumulating facts in silence & solitude”. Darwin also comments that he has
  • an hourwith poor Mrs. Lyell sitting by”. Letter 3715 - Claparède, J. L. R. A. E. to
  • whose attractions are not those of her sex”. Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [12-13
  • her own steam and is afirst rate critic”. Letter 4377 - Haeckel, E. P. A. to Darwin, …
  • ornaments in the making of feminine works”. Letter 4441 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [30
  • the young, especially ladies, to study nature. Letter 4940 - Cresy, E. to Darwin, E., …
  • Anderson isneither masculine nor pedantic”. Letter 6976 - Darwin to Blackwell, A. B., …
  • to him as a published science author, is a man. Letter 7314 - Kovalevsky, S. to Darwin, …
  • Theoriae Functionum Ellipticarum , (1829). Letter 7329 - Murray, J. to Darwin, [28
  • to prick up what little is left of them ears”. Letter 8055 - Hennell, S. S. to Darwin, …
  • almost out of a womans natural thinking”. Letter 8079 - Norton, S. R. to Darwin, [20
  • Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [16 May 1872] Reade tells Darwin of his plans to
  • Letter 8341 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [20 May 1872] Reade tells Darwin of his
  • flood”. Letter 13414 - Darwin to Harrison, L., [18 October 1881] Darwin
  • patience. Letter 13607Darwin to Kennard, C. A., [9 January 1882] Darwin

Darwin’s observations on his children

Summary

Charles Darwin’s observations on the development of his children, began the research that culminated in his book The Expression of the emotions in man and animals, published in 1872, and his article ‘A biographical sketch of an infant’, published in Mind…

Matches: 27 hits

  • Charles Darwins observations on the development of his children,[1began the
  • of the emotions in man and animals , published in 1872, and his articleA biographical sketch of
  • is available below . As with much of his other work, Darwin gathered additional information on the
  • lunatics, the blind, and animals. And as early as 1839 Darwin had begun to collect information on
  • the expression of emotions. As the following transcript of Darwins notes reveals, he closely
  • William Erasmus, the stages of his development suggesting to Darwin those expressions which are
  • The tone of the manuscript reflects an aspect of Darwins character clearly perceived by Emma during
  • … “What does that prove”.’[6For in these notes, Darwins deep scientific curiosity transcends his
  • that on occasion he refers to William asit’. Darwin possessed the ability to dissociate
  • memories.[8Yet, though the dissociation was essential for Darwins scientific goal, the notes here
  • until September 1844. Parallels in the development of Anne Elizabeth, born 2 March 1841, were also
  • had increased by five: George Howard, born 9 July 1845; Elizabeth, born 8 July 1847; Francis, born
  • was called.— 29 th . Cried at the sight of Allen Wedgwood[32Is able to catch hold of a
  • our door N o  12 and N o  11 is in the slit for the Letter box.— he decidedly ran past N o  11
  • has learned them from my sometimes changing the first letter in any word he is usingthus I say
  • 35  & to take a crust, when their pudding was finished.— Elizabeth[45remarked him careful
  • trowsers. Emma one morning put on an unconspicuous bonnet of C. Langton,[52W. instantly observed
  • flower garden perceived them, said they were not Dzivers (Elizabeths) flowers. ie were not natural
  • very contradictory; by mistake he one day graciously gave Elizabeth a kiss, but repenting said
  • she added an s to the end of every wordEttis & Bettis &c afterwards all the ws were turned
  • goed dawn to the willage”. Fish for Smith. Kaw for cow. &c. Lenny[612 years old speaks
  • PapaWell Lenny how do you like Eastbourne  L. (nodding towards the sea) I like that pond best  …
  • … “But I could not help it”— I saidLenny you c d  help it, dont say that”. “I could not help it a
  • … , pp. 1312. [6Correspondence  vol. 2, letter from Emma Wedgwood, [23 January 1839] . …
  • to Anne and Henrietta were added considerably later; Anne Elizabeth was born in 1841 and Henrietta
  • by Emma Darwin. [29Caroline Sarah Wedgwood, Elizabeth (Bessy) Wedgwood, and Josiah Wedgwood
  • by CD or Emma Darwin. It is perhaps in the hand of Sarah Elizabeth (Elizabeth) Wedgwood who, …

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 25 hits

  • In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to
  • … (DAR 119) opens with five pages of text copied from Notebook C and carries on through 1851; the
  • used these notebooks extensively in dating and annotating Darwins letters; the full transcript
  • … *128). For clarity, the transcript does not record Darwins alterations. The spelling and
  • book had been consulted. Those cases where it appears that Darwin made a genuine deletion have been
  • a few instances, primarily in theBooks Readsections, Darwin recorded that a work had been
  • to be Read [DAR *119: Inside Front Cover] C. Darwin June 1 st . 1838
  • de la Folie des Animaux de ses Rapports avec celle de lHomme,” by Dr. Pierquin, published in Paris
  • …  [Pierquin de Gembloux 1839]. Said to be good by D r  L. Lindsay 5 [DAR *119: 1v.] …
  • Cuvier 1822] read Flourens Edit [Flourens 1845] read L. Jenyns paper on Annals of Nat. Hist. …
  • … [DAR *119: 2v.] Whites regular gradation in man [C. White 1799] Lindleys
  • 8 vo  p 181 [Latreille 1819]. see p. 17 Note Book C. for reference to authors about E. Indian
  • Hist. genérale et Particulière des Anomalies de lorganization des hommes & des Animaux by Isid. …
  • of the Agricultural Association meeting at Oxford. paper by L d  Spencer on gestation of animals
  • … [Reimarius 1760] The Highlands & Western Isl ds  letter to Sir W Scott [MacCulloch 1824
  • … “Resume analytique des observations par F. Cuvier sur linstinct”—LInstitut 1839. p. 408 [Flourens
  • 183440]: In Portfolio ofabstracts34  —letter from Skuckard of books on Silk Worm
  • M rs  Frys Life [Fry 1847] Horace Walpoles letter to C t . of Ossory [Walpole 1848] …
  • Asiatic Society ]—contains very little Macleays letter to D r  Fleming [Macleay 1830] …
  • th . Humes Hist of England [Hume 1763]. to beginning of Elizabeth. Sept 14 th . 4 first
  • … [Heer 1854].— Hooker has it.— Very important Hookers letter Jan. 1859 Yules Ava [Yule 1858] …
  • on chemistry (Liebig 1851). 50  Probably Elizabeth Wedgwood. 51  This
  • of the   Devereux, Earls of Essex, in the reigns of Elizabeth, James I.,   and Charles I., 1540
  • of England from the   fall of Wolsey to the death of Elizabeth.  12 vols. London. 185670128: …
  • of wheat . Jersey and London. [Darwin Library; 2d ed. (1872) also in Darwin Library.]  *119: 7v.; …