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To George Cupples   7 June [1873]

Summary

Thanks for report on J. V. Carus’ lecture.

Glad to hear suspicion about J. H. Stirling groundless.

CD has not seen R. W. Emerson. In last two or three years has seen several Yankees. Saw a good deal of the Nortons [Charles Eliot and Susan Ridley Sedgwick].

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  George Cupples
Date:  7 June [1873]
Classmark:  American Philosophical Society (Mss.B.D25.428)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-8936

From Anton Dohrn   7 June 1873

Summary

News of Naples Zoological Station developments.

His remarks on physiology in the Academy were aimed at Prof. Ludwig and his school.

The usual "exact" methods in experimental physiology want only a little pushing to put an end to superstition.

Recounts how he had worked out the explanation of Rhizocephala morphology via the Anelasma – an example of both the power of inheritance and the power of genealogical investigation. R. Kossman’s work has now confirmed AD’s explanation.

Author:  Felix Anton (Anton) Dohrn
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  7 June 1873
Classmark:  DAR 162: 213
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-8937

From A. A. L. P. Cochrane   7 June 1873

Summary

Invites CD on a voyage to the western coast of North and South America.

Author:  Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane
Addressee:  Charles Robert Darwin
Date:  7 June 1873
Classmark:  DAR 161: 191
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-8938

To A. A. L. P. Cochrane   [after 7 June 1873]

Summary

Is obliged because of health to decline the invitation [see 8938] to make a voyage on the Admiral’s ship. "… I must rest contented with past memories …"

Author:  Charles Robert Darwin
Addressee:  Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane
Date:  [after 7 June 1873]
Classmark:  Sotheby’s (dealers) (20–1 July 1988)
Letter no:  DCP-LETT-8938A
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A tale of two bees

Summary

Darwinian evolution theory fundamentally changed the way we understand the environment and even led to the coining of the word 'ecology'. Darwin was fascinated by bees: he devised experiments to study the comb-building technique of honey bees and…

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  • … In the unseasonably warm weather of March 2012, one of the Darwin Correspondence Project editors …
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