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Darwin in letters, 1862: A multiplicity of experiments

Summary

1862 was a particularly productive year for Darwin. This was not only the case in his published output (two botanical papers and a book on the pollination mechanisms of orchids), but more particularly in the extent and breadth of the botanical experiments…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … and assistance with experiments. In January, he wrote to Asa Gray thanking him for some ‘new cases …
  • … had ‘different functions’. He continued to write to Gray throughout the year about his quest for …
  • … son, William, his language was more blunt ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 14 February [1862] ): ‘whether …
  • … French Translation will appear very soon’ ( letter to C. E. Brown-Séquard, 2 January [1862] ). …
  • … Bronn died suddenly from a heart attack ( see letter from E. Schweizerbart’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung …
  • … and Emma ‘perplexed to death what to do’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, [2–3 August 1862] ). They …
  • … work would make his life ‘much happier’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 14 February [1862] ). Darwin …
  • … with him, enthusiastically set to work ( see letter to W. E. Darwin, [2–3 August 1862] , and …

Darwin in letters, 1863: Quarrels at home, honours abroad

Summary

At the start of 1863, Charles Darwin was actively working on the manuscript of The variation of animals and plants under domestication, anticipating with excitement the construction of a hothouse to accommodate his increasingly varied botanical experiments…

Matches: 24 hits

  • … ‘some Quadrumanum animal’, as he put it in a letter to J. D. Hooker of 24[–5] February [1863] . …
  • wished his one-time mentor had not said a word ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24[–5] February [1863] ). …
  • from Charles Lyell, 11 March 1863 ). The botanist Asa Gray, Darwins friend in the United States, …
  • Huxleys book would scare them off ( see letter from Asa Gray, 20 April 1863 ). In May, Darwin
  • difficulty in answering Owen  unaided ’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [23 February 1863] ). Hugh
  • of Lyells book being written by others’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [23 February 1863] ). …
  • to see men fighting so for a little fame’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1863] ). …
  • seen how indignant all Owens lies and mean conduct about E. Columbi made me… . The case is come to
  • to capture his and othersattention ( see letter to J. D. Dana, 20 February [1863] , and letter
  • a letter to the  Athenæum  in response ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 March [1863] ). He later
  • partly composed such  a good letter (!)’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 17 March [1863] ). At the
  • Benjamin Carpenters book on Foraminifera ( see letter to J. D. Hooker, [29 March 1863] , and
  • might as well think of origin of matter.—’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [29 March 1863] ). Owens
  • the first edition of  Antiquity of man  ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [23 February 1863] , and
  • amended verdict on the Origin’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 20 April [1863] ). Darwin quoted a sentence
  • science before the public in this way ( see letter from J. D. Hooker, [7 May 1863] , and Appendix
  • have been gnashing my teeth at my own folly’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [9 May 1863] ). After his
  • bending his facts to support Darwins theory ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [17 April 1863] ). …
  • … (see  Correspondence  vol. 10). He sent a copy to Asa Gray to review in an American journal, and
  • … [1863] and 31 January [1863] , and letter to Asa Gray, 31 May [1863] ). Asa Gray reviewed
  • Copley Medal had been unsuccessful ( see letter from E. A. Darwin to Emma Darwin, 11 November [1863
  • over the angles of leaves, asking the professional botanists Gray, Hooker, and Daniel Oliver for
  • from Daniel Oliver, 17 February 1863 , letter to Asa Gray, 20 April [1863] , letter to J. D. …
  • the bookcase and around the head of the sofa ( letter to W. E. Darwin, [25 July 1863], and

Religion

Summary

Design|Personal Belief|Beauty|The Church Perhaps the most notorious realm of controversy over evolution in Darwin's day was religion. The same can be said of the evolution controversy today; however the nature of the disputes and the manner in…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … for the attention now given to the subject. He poses Gray a question on design in nature, as he is …
  • … white flag than to fire my usual long-range shot”. He asks Gray some questions about design. …
  • … gives an “excellent idea of Pangenesis”. He talks about Gray giving him a good slap at his …
  • … He can give me.” Letter 5303 — Boole, M. E. to Darwin, C. R., 13 Dec 1866 In this …
  • … Letter 5307 — Darwin, C. R. to Boole, M. E., 14 Dec 1866 Darwin believes he is unable to …
  • … Letter 8070 — Darwin, C. R. to Abbot, F. E., 16 Nov [1871] Darwin explains why he must …
  • … Letter 12757 — Darwin, C. R. to Aveling, E. B., 13 Oct 1880 In this letter marked “private”, …
  • … regarding the Church. Letter 297 — Darwin, S. E. to Darwin, C. R., 12 Feb 1836 …
  • … Darwin, Sir John Lubbock, Ellen Frances Lubbock, and S. E. Wedgwood, petition the Board to grant …

Scientific Networks

Summary

Friendship|Mentors|Class|Gender In its broadest sense, a scientific network is a set of connections between people, places, and things that channel the communication of knowledge, and that substantially determine both its intellectual form and content,…

Matches: 18 hits

  • the networks of others, such as Joseph Dalton Hooker and Asa Gray, who were at leading scientific
  • contact. His correspondence with Joseph Hooker and Asa Gray illustrates how close personal ties
  • The first is between Darwin and his friend Kew botanist J. D. Hooker. The second is between Darwin
  • Letter 736Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 23 Feb [1844] Darwin begins with a charming
  • species to wide-ranging genera. Darwin and Gray Letter 1674Darwin, C. R. …
  • in the USA. Letter 2125Darwin, C. R. to Gray, Asa, 20 July [1857] Darwin writes
  • Letter 1202Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 6 Oct [1848] Darwin catches up on personal
  • name to specific name. Letter 1220Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 3 Feb 1849 In
  • Letter 1260Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 12 Oct 1849 Darwin opens by discussing their
  • lamination of gneiss. Letter 1319Hooker, J. D. to Darwin, C. R., 6 & 7 Apr 1850
  • Letter 1339Darwin, C. R. to Hooker, J. D., 13 June [1850] Darwin writes to Hooker from his
  • Letter 152Darwin, C. R. to Henslow, J. S., 3 Dec [1831] Darwin expresses confusion on
  • duty to lecture me”. Letter 196Henslow, J. S. to Darwin, C. R., 15 & 21 Jan
  • … . Letter 4260aDarwin, C. R. to Becker, L. E., 2 Aug [1863] Darwin thanks Lydia
  • Letter 115Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, S. E., [4 Sept 1831] Darwin writes to his sister Susan. …
  • Letter 7124Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, H. E., [8 February 1870] Darwin writes to his
  • Letter 5585Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, H. E., 26 July [1867] Darwin writes to his daughter
  • and corrections. Letter 5745Barber, M. E. to Darwin, C. R., [after Feb 1867] In

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 10 hits

  • … you suffer largely in the same way’, Darwin wrote to Gray on 28 January . On 14 November, Hooker …
  • … we have & you are one of the best of all’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 11 September [1876] ). …
  • … she confided to Henrietta (letter from Emma Darwin to H. E. Litchfield, [31 August 1876] (DAR 219.9: …
  • … herself & is so tender’ (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [13 September 1876] (DAR 210.6 …
  • … completed autobiography (letter from Emma Darwin to W. E. Darwin, [13 September 1876] (DAR 210.6: …
  • … horrid bad style into intelligible English’, he told Asa Gray on 28 October . Please …
  • … are not readable, & the 6 last very dull’, he warned Asa Gray on 28 October , when sending …
  • … lively reading for one so poor at figures as I am’, Gray conceded on 12 November , although he …
  • … horticulturists and agriculturists in France ( letter from E. M. Heckel, 27 December 1876 ). In …
  • … compare size of pollen grains & state of stigma’, he told Gray on 4 December. Darwin also …

Darwin in letters, 1861: Gaining allies

Summary

The year 1861 marked an important change in the direction of Darwin’s work. He had weathered the storm that followed the publication of Origin, and felt cautiously optimistic about the ultimate acceptance of his ideas. The letters from this year provide an…

Matches: 14 hits

  • natural theology. He made arrangements with his friend Asa Gray to reprint and distribute in Britain
  • … & Natural Selection, right good service’ ( letter to Asa Gray, 267 Februrary [1861] ). Darwin
  • III). However, Darwin himself remained unconvinced by Grays suggestion that providence may have
  • could not bedirectly proved’ ( see second letter to J. D. Hooker, 23 [April 1861] ). Darwin
  • believe a better man never walked this earth’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 18 [May 1861] ). Henslow
  • intercrossing between distinct individuals. He told Gray that such cases could perhapsthrow some
  • am not doing a foolish action in publishing’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 17 November [1861] ). …
  • would sobe at once an almost rich man’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, [26 May 1861] ). The
  • was thought to bea form of typhus fever’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 11 May 1860 ). This hope was
  • respectable persons on your own account’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 17 [October 1861] ). He also
  • he therefore resigned his commission (see letters to W. E. Darwin, 22 October [1861] , 27
  • interesting’, Darwin told the Harvard botanist Asa Gray on 5 June, and added, despite the British
  • or heard a soul who is not with the North’. Darwin and Gray both unreservedly supported the northern
  • views and sentiments are perfectly satisfactory to me’, Gray wrote to Darwin on 31 December. …

Natural Selection: the trouble with terminology Part I

Summary

Darwin encountered problems with the term ‘natural selection’ even before Origin appeared.  Everyone from the Harvard botanist Asa Gray to his own publisher came up with objections. Broadly these divided into concerns either that its meaning simply wasn’t…

Matches: 7 hits

  • Origin appearedEveryone from the Harvard botanist Asa Gray to his own publisher came up with
  • of his theory written in 1842 , and, as he told Asa Gray in September 1857 , he intended to call
  • years, Natural Selection . With that letter to Gray, Darwin enclosed a brilliantly
  • for the good of each organic being’. It was Grays now missing response to that exposition
  • … ” ’. It was the draft of this enclosure to Gray , along with extracts from Darwins
  • under domestication & nature ’, other readers reinforced Grays original criticism that
  • applicable to them! —a reference to John Edward Gray, who Darwin exclaimed understood

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … Abberley, John (1) Abbot, F. E. (17) …
  • … Alice (2) Alison, R. E. (2) Allen, …
  • … Vienna (1) Appleton, C. E. C. B. (2) …
  • … Austin, C. F. (1) Aveling, E. B. (7) …
  • … Bacon, Booth (1) Badger, E. W. (3) …
  • … Baranoff, W. (2) Barber, M. E. (1) …
  • … Frédéric (1) Baumhauer, E. H. von (2) …
  • … T. B. (1) Bearpark, G. E. (1) …
  • … Beck, John (2) Becker, L. E. (16) …
  • … Joseph (2) Bessey, C. E. (1) …
  • … Graves, A. E. (2) Gray, A. F. (2) …

Darwin in letters, 1869: Forward on all fronts

Summary

At the start of 1869, Darwin was hard at work making changes and additions for a fifth edition of  Origin. He may have resented the interruption to his work on sexual selection and human evolution, but he spent forty-six days on the task. Much of the…

Matches: 4 hits

  • … what is a “Morphological character” … all characters i.e. all departures from a given structure are …
  • … understood … I always thought individual differences [i.e., differences between individuals] more …
  • … peoples in India and Africa. The American botanist Asa Gray and his wife, Jane Loring Gray , who …
  • … & contempt—almost hatred—’ ( from Asa Gray and J. L. Gray, 8 and 9 May [1869] ). James …

New material added to the American edition of Origin

Summary

A ‘revised and augmented’ American edition of Origin came on the market in July 1860, and was the only authorised edition available in the US until 1873. It incorporated many of the changes Darwin made to the second English edition, but still contained…

Matches: 17 hits

  • Origin was published, Darwin received a letter from Asa Gray offering to arrange an American
  • a share in possible profits. Darwin responded favourably to Grays proposal in his letter of 21
  • their heads that a species is an entity.—‘ After Gray had contacted the Boston publishing
  • preparing for distribution. Acting on Darwins behalf, Gray duly contacted D. Appleton to inquire
  • transmitting their response to Darwin (see letters from Asa Gray, [10 January 1860], [17 January
  • through the process of stereotyping (see letter from Asa Gray, 23 January [1860] and n. 2). The firm
  • of the transmutation of species; Darwin sent this off to Gray enclosed in his letter of [8 or 9
  • to Lyell, 18 [and 19 February 1860]. Darwin suggested to Gray that the title page of the new edition
  • Second Edition with additional corrections” (letter to Asa Gray, 1 February [1860]). By 1 May
  • three separate printings of Origin (see letter to Asa Gray, 22 May [1860] and enclosure) and
  • edition of Origin was available in July 1860 (see [Gray] 1860b, p. 116). It is interesting to
  • … , published in March 1861 (see Freeman 1977, p. 83). As Grays biographer A. Hunter Dupree has noted
  • prejudices. In 1846, the veteran geologist, M. J. dOmalius dHalloz, published in an
  • animaux sauvages démontre déjà la variabilité limitée des espèces. Les expériences sur les
  • of finality, ‘‘puissance mystérieuse, indéterminée; fatalité pour les uns; pour les autres, volonté …
  • de lexistence du monde, la forme, le volume et la durée de chacun deux, en raison de sa destinée
  • the world. Hooker has recently shown that in the S. E. corner of Australia, where apparently there

Darwin in letters, 1867: A civilised dispute

Summary

Charles Darwin’s major achievement in 1867 was the completion of his large work, The variation of animals and plants under domestication (Variation). The importance of Darwin’s network of correspondents becomes vividly apparent in his work on expression in…

Matches: 11 hits

  • his newly completed book: a paragraph throwing doubt on Asa Grays doctrine that each variation had
  • at what rate your work will be published’ ( letter from J. V. Carus, 5 April 1867 ). This hint of
  • to introduce the work to the German public ( letter from J. V. Carus, 15 April 1867 ). Darwin may
  • translate my book in preference to you’ ( letter to J. V. Carus, 18 April [1867] ). Darwin was not
  • Trail, 5 April 1867 ). Darwin told his American friend Asa Gray, ‘I am repeating this experiment on
  • attack it & me with unparalleled ferocity’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 17 November [1867] ). …
  • queries to acquaintances in remote areas. On 26 March, Asa Gray wrote, ‘You see I have  printed
  • had read it and whether it was worth reading ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 4 February 1867 ). In a
  • her, & as it seems very unjustly’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 27 [March 1867] ). Unfortunately, …
  • judgement he would subdue; that is yours’ ( letter from J. V. Carus, 5 April 1867 ). Darwin
  • are excellent, excellent, excellent’ ( letter to H. E. Darwin, 26 July [1867] ). The year ended as

Women’s scientific participation

Summary

Observers | Fieldwork | Experimentation | Editors and critics | Assistants Darwin’s correspondence helps bring to light a community of women who participated, often actively and routinely, in the nineteenth-century scientific community. Here is a…

Matches: 11 hits

  • … in inheritance. Letter 3787 - Darwin, H. E. to Darwin, [29 October 1862] …
  • … behaviour. Letter 4258 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [31 July 1863] Lydia …
  • … officinalis . Letter 5745 - Barber, M. E. to Darwin, [after February 1867] …
  • … 6535 - Vaughan Williams , M. S. to Darwin, H. E., [after 14 October 1869] Darwin’s …
  • … of wormholes. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November1872] …
  • … her niece’s ears. Letter 8701 - Lubbock, E. F . to Darwin, [1873] Ellen …
  • … insects. Men: Letter 2221 - Blyth, E. to Darwin, [22 February 1858] …
  • … New Zealand. Letter 6453 - Langton, E. to Wedgwood, S. E., [9 November 1868] …
  • … on the wallpaper. Letter 5756 - Langton, E. & C. to Wedgwood S. E., [after 9 …
  • … Letter 4823  - Wedgwood, L. C. to Darwin, H. E., [May 1865] Darwin’s niece, Lucy, …
  • … Men: Letter 385  - Wedgwood, S. E. & J. to Darwin, [10 November 1837] …

Darwin in letters, 1856-1857: the 'Big Book'

Summary

In May 1856, Darwin began writing up his 'species sketch’ in earnest. During this period, his working life was completely dominated by the preparation of his 'Big Book', which was to be called Natural selection. Using letters are the main…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … in 1856 by Hooker’s friend the American botanist Asa Gray and then by the specialist in Madeiran …
  • … tend to show a separation of the sexes, a proposal that Asa Gray and Hooker confirmed during the …
  • … bad & not a stop from beginning to end!’ (letters to W. E. Darwin, [17 February 1857] and …

Darwin in letters, 1868: Studying sex

Summary

The quantity of Darwin’s correspondence increased dramatically in 1868 due largely to his ever-widening research on human evolution and sexual selection.Darwin’s theory of sexual selection as applied to human descent led him to investigate aspects of the…

Matches: 22 hits

  • to read a few pages feel fairly nauseated’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 February [1868] ). But such
  • of me. I feel convinced it is by Owen’. John Edward Gray, a colleague of Richard Owens in the
  • a scamp & I begin to think a veritable ass’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868] ). …
  • information on colour changes in the canary (letters from J. J. Weir, [26] March 1868 and 3
  • added, ‘for it is clear that I have none’ ( letter to J. J. Weir, 30 May [1868] ). Sexual
  • role of colour, sound, and smell in attracting females. J. J. Weir reported on 14 April 1868
  • of Hookers distributed it in Japan ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 5 September 1868 ); Edward Wilson, …
  • and had himself watched elephants cry (letters to W. E. Darwin, [15 March 1868] and 8 April
  • in patients undergoing vaccination ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [7 April 1868] ). Francis was also
  • and the action of his platysma muscle ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [15 April 1868] ). The flow of
  • the previous year by James Philip Mansel Weale ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [20 May 1868] ). …
  • through adaptation to local conditions ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [23 December 1868] ). Barbers
  • the theology favoured by some of his supporters, notably Asa Gray, seemed to render natural
  • lines by God. Of Darwins discussion in  Variation , Gray wrote on 25 May : ‘I found your … …
  • perfectly, & feel the weight of it.’ Some thought Grays position still a strong one. An
  • adeep-seated enmity to Revealed Religion’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 1 September [1868], n. 11 ). …
  • induced him to stay away ( letter from S. J. OH. Horsman, 2 June [1868] ). But if Horsman
  • to have walked with village girls at night ( letter to J. B. Innes, 10 December [1868] ). ‘The
  • of the whole neighbourhood’, Darwin warned ( letter to J. B. Innes, 1 December 1868 ). Innes tried
  • friend out of a most distressing dilemma’ ( letter from J. B. Innes, 14 December 1868 ). A
  • distinction of the kindworth a fig’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 16 June 1868 ). Requests for
  • the outing had done nothing for his health ( letter to Asa Gray, 15 August [1868] ), but it did

Darwin in letters, 1858-1859: Origin

Summary

The years 1858 and 1859 were, without doubt, the most momentous of Darwin’s life. From a quiet rural existence filled with steady work on his ‘big book’ on species, he was jolted into action by the arrival of an unexpected letter from Alfred Russel Wallace…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … for on this view wherever many closely related species, (i.e. species of the same genus) have been …
  • … new to the experts. Darwin was delighted to hear from Asa Gray that he was not aware of such a …
  • … his theory, along with an abstract of his views sent to Asa Gray in September 1857. The …
  • … points in Darwin’s work with which they disagreed. Both Gray and Huxley, who were to become Darwin’s …
  • … to note that in the list of corrections Darwin sent to Asa Gray for a possible American edition, the …
  • … much more larky since we run two horses’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 6 October [1858] ). Visitors to …

Darwin in letters, 1874: A turbulent year

Summary

The year 1874 was one of consolidation, reflection, and turmoil for Darwin. He spent the early months working on second editions of Coral reefs and Descent of man; the rest of the year was mostly devoted to further research on insectivorous plants. A…

Matches: 9 hits

  • … Erasmus’s house. The event was led by the medium Charles E. Williams, and was attended by George …
  • … all the horrid bother of correction’ ( letter to H. E. Litchfield, 21 [March 1874] ). The book …
  • … artificial gastric juice  for about a week ( letter from E. E. Klein, 14 May 1874 ). John Burdon …
  • … the man-eating tree of Madagascar Asa Gray publicised Darwin’s work on insectivorous …
  • … F. S. B. François de Chaumont, 29 April 1874 ). Asa Gray forwarded a letter from the …
  • … try to get it exhibited at a Royal Society of London soirée  (see letter from Anton Dohrn, 6 April …
  • … nephew, the fine-art specialist Henry Parker ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 17 [March 1874] ). He …
  • … Julius Victor Carus, and his publisher, Eduard Koch of E. Schweizerbart’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, …
  • … could not weary the German public ( letter to H. E. Litchfield,  21 [March 1874] ). …

Darwin in letters, 1872: Job done?

Summary

'My career’, Darwin wrote towards the end of 1872, 'is so nearly closed. . .  What little more I can do, shall be chiefly new work’, and the tenor of his correspondence throughout the year is one of wistful reminiscence, coupled with a keen eye…

Matches: 19 hits

  • as I can make it’, he wrote to the translator ( letter to JJMoulinié, 23 September 1872 ). He
  • anatomist St George Jackson Mivart ( letter to St GJMivart,  11 January [1872] ). A
  • am made to appear’, complained Darwin ( letter to St GJMivart, 5 January 1872 ). Piqued, …
  • … `fundamental intellectual errors’ ( letter from St GJMivart, 6 January 1872 ). Darwin
  • to think he felt friendly towards me’ ( letter to St GJMivart, 8 January [1872] ).  Despite
  • if only `in another world’ ( letter from St GJMivart,  10 January 1872 ).  Darwin, determined
  • …  but asked Mivart not to acknowledge it ( letter to St GJMivart, 11 January [1872] ). 'I
  • selection is somewhat under a cloud’, he wrote to JETaylor on 13 January , and he complained
  • rather than offended by `that clever book’ ( letter to JMHerbert, 21 November 1872 ) and
  • by her husband, Richard Buckley Litchfield ( letter to HELitchfield, 13 May 1872 ). Delivery
  • … 'I know that I am half-killed myself’ ( letter to HELitchfield, 25 July 1872 ). A
  • was Darwins wholeheartedly partisan reply ( letter to JDHooker, 14 May 1872 ). On 13 June, a
  • a week later ( enclosure to letter from John Lubbock to WEGladstone, 20 June 1872 ).  Darwin
  • to make one turn into an old honest Tory’ ( letter to JDHooker, 12 July [1872] ). …
  • own muscles when attending women in labour ( letter from JTRothrock, 25 November 1872 ); …
  • subject which formerly interested me,’ Darwin wrote to Asa Gray at the beginning of the year; &#039
  • have worked out and published about Drosera & Dionæa’, Gray had replied on hearing of the
  • than usual. One such old friend was Sarah Haliburton, née Owen, to whose sister, Fanny, Darwin had
  • my life which surprised & gratified me more’ ( letter to JMHerbert, 21 November 1872 ).  …

Darwin's bad days

Summary

Despite being a prolific worker who had many successes with his scientific theorising and experimenting, even Darwin had some bad days. These times when nothing appeared to be going right are well illustrated by the following quotations from his letters:

Matches: 1 hits

  • … Despite being a prolific worker who had many successes with his scientific theorising and …

Darwin in letters, 1877: Flowers and honours

Summary

Ever since the publication of Expression, Darwin’s research had centred firmly on botany. The year 1877 was no exception. The spring and early summer were spent completing Forms of flowers, his fifth book on a botanical topic. He then turned to the…

Matches: 6 hits

  • … anything about dried flowers’, Darwin complained to Asa Gray on 8 March , ‘I never look at one …
  • … of Kosmos covering the German debate (letters to W. E. Gladstone, 2 October 1877 and 25 …
  • … form and of motion was exact and lively’ ( letter from W. E. Gladstone, 23 October 1877 ). …
  • … found him as soft & smooth as butter’ ( letter to C. E. Norton, 16 March 1877 ). Hooker was …
  • … the gospel of dirt the order of the day’ ( letter from E. A. Darwin, 27 January [1877] ).  Carlyle …
  • … study of medical monstrosity ( letter from C. T. E. Siebold, 10 October 1877 ). An American banker …

Darwin in letters,1866: Survival of the fittest

Summary

The year 1866 began well for Charles Darwin, as his health, after several years of illness, was now considerably improved. In February, Darwin received a request from his publisher, John Murray, for a new edition of  Origin. Darwin got the fourth…

Matches: 28 hits

  • foolish, Penurious, Pragmatical Prigs’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [29 December 1866] ). But the
  • the basis of alleged evidence of a global ice age, while Asa Gray pressed Darwins American
  • soliciting assistance from the American botanist Asa Gray, the nurseryman Thomas Rivers, and the
  • Animals & Cult. Plantsto Printers’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 24 December [1866] ). When
  • more than the belief of a dozen physicists’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 February 1866] ). Darwin
  • … ‘Your fatherentered at the same time with Dr B. J. who received him with triumph. All his friends
  • after the startling apparition of your face at R.S. Soirèewhich I dreamed of 2 nights running. …
  • me to worship Bence Jones in future—’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 13 May 1866 ). Darwin himself
  • then went for ¾ to Zoolog. Garden!!!!!!!!!’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [28 April 1866] ). …
  • on those terms so you are in for it’ ( letter from H. E. Darwin, [  c . 10 May 1866] ). …
  • much to see him, though I dread all exertion’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, [12 May 1866] ). Darwins
  • Georg Bronn, had been published in 1860 and 1863 by the firm E. Schweizerbartsche
  • across the Atlantic, despite much effort expended by Asa Gray in trying to secure a new American
  • changes, but their proposal was unsatisfactory to Darwin. Gray then approached another American firm
  • interested in  Rhamnus  (buckthorn) in 1861, when Asa Gray informed him that a North American
  • wasmerely ordinaryly diœcious’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, [7 May11 June 1866] ). On
  • a case of dimorphic becoming diœcious’ ( letter from W. E. Darwin, 20 June [1866] ). Darwin
  • I am well accustomed to such explosions’ ( letter to W. E. Darwin, 22 June [1866] ). He urged
  • … & admit how little is known on the subject’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 3 and 4 August [1866] ). …
  • see how differently we look at every thing’ ( letter to J. D. Hooker, 5 August [1866] ). Yet both
  • same thing in a different light from you’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, 7 August 1866 ). The two
  • on 18 August, bringing hisblessed mss’ ( letter from J. D. Hooker, [17 August 1866] ). Hooker
  • Samuel Wilberforce, had held forth against  Origin  (J. D. Hooker 1866a, pp. 50, 756). The
  • a subject of long discussion in previous years with Lyell, Gray, and Hooker. Wallaces
  • a subject of extensive correspondence between Darwin and Asa Gray for many years, was legally
  • indeed at poor Susans loneliness’ ( letter from E. C. Langton to Emma and Charles Darwin, [6 and 7
  • apersonal and Infinitely good Being’ (letter from M. E. Boole, 13 December 1866 ). Darwin
  • than from the direct intervention of God’ ( letter to M. E. Boole, 14 December 1866 ). But
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