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Darwin Correspondence Project

From Richard Trevor Clarke   [April? 1863]1

Dear Mr Darwin

Enclosed are blossoms of the individual hautbois which I have used as female parent in my experiments.2 The anthers are certainly only rudimentary. I may mention it is very possible that the microscope may shew some grains 〈of〉 pollen, other blossoms on the same spike and perhaps th〈ese〉 having been fertilized by myself.—

I am glad you received the plants safe.3 I propose in future when any little curious fact turns up to send you a short memorandum, knowing that working men dont like too much correspondence

Very truly yours | R Trevor Clarke 〈〈6〉3 Eaton Square | for 10 days4

Footnotes

The conjectured date is the earliest possible for the flowering of strawberries subsequent to the letters from R. T. Clarke, [after 25 November 1862] and [after 27 November 1862] (Correspondence vol. 10). See n. 2, below.
Clarke described his experiments with strawberry crosses in his letter to CD of [after 25 November 1862] (Correspondence vol. 10). See also Variation 1: 352.
Clarke had sent strawberry plants to CD in November 1862 (see Correspondence vol. 10, letter from R. T. Clarke, [after 27 November 1862]). CD’s reply has not been found.
A fellow army officer of Clarke’s, Major-general Alexander Murray Tulloch, lived at 63 Eaton Square, London (Post Office London directory 1863).

Summary

Encloses strawberry blossoms used in his crossing experiments.

Letter details

Letter no.
DCP-LETT-4070
From
Richard Trevor Clarke
To
Charles Robert Darwin
Sent from
London, Eaton Square
Source of text
DAR 161: 164
Physical description
2pp damaged

Please cite as

Darwin Correspondence Project, “Letter no. 4070,” accessed on 22 September 2019, https://www.darwinproject.ac.uk/letter/DCP-LETT-4070.xml

Also published in The Correspondence of Charles Darwin, vol. 11

letter