skip to content

Darwin Correspondence Project

Search: contains ""

400 Bad Request

Bad Request

Your browser sent a request that this server could not understand.


Apache/2.4.7 (Ubuntu) Server at cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk Port 443
Search:
in keywords
30 Items
Page:  1 2  Next

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 13 hits

  • … Bartlett, R. S. (1) Barwell, Richard (1) …
  • … Bishop, I. P. (1) Bishop, Richard (1) …
  • … Ford, R. S. (1) Fordman, Richard (1) …
  • … (2) Frean, Richard (2) Frere, G. E. …
  • … Hart, W. E. (1) Harte, Richard (1) …
  • … Hill, Lewin (2) Hill, Richard (b) (5) …
  • … College, London (1) Kippist, Richard (21) …
  • … Ogle, William (38) Okes, Richard (1) …
  • … Owen, G. S. (1) Owen, Richard (40) …
  • … Ramu, H. (4) Randolph, Richard (2) …
  • … Rich, Anthony (27) Richard, Henry (1) …
  • … Rice, Thomas (2) Spruce, Richard (5) …
  • … T. M. (2) Strachey, Richard (4) …

Controversy

Summary

The best-known controversies over Darwinian theory took place in public or in printed reviews. Many of these were highly polemical, presenting an over-simplified picture of the disputes. Letters, however, show that the responses to Darwin were extremely…

Matches: 6 hits

  • with Adam Sedgwick, professor of geology at Cambridge, and Richard Owen, the eminent comparative
  • respectful terms with his former professor. In the case of Owen, however, though their theoretical
  • explain so many classes of facts”. Darwin and Owen Letter 2526Owen, …
  • of geology, Charles Lyell at length a conversation with Owen concerning Origin . Darwin notes
  • Letter 2580Darwin, C. R. to Owen, Richard, 13 Dec [1859] Darwin responds to Owens remarks
  • with Harvard botanist Asa Gray. Darwin is annoyed at Owens malignity [ Edinburgh Rev. 111

Darwin in letters, 1847-1850: Microscopes and barnacles

Summary

Darwin's study of barnacles, begun in 1844, took him eight years to complete. The correspondence reveals how his interest in a species found during the Beagle voyage developed into an investigation of the comparative anatomy of other cirripedes and…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … Herschel, 4 February [1848] ). Letters between Darwin and Richard Owen, author of the zoological …
  • … of Cryptophialus minutus . He sent the manuscript to Richard Owen, presumably for his comments, …

Rewriting Origin - the later editions

Summary

For such an iconic work, the text of Origin was far from static. It was a living thing that Darwin continued to shape for the rest of his life, refining his ‘one long argument’ through a further five English editions.  Many of his changes were made in…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … and expanded his thinking. Stung by a reported comment from Richard Owen that 'we do not want …
  • … itself became a place for skirmishes over priority with Richard Owen .  In contrast to the …
  • … feet, and a sly dig at his old foe and former friend, Richard Owen (see the 'historical …

5935_4582

Summary

From J. D. Hooker   26[–7] February 1868KewFeby 26th/68Dear Darwin I have been bursting with impatience to hear what you would say of the Athenæum Review & who wrote it— I could not conceive who…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … not conceive who wrote it; & can still hardly believe that Owen could be so demoniacal; f1 …
  • … a critical review of Variation in the Athenæum to Richard Owen (see letter to J. D. Hooker, …
  • … † enc Could not believe Owen to be so demoniacal as to write the …
  • … Hooker, J. D. Hooker, J. D. Huxley, T. H. Owen, Richard Scientific negative …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 20 hits

  • literature, music, and the arts, the prominent anatomist Richard Owen denounced the account provided
  • writing, & that L. will find great difficulty in answering Owen  unaided ’ ( letter from J. D
  • to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1863] ). Falconer and Owen were already engaged in a dispute over
  • …  in January, Darwin, who was already ill-disposed towards Owen following his 1860 review of  Origin
  • and others found an additional reason to be annoyed with Owen when it became clear that Owens
  • of the Jurassic fossil. When informed by Falconer of Owensslip-shod and hasty accountof the
  • letter to Hugh Falconer, 20 [January 1863] ). Aside from Owens apparent oversights, Falconer
  • now famous fossil in his correspondence and publications; Owens perceived failings, however, …
  • … [1863] ). In March, after hearing from Lyell that Owen in his paper on the aye-aye claimed
  • disappointment that the paper gave him no scope to attack Owen even though hehad partly composed
  • did find an opportunity to enter his own protest against Owen with the appearance of an anonymous
  • 1863] , and Appendix VII). The reviewer, soon identified as Owen, accused Carpenter, a physician
  • Foraminifera probably derived from a few ancestral types. Owen also censured Darwin for subscribing
  • into which life was first breathed’ ( Origin , p. 484). Owen preferred Jean Baptiste de Lamarcks
  • matter.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [29 March 1863] ). Owens endorsement of Lamarck rankled all
  • of a scotched viper When Carpenters answer to Owens review was judged too weak a
  • wrote a letter to the  Athenæum  in opposition to Owens review, in which he sought to advance his
  • … [7 May 1863] , and Appendix VII). He also suspected that Owens reply had won favour with the
  • for the geologist Adam Sedgwick; Darwin suspected that Owen, a member of the council, had placed
  • of the first five months of the year, Darwin added: ‘Owen will not be right in telling Longmans that

Darwin and Design

Summary

At the beginning of the nineteenth century in Britain, religion and the sciences were generally thought to be in harmony. The study of God’s word in the Bible, and of his works in nature, were considered to be part of the same truth. One version of this…

Matches: 7 hits

  • can be found in the work of the comparative anatomist Richard Owen. In a series of publications in
  • birds, reptiles, and mammals). Thesearchetypes’, as Owen called them, were originally conceived in
  • connected these divisions into a single order of creation. Owen developed this theory of underlying
  • sum of a series of essentially similar segments. Owen went on to extend this theory of
  • thus showing the unity of plan of Gods creation. Owens highly theoretical anatomy was quite
  • purposes. In comparing the work of Paley, Buckland, and Owen, it becomes clear that natural theology
  • Hugh MillerFootprints of the creator  (1849). Richard OwenOn the archetype and

Darwin’s reading notebooks

Summary

In April 1838, Darwin began recording the titles of books he had read and the books he wished to read in Notebook C (Notebooks, pp. 319–28). In 1839, these lists were copied and continued in separate notebooks. The first of these reading notebooks (DAR 119…

Matches: 23 hits

  • … There appears to be good art. on Entozore 12  by Owen in Encyclop. of Anat. & Physiology [R. …
  • … researches on the Horse in N. America— [Harlan 1835] Owen has it. & Royal Soc Lord …
  • … geological History of the Horse [Karkeek 1841]. (not read.) Owen not got these No s . …
  • … read it— Erasmus has it Owens Brit. Mammalia [R. Owen 1846a]— Horner has it. (read) …
  • … Rich d . 2 d . poor. Henry IV [Shakespeare:  King Richard II ;  King Henry IV ] …
  • … July 5 th  Owens Lectures on Invertebrata [R. Owen 1843–6] Aug 1 Bradley’s Husbandry 3. …
  • … & G. Good Hope [Backhouse 1844] very poor Oct 1 Owen on Mylodon Robustus [R. Owen 1842]. …
  • … 1841] —— Owens Fossil British Mammalia [R. Owen 1846a] 27 th  Elie de Beaumont …
  • … of Lyell’s Elements 80  [Lyell 1847] —— Owen Lectures Fish [R. Owen 1846b]. 22 d …
  • … British Association for the Advancement of Science (1854). Richard Owen gave the same paper at the …
  • … is confused; the citation given is actually that of Richard Owen’s paper on Dinornis  rather than …
  • … all sorts of trees, shrubs, and flowers . Revised by Richard Bradley. London.  *119: 19v.; 119: …
  • … [Other eds.]  *119: 13, 22; 119: 22b Beste, John Richard. 1855.  The Wabash; or, …
  • … Home life in Germany . London.  128: 11 Bradley, Richard. 1724.  A general treatise of …
  • … [Abstract in DAR 205.3: 143–51.]  128: 6 Dana, Richard Henry. [1840].  Two years before …
  • … of glaciers.  Edinburgh.  119: 15b Ford, Richard. 1846.  Gatherings from Spain . By the …
  • … 119: 8a, 13a Hamilton, James. 1854.  A memoir of Richard Williams . Edinburgh.  128: 9 …
  • … in DAR 71: 87–8.]  *128: 173; 128: 12 Harlan, Richard. 1835.  Medical and physical …
  • … the recent discoveries.  London.  128: 3 Hinds, Richard Brinsley. 1843. The regions of …
  • … certain parts of the   animal œconomy … with notes by Richard Owen.  Vol. 4 of  The works of …
  • … from the Danish. London.  119: 14a Lane, Richard James. 1846.  Life at the water cure; or …
  • … Pamphlet Collection.]  *128: 179 Lepsius, Karl Richard. 1842.  Auswahl der wichtigsten   …
  • … 1825.  Memoirs of the life of the Right   Honourable Richard Brinsley Sheridan.  London.  119: …

Scientific Practice

Summary

Specialism|Experiment|Microscopes|Collecting|Theory Letter writing is often seen as a part of scientific communication, rather than as integral to knowledge making. This section shows how correspondence could help to shape the practice of science, from…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … in London. Letter 1166 — Darwin, C. R. to Owen, Richard, [26 Mar 1848] Darwin …

Darwin in letters, 1860: Answering critics

Summary

On 7 January 1860, John Murray published the second edition of Darwin’s Origin of species, printing off another 3000 copies to satisfy the demands of an audience that surprised both the publisher and the author. It wasn't long, however, before ‘the…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … a series of attacks, the most vicious of which came from Richard Owen in the April issue of the  …

Darwin’s study of the Cirripedia

Summary

Darwin’s work on barnacles, conducted between 1846 and 1854, has long posed problems for historians. Coming between his transmutation notebooks and the Origin of species, it has frequently been interpreted as a digression from Darwin’s species work. Yet…

Matches: 10 hits

  • 1981). Many of Darwins contemporariesEdward Forbes, Richard Owen, Louis Agassiz, William Sharp
  • Ospovat 1981, p. 108). Darwins frequent discussions with Owen no doubt helped to sharpen his
  • philosophical anatomy of Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, Owen was at this time formulating new
  • work of naturalists such as Robert Brown, Martin Barry, and Owen in England and Henri Milne-Edwards
  • 1852) or elevating it to a separate class altogether (R. Owen 1855). Milne-Edwards and Owen also
  • them as a separate order within this sub-class of Crustacea. Owen, on the other hand, recognised the
  • locomotion and the presence of separate sexes, according to Owens classificatory principles the
  • a distinct class between the Crustacea and the Annelida (R. Owen 1855).^7^ Darwin, however, with his
  • suited his purposes well; he reported in a letter to Richard Owen, 26 March 1848 , that he
  • …    ^7^ No doubt Huxley was pointedly referring to Owen when he stated in a lecture of 1857

Darwin in letters, 1861: Gaining allies

Summary

The year 1861 marked an important change in the direction of Darwin’s work. He had weathered the storm that followed the publication of Origin, and felt cautiously optimistic about the ultimate acceptance of his ideas. The letters from this year provide an…

Matches: 10 hits

  • and of special creation. Supported by such authorities as Richard Owen and Louis Agassiz who
  • however, was mild in comparison with the controversy between Richard Owen and Thomas Henry Huxley
  • relationship between the human species and the higher apes. Owen had given anatomical lectures to
  • brought back from West Africa by Paul Belloni Du Chaillu. Owen, while pointing out the similarities
  • dissimilar. Huxley pointed out, publicly and acerbicly that Owen was mistaken in his interpretations
  • For his part, Darwin enjoyed Huxleys sparring with Owen, though periodically concerned at the
  • attacks. On reading an article by Huxley that criticised Owens views on the brain, Darwin
  • … ( letter to T. H. Huxley, 3 January [1861] ). Ever since Owens highly critical and, Darwin felt, …
  • the year, he did not wish foropen quarrel’, but he and Owen wouldnever be friends again’ ( …
  • had defended Darwin against criticism from Adam Sedgwick and Richard Owen. Darwin himself was able

Thomas Henry Huxley

Summary

Dubbed “Darwin’s bulldog” for his combative role in controversies over evolution, Huxley was a leading Victorian zoologist, science popularizer, and education reformer. He was born in Ealing, a small village west of London, in 1825. With only two years of…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … criticism of eminent authorities, such as George Cuvier, Richard Owen, and Louis Agassiz (see …

Darwin in letters, 1844–1846: Building a scientific network

Summary

The scientific results of the Beagle voyage still dominated Darwin's working life, but he broadened his continuing investigations into the nature and origin of species. Far from being a recluse, Darwin was at the heart of British scientific society,…

Matches: 3 hits

  • Henslow, Leonard Horner, Leonard Jenyns, Edward Forbes, and Richard Owen shows. These friends, with
  • on species mutability with Hooker, Horner, Jenyns, Lyell, Owen, and Charles James Fox Bunbury; he
  • Edward Forbes, William Lonsdale, Hugh Edwin Strickland, or Owenthe last with the caveat that he

The whale-bear

Summary

Darwin came to regard ‘bear’ as a ‘word of ill-omen’.  In the first edition of Origin he told the story of a black bear seen swimming for hours with its mouth wide open scooping insects from the water ‘like a whale’. He went on to imagine that natural…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … This half-way house may have been intended to appease Richard Owen who, to Darwin’s exasperation, …

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 2 hits

  • of thinking about the significance of John Goulds and Richard Owens identifications of his bird
  • … . The work comprises five partsFossil Mammalia , by Richard OwenMammalia , by G. R. …

Darwin and barnacles

Summary

In a letter to Henslow in March 1835 Darwin remarked that he had done ‘very little’ in zoology; the ‘only two novelties’ he added, almost as an afterthought, were a new mollusc and a ‘genus in the family Balanidæ’ – a barnacle – but it was an oddity. Who,…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … known to him. But by the end of November he had asked Richard Owen for further specimens of …

Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 3 hits

  • of Science at the beginning of October. He missed Richard Owen, one of hischief enemies’ ( letter
  • aye-aye. However, Huxley described the event, detailing how Owen was seen in the ensuing discussion
  • with palaeontological matters. In the new second edition of Owens  Palaeontology , which Huxley

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 2 hits

  • … disintegration of his relationship with the palaeontologist Richard Owen: ‘your several articles’, …
  • … as that on the origins of music provided by her husband, Richard Buckley Litchfield ( letter to H. …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … to respond to his former friend, and now bitter antagonist, Richard Owen, whose harsh criticism of  …
Page:  1 2  Next
letter