Tag Archives: Science

Gender ‘Behind the Scenes’

The Darwin Correspondence Project recently launched an online exhibit - ’Darwin Behind the Scenes.’ The exhibit uses Charles Darwin’s personal correspondence as a means of gleaning information about the relationship between his life, Victorian culture and the writing and content of his … Continue reading

Charles & Emma Darwin: a typical Victorian marriage?

Kirstie Hampson recently completed a Graduate Certificate in History at Birkbeck, University of London, and used the Darwin Correspondence Project online archives while researching her dissertation; “Having access to such an amazing archive online made the research aspect much easier!”, … Continue reading

‘The Evolution of Woman’ versus ‘The Descent of Man’

Women have interpreted and applied evolutionary theory in arguments about women’s nature for over a century. Eliza Burt Gamble (1841-1920) was a pioneer in this endeavor. Gamble was an advocate of the Woman Movement, a mother, a writer, and a … Continue reading

Harvard Project #4: Physical Science

Following the success of last year’s collaboration, the Darwin and Gender project is delighted to team up again with students at the Department of the History of Science, Harvard University.   Students of Prof. Sarah Richardson’s Sex, Gender and Evolution course have used the correspondence to produce a series of … Continue reading

Harvard Project #3: An address to the National Science Foundation

Following the success of last year’s collaboration, the Darwin and Gender project is delighted to team up again with students at the Department of the History of Science, Harvard University.   Students of Prof. Sarah Richardson’s Sex, Gender and Evolution course have used the correspondence to produce a … Continue reading

Harvard Project #2: “Man has Ultimately Become Superior to Woman” – or has he?

Following the success of last year’s collaboration, the Darwin and Gender project is delighted to team up again with students at the Department of the History of Science, Harvard University.   Students of Prof. Sarah Richardson’s Sex, Gender and Evolution course have used … Continue reading

Harvard Project #1: The Amazing Dar-Man

Following the success of last year’s collaboration, the Darwin and Gender project is delighted to team up again with students at the Department of the History of Science, Harvard University.   Students of Prof. Sarah Richardson’s Sex, Gender and Evolution course have used … Continue reading

Women, Fashion and Frivolity

If, as we saw in an earlier post, evolutionary theory could account for the peculiarities and embellishments of men’s dress, what about women’s fashion? In “Development in Dress,” George Darwin argued that the apparent fancy points of men’s coats, hats, and cloaks … Continue reading

What’s the difference between a peacock and a pocket flap?

Why do hats have hatbands? Why are there buttons on a cuff, or tails on a coat? What does a peacock have in common with a pocket flap? According to Charles Darwin’s son George, the answer to all these questions … Continue reading

The Public and Private Face of Mary Treat

Mary Treat was a Naturalist from New Jersey and a major contributor to botanical and entomological developments of the nineteenth century. Over the period 1871 – 1876 she exchanged fifteen letters with Darwin – more than any other woman Naturalist.   As … Continue reading