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Caroline Kennard

Summary

Kennard’s interest in science stemmed from her social commitments to the women's movement, her interests in nature study as a tool for educational reform, as well as her place in a tightly knit network of the Bostonian elite. Kennard was one of a…

Matches: 5 hits

  • Caroline Augusta Kennard (née Smith) was born in 1827 in New Hampshire. In …
  • … Along with prominent Bostonians like Julia Ward Howe, Caroline M. Severance, Edna D. Cheney, Lucy …
  • … correspondence with the British gentleman-naturalist Charles Darwin. On 26 December 1881, Caroline
  • … but inferior intellectual qualities when compared to men. Darwin noted that given the observations …
  • … to establish a scholarship in memory of her sister. The Caroline A. Kennard Scholarship in Science …

Florence Caroline Dixie

Summary

On October 29th 1880, Lady Florence Dixie wrote a letter to Charles Darwin from her home in the Scottish Borders; “Whilst reading the other day your very interesting account of A Naturalist’s Voyage round the world,” she said, “I came across a passage…of…

Matches: 1 hits

  • … 1880, Lady Florence Dixie wrote a letter to Charles Darwin from her home in the Scottish Borders …

Edward Lumb

Summary

Edward Lumb was born in Yorkshire. According to the memoirs of his daughter Anne, Lady Macdonell, he travelled to Buenos Aires aged sixteen with his merchant uncle, Charles Poynton, and after some fortunate enterprises set up in business there. In 1833…

Matches: 6 hits

  • there. In 1833 while voyaging on the Beagle Charles Darwin stayed with Edward Lumb, and he
  • contacts enabled him to dispatch fossils back to Britain for Darwin: he arranged for megatherium
  • estates in Argentina and Uruguay. Edward Lumb gave Darwin a letter of introduction to them , and
  • the 22 nd to the 26 th November 1833. In March 1834 Darwin wrote from the Falkland Islands
  • and in May Lumb sent a case of specimens to Cambridge . Darwin and Lumb maintained their
  • 1872 Alfred Tylor, who also lived in Carshalton, wrote to Darwin and included the news that Mr

Early Days

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment The young Charles Darwin From an early age, Darwin exhibited a keen interest in the natural world. His boyish fascination with naturalist pursuits deepened as he entered college and started to interact with…

Matches: 8 hits

  • … started to interact with fellow natural history enthusiasts. Darwin's correspondence from this …
  • … Under the mentorship of Robert Grant at Edinburgh, Darwin undertook original research about the …
  • … of bryazoan. In correspondence from his student days, Darwin negotiates complicated relationships …
  • … SOURCES Books Browne, Janet. Darwin's Origin of Species: A Biography. (2008 …
  • … so pleasant receiving letters.” Letter 68 —Darwin to William Darwin Fox [15 July 1829] …
  • … must take to complete his degree. Letter 78 —Darwin to William Darwin Fox [25 Mar 1830] …
  • … visit beetling in Cambridgeshire. Letter 98 —Darwin to Caroline Darwin [28 Apr 1831] …
  • … time spent at university? What do his letters to his sister Caroline reveal about their relationship …

Dining at Down House

Summary

Sources|Discussion Questions|Experiment Dining, Digestion, and Darwin's Domestic Life While Darwin is best remembered for his scientific accomplishments, he greatly valued and was strongly influenced by his domestic life. Darwin's…

Matches: 13 hits

  • Questions | Experiment Dining, Digestion, and Darwin's Domestic Life
  • chance for what share of happiness this world affords." ( Darwin to H.W. Bates , 26
  • and they partook in his scientific endeavours. One of Darwin's defining characteristics
  • through his correspondence. Letters written to and from Darwin, as well as those exchanged between
  • provides into the bright and engaging personalities of the Darwin children and of family life in the
  • SOURCES Book Darwin, Charles. On the Origin of Species . 1859. London: John
  • Dining at Down House Letter 259Charles Darwin to Caroline Darwin, 13 October
  • South American cities, cultures, geography, flora and fauna) Darwin complains to his sister Caroline
  • while ill. Letter 465Emma Wedgwood (Emma Darwin) to Charles Darwin, [30 December 1838] …
  • agreeablefor her sake. Letter 3626Emma Darwin to T. G. Appleton, 28 June [1862] …
  • behalf to his American publisher, T. G. Appleton. Darwin, who is too ill to write himself, wishes to
  • cod liver oil and moderate work, among other things, for Darwins complaints. Emma Darwin
  • suffers a bout ofrocking & giddiness”. Emma Darwin to Henrietta Darwin, [5 September

Henrietta Darwin's diary

Summary

Darwin's daughter Henrietta kept a diary for a few momentous weeks in 1871. This was the year in which Descent of Man, the most controversial of her father's books after Origin itself, appeared, a book which she had helped him write. The small…

Matches: 10 hits

  • Charles Darwins daughter Henrietta wrote the following journal entries in March and
  • 1871 in a small lockable, leather-bound notebook now in the Darwin Archive of Cambridge University
  • excised within it, presumably by Henrietta herself. Darwins letters in 1870 and 1871 ( …
  • scepticism; many of her arguments are reminiscent of Darwins own discussion of religious belief in
  • and attended by Henriettas friend and relative Emily Caroline (Lena) Langton, was advertised in a
  • of the theory of natural selection. Snow occasionally sent Darwin information relating to his
  • emotion (see letters from F. J. Wedgwood to H. E. and C. R. Darwin, [186772],  letter   nos. 7058
  • one of  Descent  (see letter from Charles and Emma Darwin to F. J. Wedgwood, [March 1871?], and
  • period of their courtship. We are grateful to William Darwin for permission to publish the
  • Edmund Langton was Henriettas cousin; his wife, Emily Caroline , was nicknamed Lena. …

Darwin in letters, 1837–1843: The London years to 'natural selection'

Summary

The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle voyage was one of extraordinary activity and productivity in which he became recognised as a naturalist of outstanding ability, as an author and editor, and as a professional…

Matches: 29 hits

  • The seven-year period following Darwin's return to England from the Beagle  voyage was one
  • a family Busy as he was with scientific activities, Darwin found time to re-establish family
  • close contact. In November 1838, two years after his return, Darwin became engaged to his cousin, …
  • daughter, Anne Elizabeth, moved to Down House in Kent, where Darwin was to spend the rest of his
  • his greatest theoretical achievement, the most important of Darwins activities during the years
  • identifications of his bird and fossil mammal specimens, Darwin arrived at the daring and momentous
  • in species. With this new theoretical point of departure Darwin continued to make notes and explore
  • present in the version of 1859. Young author Darwins investigation of the species
  • the  Beagle  had returned to England, news of some of Darwins findings had been spread by the
  • great excitement. The fuller account of the voyage and Darwins discoveries was therefore eagerly
  • suitable categories for individual experts to work upon, Darwin applied himself to the revision of
  • of the surveying voyage of H.M.S. Adventure and Beagle. Darwins volume bore the title  Journal
  • visited by H.M.S. BeagleAlso in November 1837, Darwin read the fourth of a series of papers to
  • to the Society of 9 March 1838), had been developed by Darwin from a suggestion made by his uncle, …
  • Sedgwick, [after 15 May 1838] ). The new research Darwin undertook after 1837 was an
  • time, the parallel terraces, orroads’, of Glen Roy. Darwin had seen similar formations on the
  • roads of Glen Roy’,  Collected papers  1: 88137). Darwin later abandoned this view, calling it a
  • contemporaneous unstratified deposits of South America”, Darwin continued to defend his and Lyells
  • 1842, having heard of evidence of glaciation in North Wales, Darwin made a tour there in order to
  • more satisfactorily than any alternative explanation. Darwin eventually relinquished this theory and
  • the Beagle voyage In addition to his work on geology Darwin undertook to provide a
  • The correspondence provides a nearly complete record of Darwins arrangements with the Treasury, his
  • … , by Thomas Bella total of nineteen quarto issues. Darwin contributed a substantial portion of the
  • and habitats of the species. Mr Arthrobalanus Darwin had originally planned to include
  • Archipelago off the coast of Chile. These unexpectedly led Darwin to devote eight years (184654) …
  • As the correspondence from these years shows, that work put Darwin in communication with most of the
  • and corals by William Lonsdale ( Collected papers , 2). Darwins crustacean specimens, originally
  • Only the plants were neglected. During the voyage Darwin had expected that J. S. Henslow would
  • several months (See  Correspondence  vol. 1, letter to Caroline Darwin, 13 October 1834 , and

Darwin and Gender Projects by Harvard Students

Summary

Working in collaboration with Professor Sarah Richardson and Dr Myrna Perez, Darwin Correspondence Project staff developed a customised set of 'Darwin and Gender' themed resources for a course on Gender, Sex and Evolution first taught at Harvard…

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  • with Professor Sarah Richardson and Dr Myrna Perez, Darwin Correspondence Project staff
  • can be found to the right. Containing extracts from Darwin's published works as well as
  • to encourage students to explore disparities between Darwin's public ideas and those he
  • by the resources include: To what extent were Darwin's ideas about the sexes
  • one of the key insights of the DCPs research into Darwins understandings of sex and gender. In his
  • between the child and the man” ( Descent 2: 317). Darwin believed, however, that although women
  • superior to men. Sarah argues that understanding Darwins belief in the higher morality of
  • her house. Miranda focuses on the role that Darwins domestic life played in his
  • rendition of Mirandas project, you can learn more about Darwins reliance and trust in Henriettas
  • of style, the more grateful I shall be.”(Letter to Darwin, H. E., [8 Feb 1870] ) Although Miranda
  • Amalia also believes that there is room to complicate Darwins published views on sex and gender by
  • inferiority as immutable.” Amalia delves into Darwins exchanges with Kennard; exchanges
  • 1882 ) In this personal exchange, she finds evidence that Darwin believed women could improve their
  • project, follow the links below: Charles Darwin to Caroline Wedgwood: http://www
  • Charles Darwin to Caroline Kennard: http://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/entry-13607 Caroline

Language: key letters

Summary

How and why language evolved bears on larger questions about the evolution of the human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the development of human speech from animal sounds in The Descent of Man (1871),…

Matches: 13 hits

  • human species, and the relationship between man and animals. Darwin presented his views on the
  • he first began to reflect on the transmutation of species. Darwins correspondence reveals the scope
  • he exchanged information and ideas. Letter 346Darwin, C. R. to Darwin, C. S., 27 Feb 1837
  • one stock.” Letter 2070Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [before 29 Sept 1857] …
  • down of former continents.” Letter 3054Darwin, C. R. to Lyell, Charles, 2 Feb [1861] …
  • that languages, like species, were separately created. Darwin writes to the geologist Charles Lyell
  • I tell him is perfectly logical.” Letter 5605Darwin, C. R. to Müller, J. F. T., 15 Aug
  • loud noise?” Letter 7040Wedgwood, Hensleigh to Darwin, C. R., [1868-70?] As
  • gradually growing to such a stageLetter 8367Darwin, C. R. to Wright, Chauncey, 3 June
  • unconsciously altering the breed. Letter 8962Darwin, C. R. to Max Müller, Friedrich, 3
  • Letter 10194Max Müller, Friedrich to Darwin, C. R., 13 Oct [1875] For Müller, human and
  • Language […]” Letter 9887Dawkins, W. B. to Darwin, C. R., 14 Mar 1875 The
  • of race […]” Letter 11074Sayce, A. H. to Darwin, C. R., 27 July 1877 Darwins

List of correspondents

Summary

Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. Click on a name to see the letters Darwin exchanged with that correspondent.    "A child of God" (1) Abberley,…

Matches: 3 hits

  • … Below is a list of Darwin's correspondents with the number of letters for each one. …
  • … Dareste, Camille (9) Darwin family (1) …
  • … William (4) Shuttleworth, Caroline (1) …

Darwin in letters, 1879: Tracing roots

Summary

Darwin spent a considerable part of 1879 in the eighteenth century. His journey back in time started when he decided to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an essay on Erasmus’s evolutionary ideas…

Matches: 16 hits

  • There are summaries of all Darwin's letters from the year 1879 on this website.  The full texts
  • 27 of the print edition of The correspondence of Charles Darwin , published by Cambridge
  • to publish a biographical account of his grandfather Erasmus Darwin to accompany a translation of an
  • the sensitivity of the tips. Despite this breakthrough, when Darwin first mentioned the book to his
  • 1879 ). He was also unsatisfied with his account of Erasmus Darwin, declaring, ‘My little biography
  • a holiday in the Lake District in August did little to raise Darwins spirits. ‘I wish that my
  • W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, [after 26] July [1879] ). From July, Darwin had an additional worry: the
  • that his grandfather had felt the same way. In 1792, Erasmus Darwin had written: ‘The worst thing I
  • contained a warmer note and the promise of future happiness: Darwin learned he was to be visited by
  • Hacon, 31 December 1879 ). Seventy years old Darwins seventieth birthday on 12
  • the veteran of Modern Zoology’, but it was in Germany that Darwin was most fêted. A German
  • … ). The masters of Greiz College in Thuringia venerated Darwin asthe deep thinker’, while
  • accepted in Germany. ‘On this festive day’, Haeckel told Darwin, ‘you can look back, with justified
  • Hermann Müller wrote on 12 February to wish Darwin along and serene evening of life’. This
  • on the theory of development in connection with Charles Darwin and Ernst Haeckel. Kosmos was, as
  • any of his living descendants, other than Darwins sister Caroline (who was around 2 years old at

Darwin and the Church

Summary

The story of Charles Darwin’s involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It shows another side of the man who is more often remembered for his personal struggles with faith, or for his role in large-scale controversies over the…

Matches: 21 hits

  • The story of Charles Darwins involvement with the church is one that is told far too rarely. It
  • unique window into this complicated relationship throughout Darwins life, as it reveals his
  • belief (and doubt) than many non-conformist denominations. Darwins parents attended a Unitarian
  • the necessary studies to be a clergyman. During Darwins lifetime, the vast majority of the
  • income was essential to enjoy a gentlemanly lifestyle. For Darwin, who could rely on the financial
  • compatible with the pursuit of scientific interests. Indeed, Darwins Cambridge mentorJohn Stevens
  • … (Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine (1887): 321). Darwin started on his journey around the world
  • I can see it even through a grove of Palms.—’ (letter to Caroline Darwin, 256 April [1832] ). …
  • Museum or some other learned place’ (letter from E. A. Darwin, 18 August [1832] ). Writing to Fox
  • about—’ (letter to W. D. Fox, [912 August] 1835 ). Darwins doubts about orthodox belief, and
  • in 1838 and 1839, as can be read here. In the end, Darwin chose a middle coursea life of ease in
  • within six years of his return from the  Beagle  voyage, Darwin moved to Down House, in the
  • where their children Mary and Charles were buried; later Darwins brother Erasmus, Emmas sister
  • of Emma, whose religious scruples are discussed here. But Darwins correspondence reveals his own
  • Although he was not the principal landowner in Down, Darwin was a gentleman of means, and clearly
  • made inroads on Anglican authority in the countryside. The Darwin family took an interest in, and
  • Many of the letters highlighted in this section focus on Darwins long-standing relationship with
  • To the end of his life Innes refused to be persuaded by Darwins theory of evolution, but
  • cordial; in the first extant letter of the correspondence, Darwin wrote to Innes expressing concern
  • to 1869 (letter to J. B. Innes, [8 May 1848] and n. 2). Darwin praised Innes to John William
  • from Down (letter to J. B. Innes, 15 December [1861] ). Darwin and Innes continued to correspond

Women as a scientific audience

Summary

Target audience? | Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those exchanged with his editors and publisher, reveal a lot about his intended audience. Regardless of whether or not women were deliberately targeted as a…

Matches: 14 hits

  • Female readership | Reading Variation Darwin's letters, in particular those
  • a broad variety of women had access to, and engaged with, Darwin's published works. A set of
  • women a target audience? Letter 2447 - Darwin to Murray, J., [5 April 1859] …
  • that his views are original and will appeal to the public. Darwin asks Murray to forward the
  • and criticisms of style. Letter 2461 - Darwin to Hooker, J. D., [11 May 1859] …
  • it had been proofread and edited bya lady”. Darwin, E. to Darwin, W. E. , (March 1862
  • typically-male readers. Letter 7124 - Darwin to Darwin, H. E., [8 February 1870] …
  • and style. Letter 7329 - Murray , J. to Darwin, [28 September 1870] …
  • impeding general perusal. Letter 7331 - Darwin to Murray, J., [29 September
  • content. Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [16 May 1872] Reade
  • of women. Letter 8341 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [20 May 1872] Reade
  • women. Letter 8611 - Cupples, A. J. to Darwin, E., [8 November 1872] …
  • Cupples got hold of it first. Darwins female readership
  • Kennard, C. A. to Darwin, [28 January 1882] Caroline Kennard responds critically to Darwin

About Darwin

Summary

To many of us, Darwin’s name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural selection.  But even before the publication of On the Origin of Species in 1859, he was publicly known through his popular book about the voyage of the Beagle, and he was…

Matches: 15 hits

  • To many of us, Darwins name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural
  • of his careerOrigin  was the point of departure for Darwins important works on variation, …
  • of religion. Born on 12 February 1809, Charles Darwin was the son of two noteworthy families. …
  • renowned physician, poet, and natural philosopher Erasmus DarwinCharles grew up in Shrewsbury
  • cousin Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and they had ten childrenDarwin spent most of his life working from
  • by serving as research subjects themselves).  The depth of Darwins affection for his children is
  • the Cambridge professor of botanyJohn Stevens Henslow, Darwin was offered the chance to travel
  • to this five-year journey, which began when he was just 22, Darwin wrote, 'The voyage of the
  • my whole career.&#039While circumnavigating the globe, Darwin remained in constant contact with
  • life at seaBy the time he returned to England in 1836, Darwin had unearthed enormous mammalian
  • and plants that fuelled much of his later work. Darwins achievements during the voyage
  • heroes, the geologist Charles LyellThe six years Darwin lived in London were among the most
  • urged him to publish his views on evolution in 1858, when Darwin learned by letter that Alfred
  • specimens in the Malay Archipelago.  At home in Downe, Darwin spent the last two decades of his life
  • of the most renowned names in Victorian BritainDarwin died in April 1882; he was buried in

About Darwin

Summary

To many of us, Darwin’s name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural selection.  But even before the publication of On the Origin of Species in 1859, he was publicly known through his popular book about the voyage of the Beagle, and he was…

Matches: 15 hits

  • To many of us, Darwins name is synonymous with his theory of evolution by natural
  • of his career, the Origin was the point of departure for Darwins important works on variation, …
  • of religion. Born on 12 February 1809, Charles Darwin was the son of two noteworthy families. …
  • renowned physician, poet, and natural philosopher Erasmus DarwinCharles grew up in Shrewsbury
  • cousin Emma Wedgwood in 1839 and they had ten childrenDarwin spent most of his life working from
  • by serving as research subjects themselves).  The depth of Darwins affection for his children is
  • the Cambridge professor of botanyJohn Stevens Henslow, Darwin was offered the chance to travel
  • to this five-year journey, which began when he was just 22, Darwin wrote, “The voyage of the Beagle
  • my whole career.”  While circumnavigating the globe, Darwin remained in constant contact with
  • life at seaBy the time he returned to England in 1836, Darwin had unearthed enormous mammalian
  • and plants that fuelled much of his later work. Darwins achievements during the voyage
  • heroes, the geologist Charles LyellThe six years Darwin lived in London were among the most
  • urged him to publish his views on evolution in 1858, when Darwin learned by letter that Alfred
  • specimens in the Malay Archipelago.  At home in Downe, Darwin spent the last two decades of his life
  • him one of the most renowned names in Victorian BritainDarwin died in April 1882; he was buried

Darwin's health

Summary

On 28 March 1849, ten years before Origin was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker from Great Malvern in Worcestershire, where Dr James Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to…

Matches: 16 hits

  • March 1849, ten years before  Origin  was published, Darwin wrote to his good friend Joseph Hooker
  • Manby Gully ran a fashionable water-cure establishment. Darwin apologised for his delayed reply to
  • See the letter At various periods in his life Darwin suffered from gastrointestinal
  • fatigue, trembling, faintness, and dizziness. In 1849, Darwins symptoms became so severe that he
  • for three months while he took Dr Gullys water cure. In Darwins letter to Hooker, he described Dr
  • See the letter After returning from Malvern, Darwin continued his hydropathic
  • 1863. In a letter to Hooker in April of 1861for example, Darwin used his delicate physiology to
  • Edward Wickstead Lane, and at Ilkley with Dr Edmund Smith, Darwin sought advice from his consulting
  • of a fashionable spinal ice treatment. In April 1864, Darwin attributed his improved health to Dr
  • to JDHooker, 13 April [1864] ) Why was Darwins so ill? Historians and others have
  • that there were psychological or psychosomatic dimensions to Darwins most severe periods of crisis. …
  • letter to F. T. Buckland, 15 December [1864] ). On Darwins early stomach troubles, see
  • occurrences of flatulence (see Colp 1977, pp. 46-7). Darwin first mentioned attacks of
  • daily (see Correspondence vol. 12, letter from Emma Darwin to W. D. Fox, [6 May 1864] ). …
  • up food.  In his letter to Chapman of 16 May [1865] , Darwin stated that his sickness wasalways
  • 64). Fainting androckinghad been recorded in Emma Darwins diary (DAR 242) on several occasions

Darwin in letters, 1876: In the midst of life

Summary

1876 was the year in which the Darwins became grandparents for the first time.  And tragically lost their daughter-in-law, Amy, who died just days after her son's birth.  All the letters from 1876 are now published in volume 24 of The Correspondence…

Matches: 23 hits

  • The year 1876 started out sedately enough with Darwin working on the first draft of his book on the
  • games. ‘I have won, hurrah, hurrah, 2795 games’, Darwin boasted; ‘my wifepoor creature, has won
  • regarding the ailments that were so much a feature of Darwin family life. But the calm was not to
  • four days later. ‘I cannot bear to think of the future’, Darwin confessed to William on 11
  • once, the labour of checking proofs proved a blessing, as Darwin sought solace for the loss of his
  • and his baby son Bernard now part of the household, and Darwin recasting his work on dimorphic and
  • had involved much time and effort the previous year, and Darwin clearly wanted to focus his
  • When Smith, Elder and Company proposed reissuing two of Darwins three volumes of the geology of
  • single-volume edition titled Geological observations , Darwin resisted making any revisions at
  • volume, Coral reefs , already in its second edition. Darwin was neverthelessfirmly resolved not
  • meticulous correction of errors in the German editions made Darwin less anxious about correcting the
  • to Carus. ( Letter to J. V. Carus, 24 April 1876. ) Darwin focused instead on the second
  • concentrated on themeans of crossing’, was seen by Darwin as the companion to Cross and self
  • return to old work than part of the future work outlined by Darwin in hislittle Autobiography’ ( …
  • holiday after finishing Cross and self fertilisation , Darwin took up the suggestion made by a
  • for his family only. Writing for an hour every afternoon, Darwin finished his account on 3 August
  • dimittis.”’ (‘Recollections’, pp. 41819). Darwin remained firm in his resolution to
  • ever return to the consideration of man.’ In particular, Darwin seemed eager to avoid issues that
  • wrote with the good news that he could restore Darwin to a religious life. This transformation would
  • that used to be called transmigration, Nemo pointed out to Darwin, adding, ‘the term nowadays is
  • enemies... Views such as these were easy enough for Darwin to dismiss, but it was more
  • to Down. In the same month, Darwin heard that his sister Caroline Wedgwood continued to languish in
  • the Darwins were organising a special train carriage to get Caroline home, they had experienced a

Capturing Darwin’s voice: audio of selected letters

Summary

On a sunny Wednesday in June 2011 in a makeshift recording studio somewhere in Cambridge, we were very pleased to welcome Terry Molloy back to the Darwin Correspondence Project for a special recording session. Terry, known for his portrayal of Davros in Dr…

Matches: 10 hits

  • we were very pleased to welcome Terry Molloy back to the Darwin Correspondence Project for a
  • The Archers , previously worked with us playing Charles Darwin in a dramatisation of the
  • to life with his masterful characterisation of Charles DarwinIt was a long and full day at the
  • A significant proportion of the selection comprised Darwins letters to women correspondents, who
  • Other female correspondents asked Darwin questions about the spiritual implications of his theories
  • Even the youngest female members of the Darwin family were not exempted from making observations, as
  • Kennard written on 9 January 1882 , only shortly before Darwins death, about the equality of
  • exuberance of the Beagle letters (e.g. letter to Caroline Darwin, 29 April 1836 ) to the more
  • in interpreting  particular letters. How should one read Darwins politely worded rebuke to St G. J. …
  • proofreading a draft chapter of Descent (letter to H. E. Darwin, [8 February 1870] ). …

Correspondence with women

Summary

We know of letters to or from around 2000 correspondents, about 100 of whom were women. Using the letter summaries available on this website, the letters can be assigned to rough categories.  Included in the count are letters to women in Darwin’s family…

Matches: 21 hits

  • categoriesIncluded in the count are letters to women in Darwins family that contained messages
  • between them is the largest surviving one between Darwin and a woman. The next biggest block after
  • These were from womenoften strangerswho had read Darwins work, had noticed something that
  • to or from friends and relations who had been asked by Darwin to make specific observations. The
  • on the most lengthy and detailed correspondences with Darwin of all his female correspondents other
  • to take up: it could be learnt and practised at home. One of Darwins botanical correspondents, …
  • and editors (there is a substantial correspondence between Darwin and his daughter Henrietta
  • beer and someone seeking to sell a portrait of Erasmus Darwin. In addition there are a small but
  • editorial help, and advice on presentation. We know from Darwins own comments that Emma was
  • of his works. In his correspondence with women botanists, Darwin was neither dismissive nor
  • it an unfeminine (messy and heartless) subject. Darwins comments on thedifference in the
  • so conciliatory; a difference in disposition is something Darwin can support from observations of
  • men have achieved higher eminence in all fields; and Darwin attributes this not to social causes, …
  • of the key to male success is interesting in the light of Darwins own opinion of hisgenius”; he
  • persistence more valuable than inspiration.) Additionally, Darwin thought that constant fighting and
  • have developed similar qualities.) At this point, Darwin applies his own logic of inheritance
  • sexual difference. By the end of this passage, Darwin has concluded thatman has ultimately
  • by universal education. When he was asked by Caroline A. Kennard , an American campaigner
  • happiness of our homes, would in this case greatly suffer. (Darwin to C. A. Kennard, 9 January
  • of paid employment. No doubt many reasons underlie Darwins conservative yet courteous and
  • on assumptions about prehistory, awkwardly enough. But for Darwin, the conditions of his own era

Science: A Man’s World?

Summary

Discussion Questions|Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth-century women participated in the world of science, be it as experimenters, observers, editors, critics, producers, or consumers. Despite this, much of the…

Matches: 15 hits

  • Discussion Questions | Letters Darwin's correspondence show that many nineteenth
  • Letters Darwins Notes On Marriage [April - July 1838] In these notes, …
  • of family, home and sociability. Letter 489 - Darwin to Wedgwood, E., [20 January 1839] …
  • theories, & accumulating facts in silence & solitude”. Darwin also comments that he has
  • Letter 3715 - Claparède, J. L. R. A. E. to Darwin, [6 September 1862] Claparède
  • are not those of her sex”. Letter 4038 - Darwin to Lyell, C., [12-13 March 1863] …
  • critic”. Letter 4377 - Haeckel, E. P. A. to Darwin, [2 January 1864] Haeckel
  • works”. Letter 4441 - Becker, L. E. to Darwin, [30 March 1864] Lydia Becker
  • to study nature. Letter 4940 - Cresy, E. to Darwin, E., [20 November 1865] …
  • masculine nor pedantic”. Letter 6976 - Darwin to Blackwell, A. B., [8 November 1869] …
  • … , (1829). Letter 7329 - Murray, J. to Darwin, [28 September 1870] Written
  • them ears”. Letter 8055 - Hennell, S. S. to Darwin, [7 November 1871] Sarah
  • thinking”. Letter 8079 - Norton, S. R. to Darwin, [20 November 1871] Sarah
  • pamphlet herself. Letter 8335 - Reade, W. W. to Darwin, [16 May 1872] Reade
  • Kennard, C. A., [9 January 1882] Darwin responds to Caroline Kennards enquiry about
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