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To Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette   [before 6 March 1847]

Summary

Corrects a misunderstanding of his description of salt deposits [in South America, pp. 74–5]. The salt referred to was from Rio Negro, and was coarsely crystallised and free of other saline substances found in sea-salt. CD believes its lesser value in curing meat is owing to the absence of muriates of lime and magnesia and suggests that it might be worth while to add them to the Rio Negro salt.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 6 Mar 1847]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 10, 6 March 1847, pp. 157–8
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1069

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   3 January [1877]

Summary

Suggests that the scarcity of holly berries is owing to the scarcity of bees during the spring, rather than to frost. He does not know what caused the scarcity of bees.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  3 Jan [1877]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle, 6 January 1877, p. 19
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-10769

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   17 January [1877]

Summary

CD confesses his error with respect to the cause of the scarcity of holly berries. It appears that several causes in combination have led to it. CD still believes rarity of bees played a part, though a subordinate one.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  17 Jan [1877]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle, 20 January 1877, p. 83
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-10797

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   19 February [1877]

Summary

Replies to some of George Henslow’s criticisms [of Cross and self-fertilisation] made in his article ["Fertilisation of plants", Gard. Chron. n.s. 7 (1877): 203–4].

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  19 Feb [1877]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle, 24 February 1877, p. 246
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-10854

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 10 January 1852]

Summary

Asks readers of Gardeners’ Chronicle whether they have experience with light wire rope instead of chain in drawing water buckets from deep wells. Describes the problem of his own well with its 325 foot chain.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 10 Jan 1852]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 2, 10 January 1852, p. 22
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1470

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [c. 27 April 1853]

Summary

Solicits information about the kind of syphon required to convey water from a proposed large water tank to existing smaller ones.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [c. 27 Apr 1853]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 19, 7 May 1853, p. 302
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1516A

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   11 April [1855]

Summary

CD describes his experiments on the effects on germination of the immersion of seeds in sea-water. Hopes to throw light on the distribution of plants. Asks readers of Gardeners’ Chronicle to inform him whether such experiments have already been tried and what class or species of seeds they suppose would be particularly liable to be killed by sea-water.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  11 Apr [1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 15, 14 April 1855, p. 242
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1666

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   21 May [1855]

Summary

Reports on his experiments on action of sea-water on seeds and the bearing of his investigations on the theory of centres of creation and Edward Forbes’s theory of continental extensions to account for distribution of organic forms. CD’s experiments confirm germination powers were retained after 42 days’ immersion by seven out of eight kinds of seeds.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  21 May [1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 21, 26 May 1855, pp. 356–7
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1684

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 26 May 1855]

Summary

Will be obliged if any reader can provide eggs of lizard Lacerta agilis. Wants to ascertain whether they float in sea-water. Offers reward of a few shillings to boys for collecting.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 26 May 1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 21, 26 May 1855, p. 360
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1686A

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 21 July 1855]

Summary

Reports on observing hive-bees visiting the leaves of vetch and bean and sucking the minute drops of nectar secreted by the glands on the underside of the stipulae. This phenomenon proves wrong those botanists who believe nectar to be a special secretion for the sole purpose of luring insects to visit flowers and thus to aid in their fertilisation.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 21 July 1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 29, 21 July 1855, p. 487
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1723

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 3 November 1855]

Summary

CD requests further details about a rain of shells on the Isle of Wight reported by a Gardeners’ Chronicle correspondent.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 3 Nov 1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 44, 3 November 1855, p. 726
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1771

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   13 November [1855]

Summary

Reports a case of charlock seeds that retained their vitality for at least eight or nine years. He suggests that their power of retaining vitality when buried in damp soil may be an element in preserving the species and therefore seeds may be specially endowed with this capacity, while the power of retaining vitality in dry, artificial conditions may be an indirect accidental quality of little or no use to the species.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  13 Nov [1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 46, 17 November 1855, p. 758
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1780

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   21 November [1855]

Summary

Sends final results of his experiments on the vitality of various kinds of seeds immersed in sea-water. Corrects a false assumption he made in an earlier letter [1684] that plants with ripe seeds would float for some weeks. Now finds that they sink within a month. Since all the seeds he tried sank in sea-water, his experiments are of little or no use "in regard to the distribution of plants by drifting of their seeds across the sea".

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  21 Nov [1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 47, 24 November 1855, p. 773
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1783

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 1 December 1855]

Summary

Corrects a misprint in his letter [1783].

Adds that his experiments show that one cannot infer from the vitality of seeds under dry conditions that they will be preserved in different conditions. Cites the poor ability of Leguminosae to withstand immersion.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 1 Dec 1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 48, 1 December 1855, p. 789
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1787

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 29 December 1855]

Summary

Cites [from Gärtner’s Bastarderzeugung (1849), p. 157] a report that seeds from graves of ancient Gauls germinated.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 29 Dec 1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 52, 29 December 1855, p. 854
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1802

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 29 December 1855]

Summary

CD requests accurate information on the extent to which the different varieties of fruit-trees produce seedlings like their parents. Do some varieties of pears and apples tend to produce truer offspring than other varieties?

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 29 Dec 1855]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, no. 52, 29 December 1855, p. 854
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-1803

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 6 December 1856]

Summary

CD is collecting all the evidence he can on natural crossing of varieties of plants. Asks readers of Gardeners’ Chronicle to give evidence "showing either that Leguminous crops, when grown close together do sometimes cross or on the other hand that they may invariably be grown close together without any chance of deterioration".

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 6 Dec 1856]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 6 December 1856, p. 806
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2012

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [after 28 February 1857]

Summary

Reports that he fertilised a single pale red carnation with the pollen of a crimson Spanish pink, and a Spanish pink with the pollen of the same carnation. He got seed from both crosses and raised many seedlings. There was no difference between the seedlings from reciprocal crosses, not one plant set a single seed.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [after 28 Feb 1857]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 7 March 1857, p. 155
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2061

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 13 June 1857]

Summary

Requests information from readers on breeding of dun or mouse-coloured ponies with a dark stripe down their backs. Must one or both parents be dun?

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 13 June 1857]
Classmark:  Gloucestershire Archives (T. C. Morton deposit D1021/8/4)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2105

To Gardeners’ Chronicle   [before 25 July 1857]

Summary

CD has saved an enormous amount of labour since he replaced the chain on his deep well with wire rope. He now asks readers whether they have had experience of saving on the weight of the bucket by using some material other than oak.

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Gardeners’ Chronicle
Date:  [before 25 July 1857]
Classmark:  Gardeners’ Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette, 25 July 1857, p. 518
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-2127
Document type
letter (52)
Author
Addressee
Date
1841 (1)
1843 (1)
1844 (4)
1847 (1)
1852 (1)
1853 (1)
1855 (10)
1856 (1)
1857 (5)
1858 (1)
1860 (4)
1861 (5)
1862 (1)
1863 (4)
1864 (1)
1866 (3)
1868 (2)
1869 (2)
1871 (1)
1877 (3)
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